Community
Fusion Manufacture
Talk shop with the Fusion (formerly Fusion 360) Manufacture Community. Share tool strategies, tips, get advice and solve problems together with the best minds in the industry.
cancel
Showing results for 
Show  only  | Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Plunge Milling

32 REPLIES 32
Reply
Message 1 of 33
231Matthew
2776 Views, 32 Replies

Plunge Milling

I am wondering if anyone in here would benefit from Fusion offering a plunge milling option.  It seems like it could be beneficial.  I just want to be able to select a 2d surface and create a toolpath, rather than sketching a line, and creating a rectangle pattern, and then making a drill cycle.  I think its kinda cumbersome the way that i have to do it, and just wondering if anyone else does it differently or maybe not at all.  We are talking like simple 2d shapes, the edges of a block of steel, nothing too crazy.  Any help or ideas, Id appreciate them greatly.  With the strength of fusion, Id find it beneficial to just pick a solid surface, tell it how much to stepover, and set my heights.  Thanks for reading.

Tags (1)
32 REPLIES 32
Message 2 of 33
seth.madore
in reply to: 231Matthew

I do know it's been asked for from time to time over the years, but it's my understanding that is not likely to ever see it's way into the product. I think this may be.....the 4th time I've seen the request on these forums, in the last....5-6 years or so.


Seth Madore
Customer Advocacy Manager - Manufacturing
Message 3 of 33
231Matthew
in reply to: seth.madore

i cant imagine that there isnt more people that utliize this to cut vertical walls that are super deep.  Our old software Gibbscam we had to do the same thing that you would have to do with fusion.  Just figured with the power of Fusion they would have something easier than this old workaround.  😞

Message 4 of 33
jamesT47WA
in reply to: seth.madore

I think that most people don't know to come here and ask. This would be a beneficial option for the software. I am looking for the same operation and right now the only way to do it is to set up multiple drilling operations and plunge mill it that way. I would think that is an easy add to the drilling cycle

Message 5 of 33
VicKosta
in reply to: jamesT47WA

It seems to me you could sketch one vertical line as start point, use Trace with tool on center or left / right offset depending on position of sketched line and tool diameter, then duplicate cut in linear patterns in X and Y directions.

You could manage stepover in pattern settings and even deal with odd shapes by duplicating tool paths.

Message 6 of 33
VicKosta
in reply to: jamesT47WA

So, here is rough sample, it's not ideal and it only works with tool on center but it seems to have potential for quick roughing of large volume of stock with only few strokes of a mouse, perhaps drilling is better option if pecking is desired.

Is that what you are looking for?

 

2021-05-11 20_58_20-Autodesk Fusion 360.png

Message 7 of 33
mattdlr89
in reply to: VicKosta

I'm working on a project now where this feature would be quite handy. The previous CAM software I used had a function for plunge milling - rarely used but does have its use cases.

Message 8 of 33
VicKosta
in reply to: mattdlr89

If you "think outside the chip barrel", there are options to get things done without dedicated button to push that accomplishes one thing or another.

There is a mention of using drilling cycle, but on 3 axis vertical mill, you can only drill strait down in Z axis, by using  trace, you can construct sketch line at angle or include curves to get around part geometry and duplicate passes in pattern, adopting concept to more then just strait plunges.

Message 9 of 33
jamesT47WA
in reply to: VicKosta

Thanks for the idea. I'm gonna try this right now. One of the issues i'm having is I have an older Okuma that can only take 32k file size. As soon as I helically interpolate anything the file size jumps. Drilling/plunging is tiny comparatively.

Message 10 of 33
VicKosta
in reply to: jamesT47WA

You should have RS232 on that old Okuma, throw old laptop on a cart next to it an drip feed miles of code.

Typically, lathes still come with same impairment but on newer controls having USB and PC card option, I recently used PC card to store sub program, called it by M198 from main program and M199 to return to main program, only drawback is that if you interrupt the cycle, you have to start from beginning or split the program in more manageable parts.  

Message 11 of 33
jamesT47WA
in reply to: VicKosta

So, im working with a cylinder and I need to offest each cut by .300" (DOC for my plunge mill). To test I drew straight vertical lines (9 total) from center out to each edges of the circle and used the trace op and it worked perfect. Now i need to finish the circle (currently looks like a circle with 1 horizontal cut through the center). Having issues creating a rectangular pattern as the vertical line is not moving in the correct directions. I sketched them in the front plane but my original sketch is in the top plane. Ideas

 

Hope this makes sense

Message 12 of 33
jamesT47WA
in reply to: VicKosta

Ahhhh, yes. The dreaded drip feed on the Okuma. Unfortunately, unless you have the DNC-b option, you cannot drip feed. You can only use the bubble memory. I've tried multiple ways around it and I keep coming up with the same answer. Buy the option from Okuma, which runs roughly $8k installed. If you have any ideas i'm open to try. 1998 Okuma Cadet Mate with OSP700m control. Tape reader and 3.5" floppy drive. My last hope is behind the tape reader option but i'm afraid it's gonna be the same answer. Okuma really short changed these machines

Message 13 of 33
VicKosta
in reply to: jamesT47WA

I started to read your post, then a guy with no musical talent started whistling something I can't associate with music, distracted me to the point of having to start from the top but once I got to the end I was confused and could not form a picture of just what your issue may be.

Sorry, it's lunch time here and I am mentally out of commission but maybe you need to offset planes by distance  or angle to produce correct base for your sketch and honestly,.... this can only go so far before you need to employ other strategies for stock removal.😁🤣

Message 14 of 33
VicKosta
in reply to: VicKosta

OH, working with round stock, draw one line and program tool path, than use circular pattern to duplicate tool paths on that diameter. Determine spacing and number of cuts inside pattern definition.😆

Message 15 of 33
jamesT47WA
in reply to: VicKosta

Finally got it! The circular pattern worked perfect. I was using it incorrectly to start with but now i understand it. I also cut my file size down from 31.5kb to 4kb!!!!!

Message 16 of 33
VicKosta
in reply to: jamesT47WA

What motivated you, me or guy with no musical talent confusing me?🤣

Message 17 of 33
jamesT47WA
in reply to: VicKosta

LOL. Sounds like this girl I worked with at this telemarketing job and her name was Macarena, like that annoying song, "Hey macarena". And she said it with a Spanish flare, every GD time and she was the loudest in the room. And of course that was like every 2 minutes cause the job sucked and everyone hung up on us. So it could be worse😉 

 

Is there a way to duplicate the operation to another hole without creating more geometry? I have a total of 3 holes to do in each part

Message 18 of 33
VicKosta
in reply to: jamesT47WA

I think you can duplicate original pattern, make point on top of other hole, use "Duplication pattern" from drop down menu and select that point, if you are on larger diameter then reset your number of instances on circle to cover full diameter,..... I am just assuming the order, dig around a little.

Message 19 of 33
231Matthew
in reply to: 231Matthew

So the work around is sketching the geometry that i want to cut.  Creating a point and using rectangular pattern and telling it how many points and what direction and distance to make multiple points and then using a drill cycle to do it.  Its just 2-d geometry, never any 3-d stuff.  It just seems kind of clunky.  Other softwares I have used did have this option, but im super happy with fusion, and just looking for a faster way-less cumbersome way to do this feature.  

 

*whistling my way out of the office now*  🙂

Message 20 of 33
VicKosta
in reply to: 231Matthew

Keep in mind that Fusion tries to develop in multiple directions, covering all major manufacturing processes, so it locks a lot of features you find in 30 years old software dedicated to only one segment of that activity and constantly refining it.

There are some raw options that let you try and duplicate feature that really doesn't exist but there are limits to that and you have to ask yourself, is it worth the trouble with other options at your disposal ?

Can't find what you're looking for? Ask the community or share your knowledge.

Post to forums  

Autodesk Design & Make Report