CAD Managers

Reply
*Tapp, Joshua
Message 11 of 17 (44 Views)

Re:

02-02-2000 02:12 PM in reply to: *Middlebrook, Mark
We have montly CADD meetings here, and pizza is provided. Usually, the
current situation with things is reported. Lately (and I'm not the CADD
manager, we don't have an official one--but we do have a CADD coordinator),
I've been doing "presentations" at each meeting. I've discussed the XCLIP
command, Volo View Express (I've done it twice, had to redo it after they
put in mark-up features), associative dimensions (this is a multi-part one,
I've only done one so far), and some other short things. It only lasts an
hour, and I only get part of that time. I'm setting up with our CADD
coordinator a schedule of mini-seminars to do. I'm hoping we can turn the
CADD meetings into something more educational.

Also, I hope to have the architecture group have some brown bag lunches
someday and we'll go over the features of Softdesk S8 completely. Then,
when we go to ADT (at whatever version is out then), we can continue.

--
Joshua Tapp ( josht@scm-ae.com )
Designer/Intern - Architecture Group - SCM Consultants, Inc. -
http://www.scm-ae.com - A part of Infrastructure Northwest Group -
http://www.ttinw.com - Division of Tetra Tech, Inc. - http://tetratech.com

Matt Stachoni wrote in message
news:gcsd9sclraft7e971v58a0rt898jctucg4@4ax.com...
> Mark,
>
> On Mon, 31 Jan 2000 14:53:41 -0800, "Mark Middlebrook"
> wrote:
>
> >What are the major topics in your CAD standards (e.g., chapter titles)?
>
> As the CAD Manager for my firm (Architecture) I work on developing and
> training my staff on the following broad topics for AutoCAD:
>
> 1. Hardware/Software/Configuration/Basics
> a. Network architecture (NT Server/Workstation)
> b. Roaming profiles and logging onto the server
> c. You system software
> d. Drive mapping (Project drive, Support drive, resources)
> e. Internet basics
> f. Printers and plotters (basics)
> g. Email system
>
> 2. Workflow
> a. Project and drawing nomenclature
> b. Xref architecture (File A xref to File B) - varies on discipline/firm
> c. Drawings <-> Plot relationships (varies with each firm)
>
> 3. AutoCAD Nuts and bolts
> a. Accuracy and precision requirements of all drawing files
> b. Using project and drawing templates and setting up new drawings
> c. General drawing conditions (where 0,0,0 is, etc.)
> d. Layers (for each type of drawing)
> e. Colors/Pen weights
> f. Block libraries / Interface & procedure
> g. Annotation standards (text styles, fonts, dim's, ref. marks, etc.)
> h. Purging files
>
> 4. Drawing specific "How-To's"
> (includes a checklist of requirements of each type of dwg)
> a. Space planning/Massing studies
> b. Architectural floor plans (DD-CD)
> c. Reflected ceiling plans
> e. Furniture plans
> f. Power and communications plans
> g. Finish plans (we specialize in Interiors)
> h. Elevations
> i. Sections/Wall sections/Exterior detailing
> j. Interior elevations/sections/details
> k. Schedules
> l. CD's (plottable drawings)
>
> 5. Customization
> a. Macros list (developed in house)
> b. Utilities list (developed in house and/or external)
> c. Bonus and Express tools (as developed by Adesk)
> d. Mouse, menu settings (interface customization)
> e. Personal toolbars
>
> 6. Productivity
> a. Using Xrefs intelligently to create a smooth workflow
> b. X,Y & Z filters, other means of point aquisition
> c. Using SNAP and Osnaps for accuracy
> d. Selection set filtering
> e. Using scripts and inhouse utilities to process multiple drawings
> f. In depth explanation of complex macros
> g. Importing and exporting information from one drawing to another
>
> 7. Exporting drawings to clients and consultants
> a. Step by step process to prepare dwgs for email/ftp
> b. Email protocols for sending files (electronic transmittals)
>
> 8. Importing files from others
>
> 9. Plotting
>
> 10. Do's and Don'ts
>
> ===============================
>
> Above all, the most important aspect of managing a CAD group is to clearly
> define a workflow up front. While Chapter 2 above is fairly small to look
> at, it is by far the largest section in my handbook (soon to be Web
pages).
> It explains how we do xrefs across drawings, how the drawings fit
together,
> how it all combines to create plot drawings, and how the group can work on
> a project without bumping into each other. Each discipline (or firm) may
> come up with a different standard "way of doing things." But explaining it
> up front gives everyone a base from which the rest of the manual works
> from.
>
> Another major topic that is an overriding concern (with us, anyway) is
> drawing accuracy and precision. Because of the downstream methodolgy we
> work with (plans -> elevations -> sections -> details) getting the plan
> 100% accurate is very important, because everything else can be then
> electronically built from the plans. I have trained our staff to be ever
> vigalent in looking for and fixing BadCad®.
>
> I might also add that in a previous firm, my attempts to spend time doing
> this were shot down my "upper management" as inefficient, and drawing
> quality and general productivity suffered. Thus I made it clear when I
came
> here that I need to make sure people do this. In other words, my goal is
to
> make all CAD users that work here as completely anal as I am about the
> drawing accuracy and condition.
>
> While I need to enumerate the basic dull stuff (pen weights, layers), my
> users get the most improvement from our bi-monthly CAD meetings. We have
> them every 2nd Monday during lunch, and the company picks up the lunch tab
> from the local sub shop. Each meeting has a defined topic (next week is
> annotation) and we get into the nitty gritty, and I can explain macros and
> take requests for new macros or customization. I think this is an integral
> part of the CAD Managers duties, and needs to be fully supported by any
> higher-ups to be successful.
>
> Even some of our architects who don't use CAD come to the meetings,
> although sometimes I wonder if the free food isn't the motivating factor
> :smileyhappy:.
>
> Hope it helped,
>
> Matt
> stachoni@bellatlantic.net
>
*Martin, Jason
Message 12 of 17 (44 Views)

Re: CAD standards query

02-03-2000 02:25 PM in reply to: *Middlebrook, Mark
This is a little late to the game but it might still help you out

Comments in-line:

Mark Middlebrook wrote in message
news:86rceb$i9b13@adesknews2.autodesk.com...
> I'm working on an article on CAD standards. I'd appreciate any feedback on
> your experiences with them, including any of the following specifics:
>
> + Research: What resources did you find helpful (industry standards, Web
> sites, print publications, etc.)?
>

Our CSG (Cad System Guideline) was first printed in July of 1992, and at the
time industry cad standards were at a minimum. We did base our layer name
conventions on the AIA short version. We're currently seeing how much
trouble/time it will cost us to implement the national cad standards (in
some form or another).

Our CSG TOC is as follows
Introduction
Revision History
Index
Section 1 Project Organization
Project Data
The Background Concept
Background Terminology
Background Organization
Section 2 File Management
Project Directory Structure
Cad File Naming Formats
Project File Management
Project Archiving and Deliverables
Section 3 Cad Layer Standards
Layer Naming Methodology
Master Layer List
Background Layer Groups
Plotting and Pen Sizes
Section 4 Cad Drafting Standards
Drawing Environment
Text Styles
Dimension Styles
Sheet Numbering
Match Lines
Sheet Borders
Annotation Symbols
Scale Factor Chart
Section 5 Cad Procedures
Cad Procedures
Script Files for Master Backgrounds
Changing Project Drawings
Management Checklist of Cad Issues
Project Review
Transmitting Cad Files
Softdesk Keyboard Macros
Section 6 Department Cad Procedures
Design
Architectural
Structural
Mechanical
Electrical
Civil

> + Development: How did you company go about the difficult process of
coming
> up with standards? Major issues, disagreements, ways of coming to
> consensus..

We currently have a "CAD Team" in our office. The cad team consists of at
least one member of each department (design, arch, struc, elec, mech, and
civil). If there is a problem with the one of the disciplines the others
basically beat on them until it is worked out. There are two IS guys that
regularly attend the meetings and try to "steer" everyone in a direction and
keep the meetings under control. Meetings are held every first and third
monday of the month.

>
> + Implementation: Once you did come to some decision about what the
> standards should be, how did you implement them (documentation,
> customization, training, and enforcement)?
>
> + Documentation: How do you document your standards? Hardcopy (created in
> what programs)? On-line (HTML, WinHelp, PDF)?

Currently the standards are only distributed in hardcopy format. Each
person in the office has a binder and anytime revisions are issued that
persons binder is updated. We are hoping that in the next year to publish
them to our intranet so that updates will be easier. We also send out the
meeting notes of the CAD Team meetings to everyone in the office so that
anyone that has a problem with what we are doing can talk to their
Disciplines cad coordinator.

>
> + Customization: Did you create or use template drawings, menu macros,
> AutoLISP programs, third party applications, etc. in order to help
automate
> standards compliance?

All of the above. We use templates to set basic dim styles, text style etc.
We've used softdesk since we started using autocad. All of the menu's are
customized, and we write lisp program to improve a number of other tasks.

>
> + Enforcement: How do you try to get users to comply with CAD standards?

Peer pressure seems to work great. Because of all the data sharing that we
do between disciplines most of the time if you're doing something majorly
wrong the other disciplines know about and you will have a small crowd
around your desk quickly. We also have a drawing review, that must be
requested by the project manager. The drawing review consists of a
checklist (the checklist is in our CSG) that the cad
tech/engineer/architect/whatever uses to check their drawings against
certain parts of the cad standards. At that point he/she is allowed to make
any corrections to the drawings. Once he/she is done the PM notifies
someone from IS, who also performes the checklist.

>
> + Revision: How often do you revise your standards? What level of
additional
> effort is involved?

Constantly. We start at the beginning of the book and start reading stuff.
If that's still the way that we do it then we generally leave it in. If a
lot of people don't do it there has to be a reason. Is it to hard to
understand? Is it to hard to do? Does it take to much time? Is it
actually needed? Once we've gone through a chapter that chapter is
generally re-published and we go on to the next one. When we get to the end
of the book we start over at the beginning

>
> These categories are just my first cut at breaking down the subject into
> chunks that I can think and write about. Feel free to respond in a more
> anecdotal way or to comment on just one or two categories.
>
> I'm especially interested in hearing from people outside the AEC
> professions, although I'm happy to hear from AEC folks, too.
>
> Thanks,
> Mark Middlebrook
> mark@markcad.com
>
>

hth

jason martin
frankfurt-short-bruza
*Shaw, Roger D.
Message 13 of 17 (44 Views)

Re:

02-03-2000 03:27 PM in reply to: *Middlebrook, Mark


There wouldn't be a way we could see an example of your Management Checklist
of

cad Issues would there?

Jason Martin wrote:

This is a little late to the game but it might still
help you out

Comments in-line:

Mark Middlebrook <mark.middlebrook@teamrioja.org> wrote in message

news:86rceb$i9b13@adesknews2.autodesk.com...

> I'm working on an article on CAD standards. I'd appreciate any feedback
on

> your experiences with them, including any of the following specifics:

>

> + Research: What resources did you find helpful (industry standards,
Web

> sites, print publications, etc.)?

>

Our CSG (Cad System Guideline) was first printed in July of 1992, and
at the

time industry cad standards were at a minimum.  We did base our
layer name

conventions on the AIA short version.  We're currently seeing
how much

trouble/time it will cost us to implement the national cad standards
(in

some form or another).

Our CSG TOC is as follows

    Introduction

    Revision History

    Index

Section 1 Project Organization

    Project Data

    The Background Concept

    Background Terminology

    Background Organization

Section 2 File Management

    Project Directory Structure

    Cad File Naming Formats

    Project File Management

    Project Archiving and Deliverables

Section 3 Cad Layer Standards

    Layer Naming Methodology

    Master Layer List

    Background Layer Groups

    Plotting and Pen Sizes

Section 4 Cad Drafting Standards

    Drawing Environment

    Text Styles

    Dimension Styles

    Sheet Numbering

    Match Lines

    Sheet Borders

    Annotation Symbols

    Scale Factor Chart

Section 5 Cad Procedures

    Cad Procedures

    Script Files for Master Backgrounds

    Changing Project Drawings

    Management Checklist of Cad Issues

    Project Review

    Transmitting Cad Files

    Softdesk Keyboard Macros

Section 6 Department Cad Procedures

    Design

    Architectural

    Structural

    Mechanical

    Electrical

    Civil

> + Development: How did you company go about the difficult process
of

coming

> up with standards? Major issues, disagreements, ways of coming to

> consensus..

We currently have a "CAD Team" in our office.  The cad team consists
of at

least one member of each department (design, arch, struc, elec, mech,
and

civil).  If there is a problem with the one of the disciplines
the others

basically beat on them until it is worked out.    There
are two IS guys that

regularly attend the meetings and try to "steer" everyone in a direction
and

keep the meetings under control.  Meetings are held every first
and third

monday of the month.

>

> + Implementation: Once you did come to some decision about what the

> standards should be, how did you implement them (documentation,

> customization, training, and enforcement)?

>

> + Documentation: How do you document your standards? Hardcopy (created
in

> what programs)? On-line (HTML, WinHelp, PDF)?

Currently the standards are only distributed in hardcopy format. 
Each

person in the office has a binder and anytime revisions are issued
that

persons binder is updated.  We are hoping that in the next year
to publish

them to our intranet so that updates will be easier.  We also
send out the

meeting notes of the CAD Team meetings to everyone in the office so
that

anyone that has a problem with what we are doing can talk to their

Disciplines cad coordinator.

>

> + Customization: Did you create or use template drawings, menu macros,

> AutoLISP programs, third party applications, etc. in order to help

automate

> standards compliance?

All of the above.  We use templates to set basic dim styles, text
style etc.

We've used softdesk since we started using autocad.  All of the
menu's are

customized, and we write lisp program to improve a number of other
tasks.

>

> + Enforcement: How do you try to get users to comply with CAD standards?

Peer pressure seems to work great.  Because of all the data sharing
that we

do between disciplines most of the time if you're doing something majorly

wrong the other disciplines know about and you will have a small crowd

around your desk quickly.  We also have a drawing review, that
must be

requested by the project manager.  The drawing review consists
of a

checklist (the checklist is in our CSG) that the cad

tech/engineer/architect/whatever uses to check their drawings against

certain parts of the cad standards.  At that point he/she is allowed
to make

any corrections to the drawings.  Once he/she is done the PM notifies

someone from IS, who also performes the checklist.

>

> + Revision: How often do you revise your standards? What level of

additional

> effort is involved?

Constantly.  We start at the beginning of the book and start reading
stuff.

If that's still the way that we do it then we generally leave it in. 
If a

lot of people don't do it there has to be a reason.  Is it to
hard to

understand?  Is it to hard to do?  Does it take to much time? 
Is it

actually needed?  Once we've gone through a chapter that chapter
is

generally re-published and we go on to the next one.  When we
get to the end

of the book we start over at the beginning

>

> These categories are just my first cut at breaking down the subject
into

> chunks that I can think and write about. Feel free to respond in
a more

> anecdotal way or to comment on just one or two categories.

>

> I'm especially interested in hearing from people outside the AEC

> professions, although I'm happy to hear from AEC folks, too.

>

> Thanks,

> Mark Middlebrook

> mark@markcad.com

>

>

hth

jason martin

frankfurt-short-bruza


*Middlebrook, Mark
Message 14 of 17 (44 Views)

Re:

02-03-2000 03:40 PM in reply to: *Middlebrook, Mark
Jason:

No, not too late. Thanks for taking the time to respond.

- Mark Middlebrook
*Martin, Jason
Message 15 of 17 (44 Views)

Re:

02-04-2000 06:49 AM in reply to: *Middlebrook, Mark
Sure - It doesn't contain everything that we'd like it to but at least it
does make the "non cad" PM types think about some of the issues that always
come up. This is pasted from a word doc, the format in plain text is a
little "lacking". Below that I've also included our Project Kickoff Meeting
agenda.

Management Checklist of CAD Issues

In order to improve project communications concerning CAD issues, the
follow-ing checklist of CAD decisions has been developed. The purpose of
this check-list is to assist project managers to ensure that CAD related
decisions are made in a timely manner. This is only a checklist - to get
further information about these issues, references to the appropriate page
of the CSG that has been in-cluded in parentheses.

Project Director

1. Meet with the Project Architect to discuss:
* Client specific CAD requirements (if any)
* Required project deliverables
* Required project schedule
* Plotting and Q.C. schedule
* Project phasing and packaging
* Coordination of plan sectoring
2. Determine any client specific drafting standards, such as:
* Keynotes (5-9)
* Title Block (4-18)
* Layout
* Revisions
* Sheet size
3. Set up the initial CAD coordination meeting, including the Design
department, to discuss the following:
* Items listed in #1 above
* Project origin point (5-6)
* Needs and timing of project archiving (2-13)
* Project folder structure (2-2)
* Project file naming conventions (2-5)
* Special needs for backgrounds and file sharing (1-8)
4. Oversee and direct the orderly transition from the Preliminary Design
phase to the Design Development phase:
* Project file archiving (2-13)
* Impact of late design changes
5. Oversee and direct the orderly transition from the Design Develop-ment to
the Construction Documents phase:
* Project file archiving (2-13)
* Impact of late design changes
6. Insure that Project Architect is having regular meetings with project's
CAD team.
7. Insure that Drawing lists are maintained by each discipline and that
project milestone archives are performed. (2-12, 2-13)
8. Insure that a final archive is performed and, if required, the electronic
version of project deliverables is prepared and submitted. (2-13, 2-14).

Project Architect / Engineer
(Person responsible for project production)

1. Meet with Project Director to discuss:
* Client specific CAD requirements.
* Required project deliverables
* Required project schedule
* Plotting and Q.C. schedule
* Project phasing and packaging
* Coordination of sectoring of plans
2. Organize periodic CAD production meetings and address the
following:
* Criteria for the items listed in #1 above
* Project origin point (5-6)
* Needs and timing for project archiving (2-13)
* Project file name convention (2-5)
* Project folder structure (2-2)
* Special needs for background and file sharing (1-8)
* CAD coordination between disciplines
* Project specific CAD production issues
3. Manage the orderly transition between the Preliminary Design phase and
the Design Development phase:
* Project file archiving (2-13)
* Impact of late design changes
4. Manage the orderly transition between the Design Development phase and
the Construction Documents phase.
5. Create and maintain the project border and sheet info files.
(4-18)
6. If you are the Project Architect, perform CAD Coordinator items listed
below.

CAD Coordinator

1. Develop and maintain project drawing list. (2-12)
2. Create and maintain project script files. (5-10)
3. Create and maintain project keynote database. (5-9)
4. Q.C. project CAD standards.

Project Kickoff Meeting Agenda
The following outline of CAD related topics has been developed to assist
man-agers in conducting the initial project kick-off meeting for the CAD
production team, and to ensure that CAD related decisions are made in a
timely manner. This is only a suggested agenda - further topics may be
warranted by specific projects.

1. Program Information
* To be distributed
2. Project Specific Requirements
* Project Deliverables - CD, 3 ½" Floppy, R12, R13, R14;
Reproducibles, Bluelines
3. Required Project Schedule and Deadlines
* Project Budget & Hours by Department (including CAD hours)
4. Coordination of Backgrounds
* Condition of Owner Database - Electronic problems or inaccuracies
* Directory Structure
* Softdesk Project Association
* File Naming
* Drawings Required - Drawing List (if available), Demo or Enlarged
Plans
* Status of Source Files - (are they to be used for
multiple/simultaneous projects?)
* Special Needs for Backgrounds and File Sharing
* Script File preparation
* Provide P.A. with Drawing List @ 35, 65, 95 & 100% for archiving
* CAD Coordination Between Disciplines
5. Project Specific CAD Production Issues
* Project Units
* Origin Points
* Match Lines
* Special Text Sizes
* Special Borders
* Sheet Border Date Handling
* Scales of Drawings
* Special Conditions / CSG Deviations
* Annotation Symbols - Detail/Section/Title Marks/North
Arrows/Graphic Scales/Construction Notes and Symbols
6. Project Team E-Mail List
* All team members should have E-Mail distribution list for all other
pro-ject team members, including the project discussion group.

hth

jason martin
frankfurt-short-bruza

Roger D. Shaw wrote in message
news:389A0EE9.D28C05E7@netjax.com...
> There wouldn't be a way we could see an example of your Management
Checklist of
> cad Issues would there?
*Shaw, Roger D.
Message 16 of 17 (44 Views)

Re:

02-04-2000 10:22 AM in reply to: *Middlebrook, Mark


Thanks Jason

Jason Martin wrote:

Sure -  It doesn't contain everything that we'd
like it to but at least it

does make the "non cad" PM types think about some of the issues that
always

come up.  This is pasted from a word doc, the format in plain
text is a

little "lacking".  Below that I've also included our Project Kickoff
Meeting

agenda.

Management Checklist of CAD Issues

In order to improve project communications concerning CAD issues, the

follow-ing checklist of CAD decisions has been developed. The purpose
of

this check-list is to assist project managers to ensure that CAD related

decisions are made in a timely manner. This is only a checklist - to
get

further information about these issues, references to the appropriate
page

of the CSG that has been in-cluded in parentheses.

Project Director

1. Meet with the Project Architect to discuss:

    *    Client specific CAD requirements
(if any)

    *    Required project deliverables

    *    Required project schedule

    *    Plotting and Q.C. schedule

    *    Project phasing and packaging

    *    Coordination of plan sectoring

2. Determine any client specific drafting standards, such as:

    *    Keynotes (5-9)

    *    Title Block (4-18)

    *    Layout

    *    Revisions

    *    Sheet size

3. Set up the initial CAD coordination meeting, including the Design

department, to discuss the following:

    *    Items listed in #1 above

    *    Project origin point  (5-6)

    *    Needs and timing of project
archiving  (2-13)

    *    Project folder structure 
(2-2)

    *    Project file naming conventions 
(2-5)

    *    Special needs for backgrounds
and file sharing  (1-8)

4. Oversee and direct the orderly transition from the Preliminary Design

phase to the Design Development phase:

    *    Project file archiving 
(2-13)

    *    Impact of late design changes

5. Oversee and direct the orderly transition from the Design Develop-ment
to

the Construction Documents phase:

    *    Project file archiving 
(2-13)

    *    Impact of late design changes

6. Insure that Project Architect is having regular meetings with project's

CAD team.

7. Insure that Drawing lists are maintained by each discipline and
that

project milestone archives are performed. (2-12, 2-13)

8. Insure that a final archive is performed and, if required, the electronic

version of project deliverables is prepared and submitted. (2-13, 2-14).

Project Architect / Engineer

(Person responsible for project production)

1. Meet with Project Director to discuss:

    *    Client specific CAD requirements.

    *    Required project deliverables

    *    Required project schedule

    *    Plotting and Q.C. schedule

    *    Project phasing and packaging

    *    Coordination of sectoring of
plans

2. Organize periodic CAD production meetings and address the

following:

    *    Criteria for the items listed
in #1 above

    *    Project origin point  (5-6)

    *    Needs and timing for project
archiving  (2-13)

    *    Project file name convention 
(2-5)

    *    Project folder structure 
(2-2)

    *    Special needs for background
and file sharing  (1-8)

    *    CAD coordination between disciplines

    *    Project specific CAD production
issues

3. Manage the orderly transition between the Preliminary Design phase
and

the Design Development phase:

    *    Project file archiving 
(2-13)

    *    Impact of late design changes

4. Manage the orderly transition between the Design Development phase
and

the Construction Documents phase.

5. Create and maintain the project border and sheet info files.

(4-18)

6. If you are the Project Architect, perform CAD Coordinator items
listed

below.

CAD Coordinator

1. Develop and maintain project drawing list. (2-12)

2. Create and maintain project script files. (5-10)

3. Create and maintain project keynote database. (5-9)

4. Q.C. project CAD standards.

Project Kickoff Meeting Agenda

The following outline of CAD related topics has been developed to assist

man-agers in conducting the initial project kick-off meeting for the
CAD

production team, and to ensure that CAD related decisions are made
in a

timely manner. This is only a suggested agenda - further topics may
be

warranted by specific projects.

1. Program Information

    *    To be distributed

2. Project Specific Requirements

    *    Project Deliverables - CD, 3
½" Floppy, R12, R13, R14;

Reproducibles, Bluelines

3. Required Project Schedule and Deadlines

    *    Project Budget & Hours by
Department (including CAD hours)

4. Coordination of Backgrounds

    *    Condition of Owner Database
- Electronic problems or inaccuracies

    *    Directory Structure

    *    Softdesk Project Association

    *    File Naming

    *    Drawings Required - Drawing
List (if available), Demo or Enlarged

Plans

    *    Status of Source Files - (are
they to be used for

multiple/simultaneous projects?)

    *    Special Needs for Backgrounds
and File Sharing

    *    Script File preparation

    *    Provide P.A. with Drawing List
@ 35, 65, 95 & 100% for archiving

    *    CAD Coordination Between Disciplines

5. Project Specific CAD Production Issues

    *    Project Units

    *    Origin Points

    *    Match Lines

    *    Special Text Sizes

    *    Special Borders

    *    Sheet Border Date Handling

    *    Scales of Drawings

    *    Special Conditions / CSG Deviations

    *    Annotation Symbols - Detail/Section/Title
Marks/North

Arrows/Graphic Scales/Construction Notes and Symbols

6. Project Team E-Mail List

    *    All team members should have
E-Mail distribution list for all other

pro-ject team members, including the project discussion group.

hth

jason martin

frankfurt-short-bruza

Roger D. Shaw <caddtech@netjax.com> wrote in message

news:389A0EE9.D28C05E7@netjax.com...

> There wouldn't be a way we could see an example of your Management

Checklist of

> cad Issues would there?


*Middlebrook, Mark
Message 17 of 17 (44 Views)

Re: CAD standards query

02-12-2000 09:33 AM in reply to: *Middlebrook, Mark
Thanks to everyone who replied to my query for CAD standards feedback. The
comments and discussion were most helpful. The article should appear in the
April isse of CADALYST.

- Mark Middlebrook

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