Inventor General Discussion

Inventor General Discussion

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duncan
Posts: 434
Registered: ‎02-24-2004
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iSkeleton

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11-13-2013 01:54 AM

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I’ve done a very quick search for iSkeleton and only found the following

iSketches and iSkeletons - The basics 

 

I’m interested in other people’s views in using existing methodologies in a new manner. I’d like to hear people views and comments, does this concept have potential?

 

I presume everybody using this forum knows how to use Skeletal Sketches, if not; there is information in the Help.

 

When I start putting the Assembly together from the parts made from a Skeletal Sketch I usually put the Skeletal Sketch part in first, turn off its visibility and change its BoM characteristics.

 

This brings two benefits; I can access the Skeletal Sketch quickly and easily as well as being able to use, Assembly → Productivity → Place at Component Origin function.

 

 

It dawned on me that I could convert the Skeletal Sketch part to an iPart and convert the Assembly to an iAssembly. The iAssembly table then just needs to access the iSkeleton table via Table Replace.

 

This would give you access to the Skeleton parameters in a General Table when creating the IDW/DWG drawing.

 

As you do not need to create loads of child parts from the iPart parent, which then do not need to be accessed by Inventor you reduce Inventor’s need for resources, such as hard-drive and RAM.

 

Obviously, I haven’t fully checked or tested this methodology and I don’t believe it will be suitable to all situations and circumstances. However, I’m sure that this, if developed a bit further, will be of benefit in some situations and circumstances, such as when only a manufacturing drawing is needed with a link table and there is no need for all the child parts.

 

Opinions and comments welcome.

 

 

Duncan Anderson

"Humour is one man shouting gibberish in the face of authority, and proving by fabricated insanity that nothing could be as mad as what passes for ordinary living." {Terence 'Spike' Milligan KBE (16 Apr 1918 – 27 Feb 2002)}
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