Inventor General Discussion

Inventor General Discussion

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New Member
hoobas007
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎05-03-2012
Message 1 of 3 (1,031 Views)
Accepted Solution

Autodesk Inventor Simulation True Stress - Strain Curve

1031 Views, 2 Replies
05-03-2012 01:26 PM

Hello,

I'm having a try with the inventor simulation and i realized that it doens't use the real stress-strain curve of materials. By this being so, all the stress results pass largely beyond the ultimate strenght of materials. Is there a way of introduzing this curves in autodesk? There is softwares that have this ability, like Solidworks, so there must be a way in Inventor. Could please somebody tell me how to do it.

Thanks 

Hi hobbes,

 

  By design the Stress Analysis in Inventor is linear.  If you need a non-linear analysis we recommend using Autodesk Mechanical Simulation.  More info available here: http://usa.autodesk.com/adsk/servlet/item?siteID=123112&id=8909451

 

  There are other assumptions to the linear FEA used in Inventor, most of which are listed here: http://usa.autodesk.com/adsk/servlet/ps/dl/item?siteID=123112&id=7263238&linkID=9242018

 

====  Copy / pasted here for your convenience=================================

Stress analysis assumptions

Issue

Stress analysis is used to solve linear, static problems. Although many engineering components fall into this problem category, there may be situations where the linear, static analysis assumptions do not apply.
 

Solution

Linear, static stress analysis assumptions are as follows:

  • The deflection and stress are linearly proportional to the load. If you double the load, the deflection and stress double.
  • Material properties are linear. The stress-strain curve is a straight line with the stress remaining proportional to the strain. There is no yielding of the material.
  • The loading is static and it is applied slowly. Dynamic loading effects, such as a sudden load application or impact, are not considered.
  • Temperature has no affect on the part geometry or material properties.
  • The deformation of the part is small compared to the dimensions of the part. Large deflection requires a nonlinear analysis to account for changing part and load geometry, and it is not considered during linear analysis.
  • Buckling is not a concern.

If you have a problem where these assumptions are not valid, you can either upgrade to the full analysis software package or pass the problem on to an analyst who is equipped to deal with it.

===============================================================

 

 

[Edit: Please let us know if you have additional questions or comments.]

 

Best regards, -Hugh

Employee
henderh
Posts: 651
Registered: ‎06-07-2007
Message 2 of 3 (1,028 Views)

Re: Autodesk Inventor Simulation True Stress - Strain Curve

05-03-2012 02:48 PM in reply to: hoobas007

Hi hobbes,

 

  By design the Stress Analysis in Inventor is linear.  If you need a non-linear analysis we recommend using Autodesk Mechanical Simulation.  More info available here: http://usa.autodesk.com/adsk/servlet/item?siteID=123112&id=8909451

 

  There are other assumptions to the linear FEA used in Inventor, most of which are listed here: http://usa.autodesk.com/adsk/servlet/ps/dl/item?siteID=123112&id=7263238&linkID=9242018

 

====  Copy / pasted here for your convenience=================================

Stress analysis assumptions

Issue

Stress analysis is used to solve linear, static problems. Although many engineering components fall into this problem category, there may be situations where the linear, static analysis assumptions do not apply.
 

Solution

Linear, static stress analysis assumptions are as follows:

  • The deflection and stress are linearly proportional to the load. If you double the load, the deflection and stress double.
  • Material properties are linear. The stress-strain curve is a straight line with the stress remaining proportional to the strain. There is no yielding of the material.
  • The loading is static and it is applied slowly. Dynamic loading effects, such as a sudden load application or impact, are not considered.
  • Temperature has no affect on the part geometry or material properties.
  • The deformation of the part is small compared to the dimensions of the part. Large deflection requires a nonlinear analysis to account for changing part and load geometry, and it is not considered during linear analysis.
  • Buckling is not a concern.

If you have a problem where these assumptions are not valid, you can either upgrade to the full analysis software package or pass the problem on to an analyst who is equipped to deal with it.

===============================================================

 

 

[Edit: Please let us know if you have additional questions or comments.]

 

Best regards, -Hugh



Hugh Henderson
Simulation QA Engineer
DLS
New Member
hoobas007
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎05-03-2012
Message 3 of 3 (1,019 Views)

Re: Autodesk Inventor Simulation True Stress - Strain Curve

05-03-2012 03:36 PM in reply to: henderh

Ok, thanks for the answer :smileywink:

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