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Active Member
benboubaker
Posts: 8
Registered: ‎04-21-2009

UNCOUPLED FLUID FLOW AND STEADY STATE HEAT TRANSFER

134 Views, 2 Replies
12-06-2012 08:13 AM

hello,

 

I runned a steady fluid flow to be able to transfer the forced convection file ds.sfv into my second design scenario that includes a steady state heat transfer. the solver is running now for 18 hours to verify model (too long)

i noticed that the steady state heat transfer scenario changed all  tetrahedra elements from fluid flow scenario to all bricks.

Is there problems?, so far there is no message for errors

 

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Active Member
benboubaker
Posts: 8
Registered: ‎04-21-2009

Re: UNCOUPLED FLUID FLOW AND STEADY STATE HEAT TRANSFER

12-06-2012 01:51 PM in reply to: benboubaker

I forgot to mention that the fluide (a modeled part simulating air in this case) is to cool down an assembly of power dissipating ships installed on a board and standoffs. according to the general procedure i have to check the entire assembly including the part representing the fluid to create elements and  nodes numbers. in the tutorial " PIPE TEE "

they do not check the fluid and pipe. after meshing, they suppress the non-fluid part and run the simulation.

Do i have to check the model before suppressing the non-fluid parts?

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Distinguished Mentor
AstroJohnPE
Posts: 514
Registered: ‎08-30-2012

Re: UNCOUPLED FLUID FLOW AND STEADY STATE HEAT TRANSFER

12-07-2012 12:17 PM in reply to: benboubaker

Hi Ben,

 

I do not understand which model is stuck in the verification. Is it the fluid model, the heat transfer model, or the combined model with all parts?

 

Also, you may want to try minimizing as many windows as possible. After they are minimized, click the Simulation Mechanical icon in the task bar to unminimize it. Sometimes a dialog is opened but is "in the background" waiting for you to click a button. Minimizing and unminimizing should bring the dialog to the front (if my memory is correct).

 

Another question just to clarify what is happening. When you run an analysis (or do a "Check Model"), the software generates the solid mesh if it has not been solid meshed previously. I do not recall how that information is presented, but solid meshing can take a long time in unusual situations, and it might be easy to overlook the fact that it is solid meshing instead of verifying the geometry.

 

To answer your last question, I think it is not necessary to do a check model on the complete assembly. As long as the surface mesh has been created on the entire assembly, you should be able to proceed with the suggestion of suppressing the solid parts, run the fluid analysis, copy the design scenario, invert which parts are suppressed, and run the thermal analysis.

 

 

John Holtz, PE
Mechanical Engineer
Pittsburgh, PA

16 years experience with Simulation Mechanical
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