Revit Architecture

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*Rui Dias
Message 1 of 6 (512 Views)

Generative Components and more...

512 Views, 5 Replies
10-06-2004 06:07 AM
Will Revit 7.0 be able to do something similar to the Generative Components of Bentley? I know that there is still no schedule for Bentley to release this but is Revit/Autodesk looking into incorporanting these kind of funcionalities in Revit? If not does Autodesk have a dedicated package for this that can or will be able to work together with Revit? I am looking forward to push BIM in the office so I am looking at a different number of options. I have used Revit before in the 4.0 version and loved it. The issue is that we use Microstation. Before Revit was bought by Autodesk, it put dgn or dwg in the same level of importance. Later I had a look at version 5.0 and it was stillable to translate DGNs. My question is: Will I be able to use Revit together with Microstation? What kind of problems will I encounter? Thank you, Rui Dias p.s.- I've seen the pics from v7.0. When did you say it will be available for download? 20 days from now right?
Distinguished Contributor
Steve_Stafford
Posts: 572
Registered: ‎12-20-2001
Message 2 of 6 (512 Views)

Re: Generative Components and more...

10-06-2004 07:44 AM in reply to: *Rui Dias
Revit still supports Microstation dgn in the same fashion as you experienced before. I suspect that with Microstation's claim to be able to offer direct access to a dwg file that the future will focus more on exporting to dwg. Expecting the Microstation user to work with that file type, because they can. (to what degree that is true I'm not sure at the moment)

We don't know yet if the next release will feature something specifically like generative components. That said, you can still get a lot of work done without that concept in Revit now.

Revit's best interaction with Microstation is to provide 2D backgrounds for Microstation based consultants. Microstation users don't have any practical way to access the Revit model directly.

Revit data can be exported to an ODBC compliant database and then Microstation can link to this ODBC data to provide some "intelligence" to dgn based data. But that will take a lot of time and effort by someone who really understands how Microstation interacts with external databases. (not many architects I know use this part of Microstation at all)

The goal should be to see if Revit can improve your firms process, design philosophy and financial objectives...to name just a few things. If it can, then moving away from Microstation entirely is the best course, perhaps? Waiting for Bentley to figure out what architects want may take some time. I spent more time than I cared to, waiting...then moved on...

Good luck!
*Rui Dias
Message 3 of 6 (512 Views)

Re: Generative Components and more...

10-08-2004 02:34 AM in reply to: *Rui Dias
Thank you Steve, Three further questions: 1 - We are designing a curved glass canopy for a bus station in curved steel columns and glass. It is possible that we will introduce revit in the office with this job and I will be responsible for running it. My question is: Will revit be abble to respond to a design like this, in a comprehensive way? I have looked at some gallery examples but did not find something quite like it. I'm asking this because I don't want to commit with something and then find it hard to deliver. The issue of being compreehnesive is important so that other people less interested in changing can understand that it won't be such a hard thing to do. 2 - Can I save or export STL files. The question here is: will I be able to writte a file that can be read by a rapid-prototiping software or will I have to first export in DXF or DWG to, for example, Rhino so that I can then writte my STL file. 3 - The same question applies when acquiring geometries. Can I digitize directly to Revit or I have first to go trhough Rhino? Kind Regards, Rui Dias
*matthew jezyk [autodesk]
Message 4 of 6 (512 Views)

Re: Generative Components and more...

10-09-2004 12:14 PM in reply to: *Rui Dias
Hi Rui, In response to your first questions: > Will Revit 7.0 be able to do something similar to the Generative Components of Bentley? ... is Revit/Autodesk looking into incorporanting these kind of funcionalities in Revit? Take a look at the Family Editor. Revit has been able to make Parametric Components since Revit 1.0 (and we have added some significant improvements in each release since). The Family Editor allows you to create parametric building components simply by sketching and dimensioning geometry - no programming needed. You can drive the forms in interesting ways by creating various kinds of constraints and linking them together through formulas. Try it out if you have not already! If you have something specific you are trying to build, post an example and Revit users will usually help you figure out the best way to build it. If you are interested, take a look at this link: http://www.fabrication.ald.utoronto.ca/workshops/revit/revit.htm - we'll be doing a hands-on workshop on Revit 7 in a few weeks. In response to your second set of questions: 1) Please post some images of your design. It sounds interesting - I'm pretty sure it can be built in Revit from your description. Also, it you are looking for examples of expressive geometry please take a look at some of the examples posted in the AUGI forums (search especially for Phil Read's posts!) 2) Revit cannot currently write out STL files natively but revit geometry is pretty 'watertight' already so you should not have that many issues when you export. You should be able to import a revit exported dwg/dxf into rhino, acad or 3dstudio max and then export stl files. Out of curiosity, what sort of rapid prototyping do you do currently? 3) When you say digitize, to you mean from a 3d digitizer? Revit does not support them natively but can import geometry from other apps after you digitize. Revit 6.1 can import 3d faces and polymeshes from dwg/dxf/dgn. In Revit 7.0, we added the ability to import ACIS entities as well. matt jezyk product designer autodesk revit "Rui Dias" wrote in message news:41665fcf$1_3@newsprd01... > Thank you Steve, > > Three further questions: > > 1 - We are designing a curved glass canopy for a bus station in curved steel > columns and glass. It is possible that we will introduce revit in the > office with this job and I will be responsible for running it. > > My question is: Will revit be abble to respond to a design like this, in a > comprehensive way? I have looked at some gallery examples but did not > find something quite like it. > I'm asking this because I don't want to commit with something and then find > it hard to deliver. > The issue of being compreehnesive is important so that other people less > interested in changing can understand that it won't be such a hard thing to > do. > > > 2 - Can I save or export STL files. The question here is: will I be able to > writte a file that can be read by a rapid-prototiping software or will I > have to first export in DXF or DWG to, for example, Rhino so that I can then > writte my STL file. > > 3 - The same question applies when acquiring geometries. Can I digitize > directly to Revit or I have first to go trhough Rhino? > > > Kind Regards, > > Rui Dias > >
*Frame
Message 5 of 6 (512 Views)

Re: Generative Components and more...

10-12-2004 02:07 PM in reply to: *Rui Dias
I recently saw a presentation of the generative components, and one example was a hyperbolic shape that could be manipulated using controls. It looked and sounded great until the developer explained it took some PHD student a semester to program the thing. I have no problem with programming, but to expect architects to pick up the language of CS is a bit too much to ask. Computer Science has appropriated the term "architect", however, is it inevitable that architects appropriate the term programmer? Yes, we all work with a "program" in more ways than one, but the program, as a set of instruction, or rules, is not the architecture. The architect demands ability to freely manipulate and experiment with form; the parameterization of form needs to be as intuitive as drawing freely with the hand, or modeling with chipboard and bass wood, or even clay. "matthew jezyk [autodesk]" wrote in message news:41683881_1@newsprd01... > Hi Rui, > > In response to your first questions: > > Will Revit 7.0 be able to do something similar to the Generative > Components of Bentley? ... is Revit/Autodesk looking into incorporanting > these kind of funcionalities in Revit? > > Take a look at the Family Editor. Revit has been able to make Parametric > Components since Revit 1.0 (and we have added some significant improvements > in each release since). The Family Editor allows you to create parametric > building components simply by sketching and dimensioning geometry - no > programming needed. You can drive the forms in interesting ways by creating > various kinds of constraints and linking them together through formulas. Try > it out if you have not already! If you have something specific you are > trying to build, post an example and Revit users will usually help you > figure out the best way to build it. > > If you are interested, take a look at this link: > http://www.fabrication.ald.utoronto.ca/workshops/revit/revit.htm - we'll be > doing a hands-on workshop on Revit 7 in a few weeks. > > In response to your second set of questions: > > 1) Please post some images of your design. It sounds interesting - I'm > pretty sure it can be built in Revit from your description. Also, it you are > looking for examples of expressive geometry please take a look at some of > the examples posted in the AUGI forums (search especially for Phil Read's > posts!) > > 2) Revit cannot currently write out STL files natively but revit geometry is > pretty 'watertight' already so you should not have that many issues when you > export. You should be able to import a revit exported dwg/dxf into rhino, > acad or 3dstudio max and then export stl files. Out of curiosity, what sort > of rapid prototyping do you do currently? > > 3) When you say digitize, to you mean from a 3d digitizer? Revit does not > support them natively but can import geometry from other apps after you > digitize. Revit 6.1 can import 3d faces and polymeshes from dwg/dxf/dgn. In > Revit 7.0, we added the ability to import ACIS entities as well. > > matt jezyk > product designer > autodesk revit > > > "Rui Dias" wrote in message > news:41665fcf$1_3@newsprd01... > > Thank you Steve, > > > > Three further questions: > > > > 1 - We are designing a curved glass canopy for a bus station in curved > steel > > columns and glass. It is possible that we will introduce revit in the > > office with this job and I will be responsible for running it. > > > > My question is: Will revit be abble to respond to a design like this, in a > > comprehensive way? I have looked at some gallery examples but did not > > find something quite like it. > > I'm asking this because I don't want to commit with something and then > find > > it hard to deliver. > > The issue of being compreehnesive is important so that other people less > > interested in changing can understand that it won't be such a hard thing > to > > do. > > > > > > 2 - Can I save or export STL files. The question here is: will I be able > to > > writte a file that can be read by a rapid-prototiping software or will I > > have to first export in DXF or DWG to, for example, Rhino so that I can > then > > writte my STL file. > > > > 3 - The same question applies when acquiring geometries. Can I digitize > > directly to Revit or I have first to go trhough Rhino? > > > > > > Kind Regards, > > > > Rui Dias > > > > > >
*Rui Dias
Message 6 of 6 (512 Views)

Re: Generative Components and more...

10-27-2004 01:33 AM in reply to: *Rui Dias
Matthew, Thank you for your invitation for the Toronto workshop. I knew about it for some time. Unfortunately I'm based in London and will not be able to attend :smileysad: Look forward for one in London. Or somewhere in Erope for that matter. Regarding your query about what rapid-prototyping we use, currently none. I was asked to search and implement new tools and procedures in this office precisely because of that. Search is about design tools and rapid-prototyping. I have worked with rapid-prototyping before though. I used a 3-axis CNC milling machine from Spline systems (Delft, Netherlands). I'm looking for something different this time. Regarding digitizing, yes, I mean 3D digitizer. Geometry was imported into Rhino and worked in Maya. But neither Rhino or Maya are architecture oriented, unlike Revit. I am looking into the possibility of establishing a workflow with Revit in between. I'm glad to hear about the Parametric Components. I suspected Revit would be able to handle it. The short description you did about it, seems to be a user friendly feature. Like "Frame" well said, I don't want to take a PhD to be able to work with it. I will give it a closer look soon. Kind regards, Rui Dias
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