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autoMick
Posts: 257
Registered: ‎07-19-2012
Message 1 of 7 (594 Views)
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Infill wall between two roof levels

594 Views, 6 Replies
08-24-2013 11:31 PM

Hi, I can't seem to work out how to create a wall that infills the gable between two levels of the same roof. There is no internal wall below this location - so this would be some sort of lightweight studwork and panelling rather than brick. The picture probably explains my problem better.

Thanks

- Mick

 

Infill wall.jpg

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You can infill the space with a wall type. The trick is to attach the wall base to the lower roof and the wall top to the upper roof.

 

That works when your roofs overlap with your wall in plan (ie the wall has something to attach to below). More often than not though, your roof needs to stop before your wall (the wall element will probably continue on down until it meets a structural element such as a beam or steel rafter (or sometimes an internal wall type).

 

When there is limited overlap, I use a reference plane (or two). Pull up the section view, and place a reference plane in line with the lower and upper roofs - lock it to the roofs so that it adjusts with it.

 

You can then place your wall and either attach it to the reference planes top and bottom - or use a wall profile with the profile boundary locked to the reference planes. You can also use the same reference planes to lock a lower internal wall type to aswell.

Image 140.png

 

Of course is not a brick wall....Attach Top to Roof and Base to a Reference Plane. In order to use the Reference plane you have to work in a section view...

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awes
Posts: 128
Registered: ‎10-05-2011
Message 2 of 7 (582 Views)

Re: Infill wall between two roof levels

08-25-2013 12:23 AM in reply to: autoMick

Hi, can you please specify your question? Is it a structural or/and a Revit 'problem'. In my opinion we should first find a structural solution and then figure out the best way to model.

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constantin.stroescu
Posts: 1,026
Registered: ‎10-29-2008
Message 3 of 7 (579 Views)

Re: Infill wall between two roof levels

08-25-2013 12:26 AM in reply to: autoMick

is this what you want?

Image 139.png

Image 138.png

Constantin Stroescu
BIM Manager AGD
Mentor
autoMick
Posts: 257
Registered: ‎07-19-2012
Message 4 of 7 (562 Views)

Re: Infill wall between two roof levels

08-25-2013 01:37 AM in reply to: constantin.stroescu

Hi,

 

Awes - it's actually part of an existing house, which I'm modelling to plan extensions, but also as an exercise to learn revit properly. Structurally, I don't know how it was addressed as the detail is behind plaster, but there is a false ceiling under that location. I'm assuming there is some lightweight studwork building off the floating ceiling up to the top roof. So thinking through the process, I guess I would add the false ceiling as a level definition for the base and attach the wall to the upper roof as normal. Is this the best way?

 

Constantanin - yes that's what I'm after, although the actual finish would be lightweight panelling rather than brick/block work. In this second scenario, structurally, this might consist of vertical framing fixed directly to the roofing rafters (at top and bottom of the infill wall), then covered by cladding. In this case, it wouldn't rely on a false ceiling below. Is there a way to achieve this quickly, so that the wall has a sloping base and still finds the upper roof, without doing what I described above?

 

Thanks

 

- Mick

 

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MKEllis
Posts: 227
Registered: ‎03-02-2013
Message 5 of 7 (552 Views)

Re: Infill wall between two roof levels

08-25-2013 02:19 AM in reply to: autoMick

You can infill the space with a wall type. The trick is to attach the wall base to the lower roof and the wall top to the upper roof.

 

That works when your roofs overlap with your wall in plan (ie the wall has something to attach to below). More often than not though, your roof needs to stop before your wall (the wall element will probably continue on down until it meets a structural element such as a beam or steel rafter (or sometimes an internal wall type).

 

When there is limited overlap, I use a reference plane (or two). Pull up the section view, and place a reference plane in line with the lower and upper roofs - lock it to the roofs so that it adjusts with it.

 

You can then place your wall and either attach it to the reference planes top and bottom - or use a wall profile with the profile boundary locked to the reference planes. You can also use the same reference planes to lock a lower internal wall type to aswell.

*Expert Elite*
constantin.stroescu
Posts: 1,026
Registered: ‎10-29-2008
Message 6 of 7 (549 Views)

Re: Infill wall between two roof levels

08-25-2013 02:24 AM in reply to: autoMick

Image 140.png

 

Of course is not a brick wall....Attach Top to Roof and Base to a Reference Plane. In order to use the Reference plane you have to work in a section view...

Constantin Stroescu
BIM Manager AGD
Mentor
autoMick
Posts: 257
Registered: ‎07-19-2012
Message 7 of 7 (527 Views)

Re: Infill wall between two roof levels

08-25-2013 03:12 AM in reply to: constantin.stroescu

Thankyou MKEllis and Constantin, yes - the reference plane method is exactly what I was after. I hadn't come across this yet.... a lot to learn !

Regards

- Mick

Infrastructure Design Suite Premium 2015 SP1
Self-built i7-3930K, 16Gb RAM, P9X79 m/board
SSD(system), HDD(data), Win7Pro64, Quadro K4000 (and another with GTX680)
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