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Distinguished Contributor
kwg06516
Posts: 192
Registered: ‎09-26-2008
Message 1 of 6 (425 Views)
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what drives the changes in these symbolic lines?

425 Views, 5 Replies
06-14-2013 08:41 AM

I'm teaching myself how to build families by reverse engineering existing families.  I was looking at the double uneven door in preparation for making my own.

 

I can't tell what is resizing the symbolic lines in plan view when I change either the doorway width or the large panel width.  I built a single door with an appropriately sized rough opening but I had to add all kinds of reference planes and parameters to get the plan view symbolic lines to move correctly.  How did they do it in the double uneven, especially the small panel.  It doesn't seem to have any parameters aside from one formula.

 


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It is subtle, but it´s simpler than it looks. In Revit, if "A" is constrained to "B", and "B" is constrained to "C", therefore "A" is constrained to "C".

 

In the case of a door swing: an arc needs a center point and a radius, no more. The center is at the intersection of a reference plane that is already constrained (Ref. plane "Left") and the face of the wall. The radius is at the intersection of another reference plane that is already constrained (Ref. plane "Center Left/Right), and the face of the wall. The distance between these two reference planes is already controlled by the "Width Large Panel" parameter. If the arc that represents the swing of the door goes in between these two intersections that are already constrained, no more parameters are needed for the swing to flex when these two reference planes are moved. Also, help yourself with the osnaps. It's not the same to indicate a point with an endpoint than with an intersection. In this case, draw the arc from intersection to intersection (SE to SE); that's good enough. :smileyhappy:

 

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Alfredo_Medina
Posts: 2,821
Registered: ‎06-11-2009
Message 2 of 6 (418 Views)

Re: what drives the changes in these symbolic lines?

06-14-2013 09:13 AM in reply to: kwg06516

It is subtle, but it´s simpler than it looks. In Revit, if "A" is constrained to "B", and "B" is constrained to "C", therefore "A" is constrained to "C".

 

In the case of a door swing: an arc needs a center point and a radius, no more. The center is at the intersection of a reference plane that is already constrained (Ref. plane "Left") and the face of the wall. The radius is at the intersection of another reference plane that is already constrained (Ref. plane "Center Left/Right), and the face of the wall. The distance between these two reference planes is already controlled by the "Width Large Panel" parameter. If the arc that represents the swing of the door goes in between these two intersections that are already constrained, no more parameters are needed for the swing to flex when these two reference planes are moved. Also, help yourself with the osnaps. It's not the same to indicate a point with an endpoint than with an intersection. In this case, draw the arc from intersection to intersection (SE to SE); that's good enough. :smileyhappy:

 

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Distinguished Contributor
kwg06516
Posts: 192
Registered: ‎09-26-2008
Message 3 of 6 (396 Views)

Re: what drives the changes in these symbolic lines?

06-14-2013 01:55 PM in reply to: Alfredo_Medina

On the first go around it failed.  Resizing the opening or the right hand panel would produce a set of constraint conflicts in the symbolic lines.  So I started a new model and tried not to constrain it with too many planes.  I drew the symbolic lines arcs first from center to strike to full extension of swing, locking all the padlocks.  Then I drew the door panel, this time as a rectangle, and left all the padlocks unlocked, and it worked perfectly.  Even though I didn't lock the door panel symbolic lines they move correctly when I resize the doorway.  Not sure if I understand why.

 

Thanks.

 


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*Expert Elite*
Alfredo_Medina
Posts: 2,821
Registered: ‎06-11-2009
Message 4 of 6 (373 Views)

Re: what drives the changes in these symbolic lines?

06-15-2013 02:41 PM in reply to: kwg06516

Notice that in my previous message, I don't recommend to use the pad locks for swing of the door.

 

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Distinguished Contributor
kwg06516
Posts: 192
Registered: ‎09-26-2008
Message 5 of 6 (342 Views)

Re: what drives the changes in these symbolic lines?

06-17-2013 08:57 AM in reply to: Alfredo_Medina

You didn't refer to padlocks at all in your previous post. But if I do understand you simply snapping to an intersection of two parametricly driven planes using the intersection snap(Sl, not SE) is sufficient to constrain whatever is drawn from that point?

 

Thank you.

 


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*Expert Elite*
Alfredo_Medina
Posts: 2,821
Registered: ‎06-11-2009
Message 6 of 6 (331 Views)

Re: what drives the changes in these symbolic lines?

06-17-2013 10:00 AM in reply to: kwg06516

Exactly. The key is in the first sentence of  one my previous posts. If the swing is made from the intersection of other elements that are already constrained, there is no need to lock them again. That actually creates an "overconstraint".

 

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