Reply
Active Contributor
arailAC
Posts: 32
Registered: ‎01-28-2011

$$$ question

601 Views, 11 Replies
04-02-2013 06:19 AM

There may be no answer to this question yet but -

 

Is fusion360 expected to become a $5000 software package like SW or a $1000 application like Rhino? I work in the $1000 dollar realm (AutoCAD LT, SketchUp, modo, Rhino, etc.). Much as I'm incredibly impressed with SolidWorks & Inventor I can't, as a one man operation, justify that kind of cost for a license.

 

I'm just beginning to learn fusion360 and I'm curious as to where the effort takes me - to a software that is in my budgetary realm or completely out of it?

 

Thanks in advance for any info you can provide

Please use plain text.
Active Contributor
LeonMF
Posts: 34
Registered: ‎02-14-2013

Re: $$$ question

04-02-2013 07:19 AM in reply to: arailAC

As a home user, using this product for 3D printing, this is a key question for me as well.  

 

I found 123D to be too limiting, Inventor Fusion to be too bug riddled (and too discontinued) and Inventor LT to be too PC based.  I'm willing to pay for a decent 3D design program that meets my needs and it looks like Fusion 360 will be that program.  I'm excited by the possibilities if I can afford it!

Please use plain text.
Member
j_morgan76
Posts: 7
Registered: ‎01-03-2013

Re: $$$ question

04-02-2013 01:07 PM in reply to: arailAC

I am wondering the same thing.. What is the price point of this software after beta testing is complete????

Please use plain text.
*Expert Elite*
cekuhnen
Posts: 879
Registered: ‎07-26-2012

Re: $$$ question

04-02-2013 05:38 PM in reply to: j_morgan76

Same for me. As a single person something in the range of Rhino is ok.

Please use plain text.
Employee
perrin_keith
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎09-07-2007

Re: $$$ question

04-05-2013 12:11 PM in reply to: arailAC

 

How much it's going to cost?

 

Good question... We've an opportunity to do something different than what's gone on traditionally with engineering software. We want to take that opportunity. There's more modern business models that we can adopt on the cloud that are more aligned to what our customers want.

 
Here's some of the options we've been thinking a lot about...
 
Free/Freemium, $50/month,  $100/month?
Monthly, Quarterly, Annual, Perpetual?
Bundled, Configurable, All in one?
User based (Tied to your account, not a computer, so you can get to your design anywhere)
Support/Service levels ?
 
What do you guys want?
 
 
Keith
(Bus Dvlpt @ADSK)

 

Please use plain text.
Contributor
Nicolinux
Posts: 24
Registered: ‎03-29-2013

Re: $$$ question

04-07-2013 04:35 PM in reply to: arailAC

It depends on the audience you want to target.

 

For example - I am a 3D printing enthusiast and would use Fusion 360 from time to time. A monthly service subscription would be the worst model for me. I would rather pay per "project storage space". You could allow one project with a limited number of designs per account for free and add a subscription fee for more "space". This way those willing to constantly delete designs in favor of new ones would profit from the attractive pricing (free...) while professional users would pay for project storage (and maybe other premium features).

 

Pricing is a very sensitive topic. It could make or break a service. But since I know that Autodesk sees a _HUGE_ opportunity in 3D printing my guess is that they will push services like Fusion 360 to drive their brand leadership in this field and thus lean towards "attractive pricing".

http://about.me/nicolinux
Please use plain text.
*Expert Elite*
Oceanconcepts
Posts: 538
Registered: ‎03-28-2013

Re: $$$ question

04-08-2013 02:55 PM in reply to: perrin_keith

I don't think you are going to find a "one size fits all' pricing solution, but that may not be necessary.  There are different potential user groups- look at their needs. And look at the long term.

 

We are a two person design operation, and we mainly focus on electronics and embedded software aspects of products which we develop speculatively. CAD is for us a very good thing to have, but not central. Having purchased in the past a $3K+ CAD package that fell by the wayside, I am not anxious to invest in another expensive CAD solution- there is already too much pricy software we must buy, learn, and maintain on the electronics side.  For us, the subscription model, if the cost is low- < $50/ month or so- would be an easy decision. It's a business expense for us, but our needs are very different from professional designers who will be using CAD tools every day.  We're a tiny business, and can't justify much cost- professional doesn't mean large enterprise, particularly now. I have access to the entire suite of Adobe products- another thing I use only occasionally and some of which I will never use- for $30/ month on a promotion, eventually it will be $50.  I think they hit it about right as to ease of use of the subscription system, regular automatic payments, and the option to suspend/ cancel at any time. Flexibility and user control are key. 

 

I much prefer a user based system, machine independent. Limit the number of nodes if you have to, or charge extra for more users, but don't tie it to a single CPU.  

 

But my needs aside, what I would hope for with Fusion is that it would attract a much broader group of users.  I think Fusion has an incredible opportunity with the small startup, hobbyist, inventor, woodworker, or other participants in the new economies and enterprises made possible by accessible rapid manufacturing (3D printing and CNC particularly).  That means an ultra low cost or free entry path and a real focus on educational materials. I would vote for a free level or at least a very extensive (like 6 months) free trial.  A lot of these folks will have had little or no prior experience with CAD.  They are not going to be buying a seat of SolidWorks, but might invest a lot of energy in learning a good tool they have access to- that process can create a lot of loyalty down the road. 

 

For other users, other benefits could be structured. There could be a path into higher end products, or different version of Fusion. There could be levels of storage, limits to the size of converted files, etc., but I believe the best long term strategy would be to develop a large and broad based pool of enthusiastic users as quickly as possible.

- Ron

27" iMac Core i5, OS 10.9.4, 8GB RAM
Please use plain text.
Employee
prabakarm
Posts: 30
Registered: ‎04-02-2003

Re: $$$ question

04-08-2013 05:42 PM in reply to: Nicolinux

Thanks for feedback.  Can you help us better understand why a monthly subscription model would not work for you?

Please use plain text.
Contributor
matthew.w
Posts: 25
Registered: ‎01-21-2004

Re: $$$ question

04-08-2013 11:10 PM in reply to: prabakarm

I think any existing autodesk subscription customer should have access with their subscription.
For those without subscription they should have free limited access (not sure what to limit on) or monthly/yearly subscription. Monthly would be good for transient users to pick it up when they need it. How would a time limited model work? (You could provide say 100 hours for $$ and when used up it stops loggin you on to create new?)

You need to be very careful with what happens when someone stops paying as they should still have acces to the data they have created.

 

Rambling thoughts of a reseller.

Matthew
matthew.w@cadpro.co.nz
+64 9 302 4028
Please use plain text.
Active Contributor
filiberti.design
Posts: 42
Registered: ‎09-30-2006

Re: $$$ question

04-09-2013 02:44 AM in reply to: matthew.w

The monthly subscription model might be to modulate. The free base, with a fair number of tools that allow a minimal model management so as to encourage new users.
The other modules should be consistent to a specialization of the possibilities ... for engineers (with expansion possibilities) for designers, rendering of different qualities, etc..

 

Fabio

Please use plain text.