Revit Architecture

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texcarpenter
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎02-16-2009
Message 1 of 8 (2,744 Views)

Revit vs Chief Architect

2744 Views, 7 Replies
02-16-2009 04:02 PM
I am planning on buying a CAD package for my business. I an a builder whose largest project may be a 3000 sq ft house.

Is Revit overkill?

I am also looking a Chief Architect. I don't have a bias.

I don't mind making the invest in time to learn either product.

Also If I take an Autocad class, with that knowledge transfer to Revit?

Anybody have any thoughts?

Thanks,

Roy
Member
jfields2
Posts: 5
Registered: ‎02-03-2009
Message 2 of 8 (2,744 Views)

Re: Revit vs Chief Architect

02-16-2009 04:55 PM in reply to: texcarpenter
Dear Roy,
I believe it boils down to what you want and the time you want to spend working with the tools you get.
I am speaking from a viewpoint of AutoCAD since AutoCAD 12 in 1994 and Revit since 2004.
I don't know anything about Chief Architect.
If you want a quality product that will grow with you and keeps being upgraded I would choose Revit.
JSF
*Ted
Message 3 of 8 (2,744 Views)

Re: Revit vs Chief Architect

02-16-2009 05:58 PM in reply to: texcarpenter

Roy, if you would email me direct I might be able
to help...

tedhicks at bellsouth dot net

 

 


style="PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">
I
am planning on buying a CAD package for my business. I an a builder whose
largest project may be a 3000 sq ft house. Is Revit overkill? I am also
looking a Chief Architect. I don't have a bias. I don't mind making the invest
in time to learn either product. Also If I take an Autocad class, with that
knowledge transfer to Revit? Anybody have any thoughts? Thanks,
Roy
*Arthur MacLeod
Message 4 of 8 (2,744 Views)

Re: Revit vs Chief Architect

02-16-2009 06:59 PM in reply to: texcarpenter

If you are a builder and you plan to do your own
drawings, you should plan on making very little money. If you need drawings for
promotion of your work, hire an architect. Work out an arrangement with the
architect about your needs. Many architects will accomodate practical concepts
so long as they meet code. If you start drawing yourself, you will have less
time to do the things builders need to do. And, you won't attain CAD efficiency
because you will have to do to many other things. Some larger builders with a
sizable staff will hire a technician to take advantage of BIM scheduling,
phasing, and fitting in commercial and institutional projects. It doesn't make
sense for a house.

 

Arthur


style="PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">
I
am planning on buying a CAD package for my business. I an a builder whose
largest project may be a 3000 sq ft house. Is Revit overkill? I am also
looking a Chief Architect. I don't have a bias. I don't mind making the invest
in time to learn either product. Also If I take an Autocad class, with that
knowledge transfer to Revit? Anybody have any thoughts? Thanks,
Roy
Distinguished Contributor
vanderloo5
Posts: 152
Registered: ‎04-20-2008
Message 5 of 8 (2,744 Views)

Re: Revit vs Chief Architect

02-16-2009 08:16 PM in reply to: texcarpenter
Arthur,
I could not disagree with you more. Being a builder who also designs and drafts a lot of my own projects,
1. Has gotten me sooo many jobs over my competitors because my clients love a one stop shop where they can get from conceptual to finish with one person.
2. When the weather sucks around here, I stay as busy as I want. I have a nice warm office to come to, crank the tunes, and draw away.
Ya I'm never gonna get rich but then again, that was never on the top of my list of priorities.
Couldn't be happier!
*Joel
Message 6 of 8 (2,744 Views)

Re: Revit vs Chief Architect

02-17-2009 06:12 AM in reply to: texcarpenter
Just wanted to add...

Knowing AutoCAD won't help in Revit - in fact it will hurt. They are both
totally different programs that have totally different ways of doing
anything - even the few things (maybe 7 or 8) that are in common.

If you're leaning towards Revit, just learn Revit.
*clintonG
Message 7 of 8 (2,744 Views)

Re: Revit vs Chief Architect

02-17-2009 07:59 AM in reply to: texcarpenter
ROFL

I was a reseller of Chief Architect back in the day and I know something
about Revit too. My advice is to buy into Chief Architect --but-- I would
urge you to invest the time and money to find one or more builders that have
done so and determine if the shortcomings you will discover are those you
can live with as all software has its own way of doing things and in many
instances can catch you unprepared with a way to respond. Also learn how the
company has been responding to change the past couple of years. Even if you
have to go to the state next door. Contact the builder's association and
find a builder that has the same market and same type of product you are
delivering.

When I worked with CA (which was literally developed by a rocket scientist
during an earlier recession that killed the aerospace sectors) the company
was being controlled by a big fat ugly nasty woman who had no experience in
anything except we all suspected she played the Hollywood double for the
Wicked Witch of the West. Really it was painful but I hear she is now gone.

It is also little known that CA pioneered the way Revit works in 3D and drag
and draw and so on having been the software Revit was copied from before
Autodesk acquired it to ruin it even more ;-) I mean Revit has come into its
own for sure but it is extremely complex to learn and when all is said and
done Autodesk has too many product irons in the fire as the company operates
as a stock holding company and rarely produces quality software these days;
its products are perpetually buggy and incomplete. If there is a team of
victims around who can depend on one another its not so bad and on occasion
a helpful reseller can be found but for a one man band? Have you heard of
that place called hell?

CA remains a one trick pony and ART has had to try to do their utmost best
to remain a viable in their niche; residential design and build.
Get closer to some of your own peers and learn from them is my advice.

wrote in message
news:6125846@discussion.autodesk.com...
Arthur, I could not disagree with you more. Being a builder who also designs
and drafts a lot of my own projects, 1. Has gotten me sooo many jobs over my
competitors because my clients love a one stop shop where they can get from
conceptual to finish with one person. 2. When the weather sucks around here,
I stay as busy as I want. I have a nice warm office to come to, crank the
tunes, and draw away. Ya I'm never gonna get rich but then again, that was
never on the top of my list of priorities. Couldn't be happier!
*cdv
Message 8 of 8 (2,744 Views)

Re: Revit vs Chief Architect

02-17-2009 08:15 AM in reply to: texcarpenter

That's fine as long as the local jurisdication does
not require documents to prepared by or under the supervision
of a Licensed Professional Architect. Just depends on where one
practices or builds.

 

Craig D. VanDevere, AIA

 


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Arthur,
I could not disagree with you more. Being a builder who also designs and
drafts a lot of my own projects, 1. Has gotten me sooo many jobs over my
competitors because my clients love a one stop shop where they can get from
conceptual to finish with one person. 2. When the weather sucks around here, I
stay as busy as I want. I have a nice warm office to come to, crank the tunes,
and draw away. Ya I'm never gonna get rich but then again, that was never on
the top of my list of priorities. Couldn't be
happier!
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