Drafting Techniques

Drafting Techniques

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Active Contributor
JLeeSaxon
Posts: 37
Registered: ‎01-23-2012
Message 1 of 4 (471 Views)

Dimensioning with curves and fillets

471 Views, 3 Replies
10-18-2012 11:00 AM

This is a drafting, not AutoCAD-specific, question. Hope that's allowed.

 

All of my technical drawing books deal with dimensioning cylinders and rectangular prisms and leave anyone who needs to use an arc or fillet a non-right angle out in the cold.

 

I've attached an example of a part I'm not sure how to dimension.

The figure on the left, without fillets, is simple.

The figure on the right, with fillets added, becomes a MESS. Obviously, the way I've dimensioned it in this sketch is wrong. What's the right way?

Lee Saxon
Ellis Photographic Design
Distinguished Mentor
steven-g
Posts: 637
Registered: ‎05-11-2009
Message 2 of 4 (453 Views)

Re: Dimensioning with curves and fillets

10-18-2012 01:11 PM in reply to: JLeeSaxon

The right way is to convey all the neccesary dims to whoever needs them, and this often varies between industries. This is one way.

 

 

 

Regards Steven Gray
Setting Out (Joinery Manufacturing)
Autocad 2013LT
Windows 7 professional
Active Contributor
JLeeSaxon
Posts: 37
Registered: ‎01-23-2012
Message 3 of 4 (413 Views)

Re: Dimensioning with curves and fillets

10-19-2012 10:21 AM in reply to: steven-g

Thanks. That's a lot cleaner that my first version. It still includes some rounded dimensions, though, which makes me nervous.

 

How about what I've attached to this post? Does this work?

Lee Saxon
Ellis Photographic Design
Distinguished Mentor
steven-g
Posts: 637
Registered: ‎05-11-2009
Message 4 of 4 (390 Views)

Re: Dimensioning with curves and fillets

10-21-2012 10:39 AM in reply to: JLeeSaxon

Rounding is again dependent on industry, I work for a shopfitting company Autocad works to 7 decimal places We do our drawings to the nearest half millimeter and then the joiners use a measuring tape that quite often varies by up to 3 or 4 millimeters per meter than another joiner. But engineering work to much tighter tolerances. I think it gives a much clearer impression with the measurements in your latest drawing but it goes outside normal standards, I would either include 2 drawings 1 without the fillets as you show and a second with the fillets detailed, or with a single drawing but extend your lines with a dotted line beyond the fillets to the corners. However you decide to show the information most often comes down to your industry and it is not worth trying to change how information is usually standardized as all your co-workers expect information in a certain way.

Regards Steven Gray
Setting Out (Joinery Manufacturing)
Autocad 2013LT
Windows 7 professional
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