Revit Architecture

Revit Architecture

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*John Story
Post 1 of 13

Revit Series or Revit..... too many choices....

312 Views, 12 Replies
12-18-2003 01:00 PM
I got the correct version last night for the upgrade to the seat we have now but have a question as to the best way to move forward from here to get more. I understand that there are essentially two versions now, one that is "standalone" called "Autodesk Revit 6.0" and one that is "AutoCAD Revit Series". So, beyond the obvious that AutoCAD is included in one, what specific differences are there between the two packages? A different installer implies that it is installing at least some other portions or linking somehow into AutoCAD or something. Does it link to that specific seat of AutoCAD? Please be specific. I am on the verge of transfering several unused seats of AutoCAD to one or the other, and the licenses will be networked for all seats obtained. My first impression would be to get the AutoCAD Revit Series, so I can still have the AutoCAD seats and the Revit seats, unless they are somehow tied to each other or cannot be network licensed. If this is the case, I will get the Autodesk Revit 6.0 and don't really need the excess AutoCAD if I am going to use Revit. Anyone? Thanks to all that help, John
Distinguished Contributor
486 Posts
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Registered: ‎10-22-2003
Post 2 of 13

Re: Revit Series or Revit..... too many choices....

12-18-2003 02:00 PM in reply to: *John Story
It's my limited understanding that the only difference between plain Revit, Revit series, and plain AutoCAD is in the network licensing. With plain Revit or AutoCAD, it's one network license = one running seat of the software. With the series, it's one network license = one seat of *either* AutoCAD or Revit running. So, in other words, you can only run one at a time and can't have, say, your friend use Revit while you use AutoCAD.

Other than that, the two software packages are identical.

The Revit series seems suited for firms like the one I work at that are in the progress of migration/upgrading, in that we want *both* AutoCAD 2004 & Revit, are currently on just an older AutoCAD, and don't have a lot of Revit knowlege in the firm just yet. If I was in your shoes, I might just go with Revit, unless you don't already have a copy of AutoCAD 2004 and need/want one.

Someone correct me if I'm wrong, please! :smileyhappy:
*Aaron Rumple
Post 3 of 13

Re: Revit Series or Revit..... too many choices....

12-18-2003 04:19 PM in reply to: *John Story
I'd go with just Revit. Even if you don't have AutoCAD. Once you are up to speed in Revit, you won't miss AutoCAD at all... "JeffreyMcGrew" wrote in message news:10192624.1071785175838.JavaMail.jive@jiveforum1.autodesk.com... > It's my limited understanding that the only difference between plain Revit, Revit series, and plain AutoCAD is in the network licensing. With plain Revit or AutoCAD, it's one network license = one running seat of the software. With the series, it's one network license = one seat of *either* AutoCAD or Revit running. So, in other words, you can only run one at a time and can't have, say, your friend use Revit while you use AutoCAD. > > Other than that, the two software packages are identical. > > The Revit series seems suited for firms like the one I work at that are in the progress of migration/upgrading, in that we want *both* AutoCAD 2004 & Revit, are currently on just an older AutoCAD, and don't have a lot of Revit knowlege in the firm just yet. If I was in your shoes, I might just go with Revit, unless you don't already have a copy of AutoCAD 2004 and need/want one. > > Someone correct me if I'm wrong, please! :smileyhappy:
*Greg Cashen
Post 4 of 13

Re: Revit Series or Revit..... too many choices....

12-18-2003 05:59 PM in reply to: *John Story
You can run both autocad and revit on the same machine at the same time. Just not on separate computers. "JeffreyMcGrew" wrote in message news:10192624.1071785175838.JavaMail.jive@jiveforum1.autodesk.com... > It's my limited understanding that the only difference between plain Revit, Revit series, and plain AutoCAD is in the network licensing. With plain Revit or AutoCAD, it's one network license = one running seat of the software. With the series, it's one network license = one seat of *either* AutoCAD or Revit running. So, in other words, you can only run one at a time and can't have, say, your friend use Revit while you use AutoCAD. > > Other than that, the two software packages are identical. > > The Revit series seems suited for firms like the one I work at that are in the progress of migration/upgrading, in that we want *both* AutoCAD 2004 & Revit, are currently on just an older AutoCAD, and don't have a lot of Revit knowlege in the firm just yet. If I was in your shoes, I might just go with Revit, unless you don't already have a copy of AutoCAD 2004 and need/want one. > > Someone correct me if I'm wrong, please! :smileyhappy:
*Mel Persin
Post 5 of 13

Re: Revit Series or Revit..... too many choices....

12-19-2003 03:29 AM in reply to: *John Story
My opinion valued a buck on today's market and inflation rate is you will still need AutoCAD for the next several years. You may not need every seat to have AutoCAD as you migrate your staff over to Revit. Yes Revit can do it all, but you still have staff in transition, outside consultants, clients and the construction community who will still cling to AutoCAD as we evolve building modeling with Revit. Do you need Revit series, not necessarily. If the plan is to migrate all of your AutoCAD, LT or ADT seats to Revit then you probably could work quite well with retaining your AutoCAD LT seats. Your not likely to be doing any 3D modeling or need 3rd party software API or program interfacing or need to program AutoCAD internally once you transition fully to Revit. Of course during the critical transition period to Revit and until all staff is trained and your appended standards to include Revit's building model process and methods is fully developed, you will still have seats of AutoCAD/ADT staff can use. But down the line, a year or slightly more, as Revit demonstrates to management and staff the ease of learning, opportunities during design, efficiency in production documentation and elimination of errors of drawing sheets, graphic and schedule coordination, your firm will shed the old legacy 2D CAD for Revit's Building Modeling and fully parametric database. AutoCAD will be unnecessary in your design and production process and a convenience to manage drawings received from outside resources or clean-up Revit's views exported to other CAD formats. -- Mel Persin, Architect-AIA Network/CAD Consultant, Support & Training "John Story" wrote in message news:3fe2156c$1_2@statler... > I got the correct version last night for the upgrade to the seat we have now > but have a question as to the best way to move forward from here to get > more. I understand that there are essentially two versions now, one that is > "standalone" called "Autodesk Revit 6.0" and one that is "AutoCAD Revit > Series". > > So, beyond the obvious that AutoCAD is included in one, what specific > differences are there between the two packages? A different installer > implies that it is installing at least some other portions or linking > somehow into AutoCAD or something. Does it link to that specific seat of > AutoCAD? Please be specific. > > I am on the verge of transfering several unused seats of AutoCAD to one or > the other, and the licenses will be networked for all seats obtained. My > first impression would be to get the AutoCAD Revit Series, so I can still > have the AutoCAD seats and the Revit seats, unless they are somehow tied to > each other or cannot be network licensed. If this is the case, I will get > the Autodesk Revit 6.0 and don't really need the excess AutoCAD if I am > going to use Revit. > > Anyone? > > Thanks to all that help, > John > >
*Aaron Rumple
Post 6 of 13

Re: Revit Series or Revit..... too many choices....

12-19-2003 06:26 AM in reply to: *John Story
I'm finding this not really true. I'd rather draft in Revit than AutoCAD even for 2D. I thought I'd need AutoCAD to transition my drawings, but as I've imported a lot of the office drawings into Revit - I'm shocked at how poorly drawn AutoCAD drawings are. Drawings I would look at in AutoCAD and consider "good" and "clean" are full of inaccuracies and garbage drawing. Cleanup is simpler in Revit than in AutoCAD. "Mel Persin" wrote in message news:3fe2e1bd$1_5@statler... > My opinion valued a buck on today's market and inflation rate is you will > still need AutoCAD for the next several years. You may not need every seat > to have AutoCAD as you migrate your staff over to Revit. Yes Revit can do > it all, but you still have staff in transition, outside consultants, clients > and the construction community who will still cling to AutoCAD as we evolve > building modeling with Revit. > > Do you need Revit series, not necessarily. If the plan is to migrate all of > your AutoCAD, LT or ADT seats to Revit then you probably could work quite > well with retaining your AutoCAD LT seats. Your not likely to be doing any > 3D modeling or need 3rd party software API or program interfacing or need to > program AutoCAD internally once you transition fully to Revit. > > Of course during the critical transition period to Revit and until all staff > is trained and your appended standards to include Revit's building model > process and methods is fully developed, you will still have seats of > AutoCAD/ADT staff can use. But down the line, a year or slightly more, as > Revit demonstrates to management and staff the ease of learning, > opportunities during design, efficiency in production documentation and > elimination of errors of drawing sheets, graphic and schedule coordination, > your firm will shed the old legacy 2D CAD for Revit's Building Modeling and > fully parametric database. > > AutoCAD will be unnecessary in your design and production process and a > convenience to manage drawings received from outside resources or clean-up > Revit's views exported to other CAD formats. > > -- > Mel Persin, Architect-AIA > Network/CAD Consultant, > Support & Training > > "John Story" wrote in message news:3fe2156c$1_2@statler... > > I got the correct version last night for the upgrade to the seat we have > now > > but have a question as to the best way to move forward from here to get > > more. I understand that there are essentially two versions now, one that > is > > "standalone" called "Autodesk Revit 6.0" and one that is "AutoCAD Revit > > Series". > > > > So, beyond the obvious that AutoCAD is included in one, what specific > > differences are there between the two packages? A different installer > > implies that it is installing at least some other portions or linking > > somehow into AutoCAD or something. Does it link to that specific seat of > > AutoCAD? Please be specific. > > > > I am on the verge of transfering several unused seats of AutoCAD to one or > > the other, and the licenses will be networked for all seats obtained. My > > first impression would be to get the AutoCAD Revit Series, so I can still > > have the AutoCAD seats and the Revit seats, unless they are somehow tied > to > > each other or cannot be network licensed. If this is the case, I will get > > the Autodesk Revit 6.0 and don't really need the excess AutoCAD if I am > > going to use Revit. > > > > Anyone? > > > > Thanks to all that help, > > John > > > > > >
*John Story
Post 7 of 13

Re: Revit Series or Revit..... too many choices....

12-19-2003 07:12 AM in reply to: *John Story
Jeff, Your understanding seems near to mine, I just wish that some "official" would make the differences clear. As you imply, this would mean that the new seats of AutoCAD and Revit from the series would not be licensed the same as the body of seats I already have in place. This would imply a new line item in the NLM licensing which means that the AutoCAD/Revit tied to these licenses would not respond to the licensing for the other non bundled seats. So, when you run out of regular AutoCAD seats, these bundled seats are not available as additionals to those users, only to those who have that specific version installed. The reverse is also true, 4 networked bundled licenses, install on 10 machines, first 4 win and get AutoCAD licenses and none of the others can roll into the other 50 networked AutoCAD licenses. So I guess we speculate until someone who knows for sure speaks up........ Thanks
Distinguished Contributor
486 Posts
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Registered: ‎10-22-2003
Post 8 of 13

Re: Revit Series or Revit..... too many choices....

12-19-2003 11:02 AM in reply to: *John Story
I actually draw more of my details in Revit now and export them, even for 100% AutoCAD jobs. With detail components and the smarter snapping/text controls it's way faster for me. Also you can draw something very detailed, like a wall section, and then take call-outs of it and turn those into AutoCAD exports to include as details within your AutoCAD set. I find myself doing more and more of this.

But I find that, due to the 'tower of babel' dwg format, that I still need AutoCAD around when dealing with legacy/outside problem files. This is due to the whole 'garbage-in-garbage-out' thing, for if you get a DWG file with things like 2D solids rather than hatches, lines with thicknesses and/or off z-plane in a 2D drawing, or more; those files will work a lot better to trace over the top of in Revit if they are cleaned up in AutoCAD first. Now just think about how screwed up the majority of DWG files are... scary...

So, if I was starting my own firm, I would just buy Revit, and demand that people send me 'clean' DWG files. But at a firm with a TON of legacy DWGs, most of which have SOME kind of problem/lack fo standards, I don't know how you would get by without AutoCAD...
*Mel Persin
Post 9 of 13

Re: Revit Series or Revit..... too many choices....

12-19-2003 11:45 AM in reply to: *John Story
Aaron, It's not about you (don't take this personally), me or any Reviteer who has master Revit to produce the building model, 2D detailing, importing and exporting to complete a set of construction drawings. Instead it is about a firms ability to transfer their AutoCAD/ADT seats to Revit, train their staff and modify their current practices and standards to enhance Revit's modeling and parametric benefits. You already know from your own experiences as a dealer and practicing professional that not every firm can will Revit into their practice ,nor convince their staff to change from what they already are secure in using or get them up and running (training) on Revit. In the larger architectural and engineering firms, just the act of getting IS and/or CAD management to upgrade programs without thorough testing, deployment plans, training and customization is a Herculean task resulting in delays of months To ask any firm to interrupt their work flow, even for greater benefit, is paramount to cash flow death and client deliverable delays. In any firm, greater than five CAD users, the ability to adopt better software or adapt to the coming changes in architectural services, slowly being ushered in by building modeling and parametric, is going to take several years. Until their is an cadre of knowledgeable and experienced Revit user's to meet the demands of the architectural and AEC communities workforce as there already exists for AutoCAD, transition will be steady, but slow. The success stories that some firms have published are only a glimpse of building modeling and the future of parametric. Since the majority of AEC firms will continue to use AutoCAD along with the myriad of consultants providing building design services, management will hold to perceptions that AutoCAD is still the glue between Revit and the rest of the CAD world. I would fully agree with you that doing the detailing in Revit is easy, better coordinated and controlled. But then those who started with Revit early on are the explorers (like Christopher Columbus or Colon as he was known) and you and I who came with Autodesk's adaptation of Revit pioneers, forging new pathways for our peers to follow. So let us all carve a new landscape for the practice of architecture and pave the way to a greater reward. -- Mel Persin, Architect-AIA Network/CAD Consultant, Support & Training From All of Us to All of You. This time of year brings out good cheer, For the Holidays and New Year. So let the festive spirit abound, And enjoy those loved that are around. Yet not forget those who cannot be, Who's love in past brought us glee. We wish you and your family all , The best of the Holidays about to call, A New Years throughout of good health, where deeds and love are measured wealth. That strife and hunger of nations cease, and all mankind enjoy a millennium of peace. "Aaron Rumple" wrote in message news:3fe30ae1_7@statler... > I'm finding this not really true. I'd rather draft in Revit than AutoCAD > even for 2D. I thought I'd need AutoCAD to transition my drawings, but as > I've imported a lot of the office drawings into Revit - I'm shocked at how > poorly drawn AutoCAD drawings are. Drawings I would look at in AutoCAD and > consider "good" and "clean" are full of inaccuracies and garbage drawing. > Cleanup is simpler in Revit than in AutoCAD. > > "Mel Persin" wrote in message > news:3fe2e1bd$1_5@statler... > > My opinion valued a buck on today's market and inflation rate is you will > > still need AutoCAD for the next several years. You may not need every > seat > > to have AutoCAD as you migrate your staff over to Revit. Yes Revit can do > > it all, but you still have staff in transition, outside consultants, > clients > > and the construction community who will still cling to AutoCAD as we > evolve > > building modeling with Revit. > > > > Do you need Revit series, not necessarily. If the plan is to migrate all > of > > your AutoCAD, LT or ADT seats to Revit then you probably could work quite > > well with retaining your AutoCAD LT seats. Your not likely to be doing > any > > 3D modeling or need 3rd party software API or program interfacing or need > to > > program AutoCAD internally once you transition fully to Revit. > > > > Of course during the critical transition period to Revit and until all > staff > > is trained and your appended standards to include Revit's building model > > process and methods is fully developed, you will still have seats of > > AutoCAD/ADT staff can use. But down the line, a year or slightly more, as > > Revit demonstrates to management and staff the ease of learning, > > opportunities during design, efficiency in production documentation and > > elimination of errors of drawing sheets, graphic and schedule > coordination, > > your firm will shed the old legacy 2D CAD for Revit's Building Modeling > and > > fully parametric database. > > > > AutoCAD will be unnecessary in your design and production process and a > > convenience to manage drawings received from outside resources or clean-up > > Revit's views exported to other CAD formats. > > > > -- > > Mel Persin, Architect-AIA > > Network/CAD Consultant, > > Support & Training > > > > "John Story" wrote in message news:3fe2156c$1_2@statler... > > > I got the correct version last night for the upgrade to the seat we have > > now > > > but have a question as to the best way to move forward from here to get > > > more. I understand that there are essentially two versions now, one that > > is > > > "standalone" called "Autodesk Revit 6.0" and one that is "AutoCAD Revit > > > Series". > > > > > > So, beyond the obvious that AutoCAD is included in one, what specific > > > differences are there between the two packages? A different installer > > > implies that it is installing at least some other portions or linking > > > somehow into AutoCAD or something. Does it link to that specific seat of > > > AutoCAD? Please be specific. > > > > > > I am on the verge of transfering several unused seats of AutoCAD to one > or > > > the other, and the licenses will be networked for all seats obtained. My > > > first impression would be to get the AutoCAD Revit Series, so I can > still > > > have the AutoCAD seats and the Revit seats, unless they are somehow tied > > to > > > each other or cannot be network licensed. If this is the case, I will > get > > > the Autodesk Revit 6.0 and don't really need the excess AutoCAD if I am > > > going to use Revit. > > > > > > Anyone? > > > > > > Thanks to all that help, > > > John > > > > > > > > > > > >
*Steve Stafford
Post 10 of 13

Re: Revit Series or Revit..... too many choices....

12-19-2003 03:30 PM in reply to: *John Story
They definitely are licensed differently, ARS is a product as is Revit. I too am waiting for word back on this issue before making a purchase decision. I really don't want to incur the hassle of installing both versions on each PC if that's what will be required or worse that I'll only be able to install one or the other like Autodesk did with Building Systems and ADT...marketing ideas need to be implemented sooner or later, it would be nice if they were as easy to implement as they sound good to buy. I need any potential user to be able to launch the Revit application and not wonder "which" icon to use... Here's hoping it's easy to mix em up. "John Story" wrote in message news:3fe3154c$1_4@statler... > Jeff, > > Your understanding seems near to mine, I just wish that some "official" > would make the differences clear. > > As you imply, this would mean that the new seats of AutoCAD and Revit from > the series would not be licensed the same as the body of seats I already > have in place. This would imply a new line item in the NLM licensing which > means that the AutoCAD/Revit tied to these licenses would not respond to the > licensing for the other non bundled seats. So, when you run out of regular > AutoCAD seats, these bundled seats are not available as additionals to those > users, only to those who have that specific version installed. The reverse > is also true, 4 networked bundled licenses, install on 10 machines, first 4 > win and get AutoCAD licenses and none of the others can roll into the other > 50 networked AutoCAD licenses. > > So I guess we speculate until someone who knows for sure speaks up........ > > Thanks > >
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