Revit Architecture

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Valued Mentor
vector2
Posts: 2,058
Registered: ‎03-28-2009
Message 11 of 42 (417 Views)

Re: Import CAD

01-12-2010 12:10 AM in reply to: RBartsch
Vector4u-

i think i have an idea to help AutoCAD drafters
stay in the game..

let them be responsible for making DWG files
"revit-ready"..

if they just give us a bunch of crap for drawing
files that messes up revit- then they will be putting
themselves out of the line drawing business..

you think?
Active Member
mikemcculley5692
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎12-02-2009
Message 12 of 42 (417 Views)

Re: Import CAD

02-18-2010 11:32 AM in reply to: RBartsch
To all...

While I respect the revit bunch, I can't help but wonder how you think a property survey or a topographic survey can be drafted in revit. There will always be a need for a cad type program for those of us who provide these services. Do any of you know how to correctly prepare a 3D surface from ground data? I know you can build topology in revit, but there is not any room for editing. If I were to provide you with a detailed topographic survey for use in a site design and you discarded my data, scanned and traced the information to use for design, you are assuming all of the risk. Autodesk/Autocad should have made the import of a dwg file a simple task.


Just a Surveyor's point of view.
Valued Mentor
vector2
Posts: 2,058
Registered: ‎03-28-2009
Message 13 of 42 (417 Views)

Re: Import CAD

02-18-2010 02:22 PM in reply to: RBartsch
mike-

revit is called "revit architecture" or
"revit building"..

revit is only for the building..

but since roads and land do lead up to
buildings- we need to link those drawing
files to our buildings for context..

we are happy that the people who draw
roads and land using AutoCAD are happy
with AutoCAD- but it really doesn't matter
to us what program they use to draw their
lines.. pencil lines that we can scan into a
revit site plan for linking to our building file
would be fine too..


Edited by: Discussion_Admin on Feb 18, 2010 5:25 PM
Valued Mentor
vector2
Posts: 2,058
Registered: ‎03-28-2009
Message 14 of 42 (417 Views)

Re: Import CAD

02-20-2010 04:38 AM in reply to: RBartsch
"how efficient and accurate is that" ??

just so this thread doesn't get too far away before we
get somebody who thinks they know a better way
to bring DWG lines into revit- i say- anything other
than a DWG site plan because that can be imported
into a separate session of revit and "revitized" and
then linked to the project- i say the best way to get
any kind of DWG line objects into a revit project
is to bring those lines in as a jpeg image and trace
over them and when you are done with the image-
delete it.. also- and like i said before- i don't know
about bringing DWG lines into a separate session
of revit and the family editor to make detail items
and components- (other than an image)- but if that
can somehow speed up anything and somebody
feels good doing that- then it could be doable- but
still i wouldn't do it..

i don't want to hear any more rants about it-
i want to hear some logical reason why you
think some other way is better..
*Matt Stachoni
Message 15 of 42 (417 Views)

Re: Import CAD

02-20-2010 06:51 PM in reply to: RBartsch
On Sat, 20 Feb 2010 15:51:07 -0800, vector2 <> wrote:

>"how efficient and accurate is that" ??

>i say the best way to get
>any kind of DWG line objects into a revit project
>is to bring those lines in as a jpeg image and trace
>over them and when you are done with the image-

>i don't want to hear any more rants about it-
>i want to hear some logical reason why you
>think some other way is better..

How about: Bringing in CAD linework as a bitmap image is incredibly inefficient.

It makes a whole lot more sense to me to simply link the DWG in, trace it using
Revit's easy to use toolset, then detach the original DWG.

That way you have the CAD linework to use, without any of the problems with
importing it.

Matt
matt@stachoni.com
Valued Mentor
vector2
Posts: 2,058
Registered: ‎03-28-2009
Message 16 of 42 (417 Views)

Re: Import CAD

02-20-2010 07:27 PM in reply to: RBartsch
Matt-
I want to study
careful what you are saying about DWG
importing.. Edited by: Discussion_Admin on Feb 22, 2010 11:15 AM
*The Dark Princess
Message 17 of 42 (417 Views)

Re: Import CAD

02-20-2010 11:08 PM in reply to: RBartsch
I have a lisp that takes acad survey and creates all 3d points necessary for
revit to create topography in seconds and far more accurately than you or
anyone else could using a raster image which is of ridiculously poor quality
dfor serious work. I assume you do only schematic and design development in
revit 'cause from what I see your knowledge ends at 25% dd and that's being
generous.

oh, and the lisp I mentioned. it creates the topgraphy in 5 seconds. for
50,000 data points

and no, you will never see it.


--
TDP

First things first, but not necessarily in that order.

The Doctor
wrote in message news:6341023@discussion.autodesk.com...
Matt-

you're better off staying one step behind
me in your understanding of anything- rather
than putting your foot in your mouth.. LOL

anyway- yeah- thanks- i want to study
careful what you are saying about DWG
importing..
Valued Mentor
vector2
Posts: 2,058
Registered: ‎03-28-2009
Message 18 of 42 (417 Views)

Re: Import CAD

02-20-2010 11:35 PM in reply to: RBartsch
TDP-

are you saying this "lisp" takes the place of linking or importing
DWG data into revit?

and how would that make it easier to copy details into revit?
Valued Mentor
vector2
Posts: 2,058
Registered: ‎03-28-2009
Message 19 of 42 (417 Views)

Re: Import CAD

02-20-2010 11:43 PM in reply to: RBartsch
"incredibly inefficient"?

maybe somebody should actually try bringing
a DWG detail into revit as an image for tracing
and see how easy it is- vs. muddying-up the
project file with DWG data..

and why would revit want to use those sloppy old
hand drawn lines from AutoCAD exactly the way
they are anyway?

people are just not thinking- they never do..

see the image..
*Expert Elite*
Alfredo_Medina
Posts: 2,821
Registered: ‎06-11-2009
Message 20 of 42 (417 Views)

Re: Import CAD

02-21-2010 06:35 AM in reply to: RBartsch
Dear Vector2

What our friend is saying about a Lisp routine that does the job of creating the topography is true. I wrote one for me, too, and I explain its use to my students in my courses. Revit provides 3 ways of making a site: 1) By manually adding points with elevations , 2) By importing a drawing, and 3) By reading a list of points.

The method that you are proposing (tracing over) has to do with option # 1, but it will be extremely awkward to trace over an image of a site plan, not only painfully slow and inaccurate, but also risky and unprofessional. Have you really tried? Those plans have some difficult curves, it will be a nightmare to trace it over, don't even suggest that.

Option # 2, importing a drawing; you bring a 3D wireframe of a site plan, and then tell Revit to use that import to create the topography. Once created, you may erase the imported drawing. Nothing wrong with that, if it works.

The other option, # 3, is the one that works with the Lisp routine. This option has the advantage that you don't need to import any CAD drawing, which is what you and others are against to. All you need is some previous work in AutoCAD before going into Revit. In AutoCAD, you need a 3D wireframe of your site plan; have all the contours elevated as per the actual elevations. Then, in AutoCAD, you run the Lisp routine. It only takes seconds to generate a list of all the x,y,z coordinates of the first and endpoint of every line or polyline segment. The routine saves the list in a .txt file. Then close AutoCAD, go to Revit > Site view > Massing and Site tab > Toposurface > Create from import > Specify points file > select the .txt file created by the Lisp routine > and Voilá! ...your topography is created in an instant. The result is accurate, since it is created with actual coordinates. Now compare this with tracing over an image!

Alfredo Medina
Online training of
AutoCAD & Revit Architecture
www.planta1.com
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