CAD Managers

CAD Managers

Reply
*Ric Hammond
Message 21 of 40 (64 Views)

Re: the Most important duties of a CAD Manager

02-16-2006 10:59 AM in reply to: *Kevin Anderson

WORD!


style="PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">


Your point is valid too, but I think the single
universal everyone needs is the people skills
first and foremost in order to get anything accomplished either from those
below or those above.

 

Simply put, technical skills are not
sufficient for any position in our firm. 

size=4>We are willing to pay for training to get you the skills you need to
get to the level we need, but if you have the personality of a doorknob, go
look somewhere else.

 

IMO people skills is the one category all
training schools neglect.


--
*<] :-) }

 

CAD Systems Manager
Autodesk Architectural
Desktop Certified Expert

 

The size of a company also
matters.  A better question is what are the most
important duties of
a CAD manager in a xxx person firm?

10 Person
25 Person
50
Person
100+ Person

All of the duties in the previous posts are
valid.  I think the proportion
of skills and duties need will vary
with company size and culture.


"Bob Mee" <bobmeeAtyahoo.com>
wrote in message

href="news:5088399@discussion.autodesk.com">
size=4>news:5088399@discussion.autodesk.com

size=4>...
Is it hard to comprehend that company's do things
differently?

Don't answer that.

<sigh>



"cad
user"  wrote in message
The IT department should handle the hardware
and software budget.  The
office manager/branch manager should work
with the IT staff about possible
growth.  Why would you give a person
the title CAD manager if that person
was managing the entire office? 
Makes no sense.
Distinguished Contributor
madcadd
Posts: 2,768
Registered: ‎01-05-2004
Message 22 of 40 (64 Views)

Re: the Most important duties of a CAD Manager

02-16-2006 11:01 AM in reply to: *Kevin Anderson
Never walk point

Never carry the radio

OK sure, I did both of these one night, but never had to again. They got the point. ....circa 1968
*Kevin Anderson
Message 23 of 40 (64 Views)

Re: the Most important duties of a CAD Manager

02-16-2006 11:04 AM in reply to: *Kevin Anderson

Well said! In a  mid to small operation it
seems that a CM is the go to guy for all things computer, which is simply too
broad a scope.

Distinguished Contributor
AlmightySR
Posts: 365
Registered: ‎12-12-2003
Message 24 of 40 (64 Views)

Re: the Most important duties of a CAD Manager

02-16-2006 11:23 AM in reply to: *Kevin Anderson
1. tolerence
2. resourcefulness
3. temperment



"Kevin Anderson" wrote in message
news:5088147@discussion.autodesk.com...
With all the recent great insightful discussions of Cad testing, Management
worth, Document management, etc... What do you think are the most important
traits / objectives of a good Cad manager? And how would you rank those
items in terms of order?
Like:
1. Knowledge of the particular Cad Program itself, (ADT, etc.)
2. Networking / Server knowledge
3. People skills for training, etc...
TIA,
--
Kevin Anderson
www.KAddAssociates.com
*Bob Mee
Message 25 of 40 (64 Views)

Re: the Most important duties of a CAD Manager

02-16-2006 11:56 AM in reply to: *Kevin Anderson
So why are you here then?

wrote in message news:5088633@discussion.autodesk.com...
1. tolerence
2. resourcefulness
3. temperment



"Kevin Anderson" wrote in message
news:5088147@discussion.autodesk.com...
With all the recent great insightful discussions of Cad testing, Management
worth, Document management, etc... What do you think are the most important
traits / objectives of a good Cad manager? And how would you rank those
items in terms of order?
Like:
1. Knowledge of the particular Cad Program itself, (ADT, etc.)
2. Networking / Server knowledge
3. People skills for training, etc...
TIA,
--
Kevin Anderson
www.KAddAssociates.com
*CADWiz
Message 26 of 40 (64 Views)

Re: the Most important duties of a CAD Manager

02-16-2006 11:58 AM in reply to: *Kevin Anderson
I total disagree with cad user as well. I don't know the first thing about
programming but still do a hell of job managing our CAD system (at least
that is what my clients tell me ;-). That said, I think programming is
important but I employ or if need be subcontract out specific needs. I
manage and direct that effort knowing exactly what my users need and it is
my job to understand what can and can not be done within the budget of my
department. I allow the programmers to do what they do best and I focus my
time on determining the needs and making sure they have an efficient running
system. Programmers have absolutely no idea how to stay on budget because
they are dreamers and almost never finish on time. At least the good
ones...

Cad User needs to get off his programming high horse. Most, I stress MOST,
programmers are horrible managers and even worse users of CAD. In my
experience, programming should not be used as a crutch to getting the job
done. The cost has to justify the need and MOST programmers think it is
always justified.


"cad user" wrote in message
news:5088365@discussion.autodesk.com...
The IT department should handle the hardware and software budget. The
office manager/branch manager should work with the IT staff about possible
growth. Why would you give a person the title CAD manager if that person
was managing the entire office? Makes no sense.

"melanie stone" wrote in message
news:5088358@discussion.autodesk.com...
and I totally disagree with you...
why would they need to budget? how much do you pay your users? how much are
subscription contracts? how much for pc upgrades, telecommunications needs?
how much do you need to allocate for paper, ink, and specialty equipment...
I didn't say *anything* about budgeting for construction.

I must from your knee-jerk misinterpretation of my mention of budgeting that
you've never actually worked in management?

"cad user" wrote in message
news:5088338@discussion.autodesk.com...
I totally disagree. Why would a CAD Manager need to schedule or budjet
anything? They are not Project Managers. They need to be able to
streamline the CAD system. They are the people that need to know most about
how the program works in order to make it do what the users want. Autocad
is suppose to be customized. Anybody can create standards, and standards
should be a team effort. The best way to enforce those standards is through
customization/automation so it makes it as easy as possible for users to put
objects on the correct layers, get blocks, details etc. as efficiently as
possible.

But I guess I'm wrong.
"melanie stone" wrote in message
news:5088315@discussion.autodesk.com...
I agree with david and hector that managerial and people skills are tops
here... then it will depend upon the actual office environment what comes
next. some might need to BE the IT guy, others might have a separate IT
department and not need to know precisely how everything works. Knowledge of
the programs? Honestly, I believe rudimentary knowledge about how common
tasks are accomplished is good enough for someone who is not drafting. Their
job is to manage... budget... schedule... etc, not to know every intricacy
of the program(s) being used.

"Kevin Anderson" wrote in message
news:5088147@discussion.autodesk.com...
With all the recent great insightful discussions of Cad testing, Management
worth, Document management, etc... What do you think are the most important
traits / objectives of a good Cad manager? And how would you rank those
items in terms of order?
Like:
1. Knowledge of the particular Cad Program itself, (ADT, etc.)
2. Networking / Server knowledge
3. People skills for training, etc...
TIA,
--
Kevin Anderson
www.KAddAssociates.com
*pkirill
Message 27 of 40 (64 Views)

Re: the Most important duties of a CAD Manager

02-16-2006 12:14 PM in reply to: *Kevin Anderson
Ah, I remember the days when life was nothing but absolutes and I knew them
all...


"cad user" wrote in message
news:5088365@discussion.autodesk.com...
The IT department should handle the hardware and software budget. The
office manager/branch manager should work with the IT staff about possible
growth. Why would you give a person the title CAD manager if that person
was managing the entire office? Makes no sense.

"melanie stone" wrote in message
news:5088358@discussion.autodesk.com...
and I totally disagree with you...
why would they need to budget? how much do you pay your users? how much are
subscription contracts? how much for pc upgrades, telecommunications needs?
how much do you need to allocate for paper, ink, and specialty equipment...
I didn't say *anything* about budgeting for construction.

I must from your knee-jerk misinterpretation of my mention of budgeting that
you've never actually worked in management?

"cad user" wrote in message
news:5088338@discussion.autodesk.com...
I totally disagree. Why would a CAD Manager need to schedule or budjet
anything? They are not Project Managers. They need to be able to
streamline the CAD system. They are the people that need to know most about
how the program works in order to make it do what the users want. Autocad
is suppose to be customized. Anybody can create standards, and standards
should be a team effort. The best way to enforce those standards is through
customization/automation so it makes it as easy as possible for users to put
objects on the correct layers, get blocks, details etc. as efficiently as
possible.

But I guess I'm wrong.
"melanie stone" wrote in message
news:5088315@discussion.autodesk.com...
I agree with david and hector that managerial and people skills are tops
here... then it will depend upon the actual office environment what comes
next. some might need to BE the IT guy, others might have a separate IT
department and not need to know precisely how everything works. Knowledge of
the programs? Honestly, I believe rudimentary knowledge about how common
tasks are accomplished is good enough for someone who is not drafting. Their
job is to manage... budget... schedule... etc, not to know every intricacy
of the program(s) being used.

"Kevin Anderson" wrote in message
news:5088147@discussion.autodesk.com...
With all the recent great insightful discussions of Cad testing, Management
worth, Document management, etc... What do you think are the most important
traits / objectives of a good Cad manager? And how would you rank those
items in terms of order?
Like:
1. Knowledge of the particular Cad Program itself, (ADT, etc.)
2. Networking / Server knowledge
3. People skills for training, etc...
TIA,
--
Kevin Anderson
www.KAddAssociates.com
*cad user
Message 28 of 40 (64 Views)

Re: the Most important duties of a CAD Manager

02-16-2006 12:14 PM in reply to: *Kevin Anderson
Programming Autocad is not a crutch, it is a tool that Autocad is designed
to use. If you feel it is a crutch, then I suggest you delete any custom
lisp, vba, etc. routines/programs/macros that your office uses and just use
Autocad right out of the box.

"CADWiz" wrote in message
news:5088716@discussion.autodesk.com...
I total disagree with cad user as well. I don't know the first thing about
programming but still do a hell of job managing our CAD system (at least
that is what my clients tell me ;-). That said, I think programming is
important but I employ or if need be subcontract out specific needs. I
manage and direct that effort knowing exactly what my users need and it is
my job to understand what can and can not be done within the budget of my
department. I allow the programmers to do what they do best and I focus my
time on determining the needs and making sure they have an efficient running
system. Programmers have absolutely no idea how to stay on budget because
they are dreamers and almost never finish on time. At least the good
ones...

Cad User needs to get off his programming high horse. Most, I stress MOST,
programmers are horrible managers and even worse users of CAD. In my
experience, programming should not be used as a crutch to getting the job
done. The cost has to justify the need and MOST programmers think it is
always justified.


"cad user" wrote in message
news:5088365@discussion.autodesk.com...
The IT department should handle the hardware and software budget. The
office manager/branch manager should work with the IT staff about possible
growth. Why would you give a person the title CAD manager if that person
was managing the entire office? Makes no sense.

"melanie stone" wrote in message
news:5088358@discussion.autodesk.com...
and I totally disagree with you...
why would they need to budget? how much do you pay your users? how much are
subscription contracts? how much for pc upgrades, telecommunications needs?
how much do you need to allocate for paper, ink, and specialty equipment...
I didn't say *anything* about budgeting for construction.

I must from your knee-jerk misinterpretation of my mention of budgeting that
you've never actually worked in management?

"cad user" wrote in message
news:5088338@discussion.autodesk.com...
I totally disagree. Why would a CAD Manager need to schedule or budjet
anything? They are not Project Managers. They need to be able to
streamline the CAD system. They are the people that need to know most about
how the program works in order to make it do what the users want. Autocad
is suppose to be customized. Anybody can create standards, and standards
should be a team effort. The best way to enforce those standards is through
customization/automation so it makes it as easy as possible for users to put
objects on the correct layers, get blocks, details etc. as efficiently as
possible.

But I guess I'm wrong.
"melanie stone" wrote in message
news:5088315@discussion.autodesk.com...
I agree with david and hector that managerial and people skills are tops
here... then it will depend upon the actual office environment what comes
next. some might need to BE the IT guy, others might have a separate IT
department and not need to know precisely how everything works. Knowledge of
the programs? Honestly, I believe rudimentary knowledge about how common
tasks are accomplished is good enough for someone who is not drafting. Their
job is to manage... budget... schedule... etc, not to know every intricacy
of the program(s) being used.

"Kevin Anderson" wrote in message
news:5088147@discussion.autodesk.com...
With all the recent great insightful discussions of Cad testing, Management
worth, Document management, etc... What do you think are the most important
traits / objectives of a good Cad manager? And how would you rank those
items in terms of order?
Like:
1. Knowledge of the particular Cad Program itself, (ADT, etc.)
2. Networking / Server knowledge
3. People skills for training, etc...
TIA,
--
Kevin Anderson
www.KAddAssociates.com
*CADWiz
Message 29 of 40 (64 Views)

Re: the Most important duties of a CAD Manager

02-16-2006 12:27 PM in reply to: *Kevin Anderson
That is not what I was saying. CAD obviously needs programming but if you
constantly need new programs to be efficient and you can't function with out
it, it's a crutch. Most commonly used programs can be found in on the web
and others need to be created. No office I know of uses CAD out of the box
but no office I know of needs to have someone on a constant basis adding
custom programs either. A programmer thinks you always need it and a CAD
manager decides whether or not the cost is worth it. Some managers can be
both but not many are good at it.



"cad user" wrote in message
news:5088738@discussion.autodesk.com...
Programming Autocad is not a crutch, it is a tool that Autocad is designed
to use. If you feel it is a crutch, then I suggest you delete any custom
lisp, vba, etc. routines/programs/macros that your office uses and just use
Autocad right out of the box.

"CADWiz" wrote in message
news:5088716@discussion.autodesk.com...
I total disagree with cad user as well. I don't know the first thing about
programming but still do a hell of job managing our CAD system (at least
that is what my clients tell me ;-). That said, I think programming is
important but I employ or if need be subcontract out specific needs. I
manage and direct that effort knowing exactly what my users need and it is
my job to understand what can and can not be done within the budget of my
department. I allow the programmers to do what they do best and I focus my
time on determining the needs and making sure they have an efficient running
system. Programmers have absolutely no idea how to stay on budget because
they are dreamers and almost never finish on time. At least the good
ones...

Cad User needs to get off his programming high horse. Most, I stress MOST,
programmers are horrible managers and even worse users of CAD. In my
experience, programming should not be used as a crutch to getting the job
done. The cost has to justify the need and MOST programmers think it is
always justified.


"cad user" wrote in message
news:5088365@discussion.autodesk.com...
The IT department should handle the hardware and software budget. The
office manager/branch manager should work with the IT staff about possible
growth. Why would you give a person the title CAD manager if that person
was managing the entire office? Makes no sense.

"melanie stone" wrote in message
news:5088358@discussion.autodesk.com...
and I totally disagree with you...
why would they need to budget? how much do you pay your users? how much are
subscription contracts? how much for pc upgrades, telecommunications needs?
how much do you need to allocate for paper, ink, and specialty equipment...
I didn't say *anything* about budgeting for construction.

I must from your knee-jerk misinterpretation of my mention of budgeting that
you've never actually worked in management?

"cad user" wrote in message
news:5088338@discussion.autodesk.com...
I totally disagree. Why would a CAD Manager need to schedule or budjet
anything? They are not Project Managers. They need to be able to
streamline the CAD system. They are the people that need to know most about
how the program works in order to make it do what the users want. Autocad
is suppose to be customized. Anybody can create standards, and standards
should be a team effort. The best way to enforce those standards is through
customization/automation so it makes it as easy as possible for users to put
objects on the correct layers, get blocks, details etc. as efficiently as
possible.

But I guess I'm wrong.
"melanie stone" wrote in message
news:5088315@discussion.autodesk.com...
I agree with david and hector that managerial and people skills are tops
here... then it will depend upon the actual office environment what comes
next. some might need to BE the IT guy, others might have a separate IT
department and not need to know precisely how everything works. Knowledge of
the programs? Honestly, I believe rudimentary knowledge about how common
tasks are accomplished is good enough for someone who is not drafting. Their
job is to manage... budget... schedule... etc, not to know every intricacy
of the program(s) being used.

"Kevin Anderson" wrote in message
news:5088147@discussion.autodesk.com...
With all the recent great insightful discussions of Cad testing, Management
worth, Document management, etc... What do you think are the most important
traits / objectives of a good Cad manager? And how would you rank those
items in terms of order?
Like:
1. Knowledge of the particular Cad Program itself, (ADT, etc.)
2. Networking / Server knowledge
3. People skills for training, etc...
TIA,
--
Kevin Anderson
www.KAddAssociates.com
*Matt Stachoni
Message 30 of 40 (64 Views)

Re: the Most important duties of a CAD Manager

02-16-2006 02:45 PM in reply to: *Kevin Anderson
On Thu, 16 Feb 2006 15:32:16 +0000, Kevin Anderson
wrote:

>With all the recent great insightful discussions of Cad testing, Management
>worth, Document management, etc... What do you think are the most important
>traits / objectives of a good Cad manager? And how would you rank those
>items in terms of order?
>Like:
>1. Knowledge of the particular Cad Program itself, (ADT, etc.)
>2. Networking / Server knowledge
>3. People skills for training, etc...
>TIA,

1. CAD application knowledge (obviously) - Users do not respect a CM who doesn't
understand how AutoCAD works at a deeper level than they do.
2. Time management
3. Patience with users, managers and other idiots
4. Ability to learn
5. Ability to UNLearn
6. Organizational skillz
7. Comfortableness in your superiority.

Matt
mstachoni@comcast.net
mstachoni@bhhtait.com
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