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*Atkinson, Jon
Message 1 of 9 (182 Views)

Minimum workstation requirements

182 Views, 8 Replies
11-22-2000 06:19 AM
To All,

All right I've no problem specifying my own home PC. But, when it comes
to determining what the minimum in the office should be, I'm a little
lost. My boss has just asked me to determine what a good minimum AutoCAD
station should be. We will be upgrading to ADT3 in the new year, and
might as well upgrade some of the old machines.

Right now I believe my machine is the fastest in the office, a screaming
P3-500 (or is that me screaming) with 128 Mb Ram and a whopping 4 Gb
hdd. And my video card, I'm surprised/disappointed to say has not gone
up in a puff of smoke, is a Diamond Stealth 3D 2000. Yes, I feel this is
a woefully under powered creature for the type of work expected of me,
and sometimes actually manage to do. But my question is, what is a
"Reasonable" CPU and video card for the "Average" user should be? I've
already noted that I need and deserve a better computer, like a dual 933
set-up with an Oxygen GVX210 with about a gig of ram and a terabyte of
hardrive space, but what do the other guys get?

Thanks for your suggestions, and remember "Reasonable" and "Average".

Jon Atkinson
*Schroeder, Erik
Message 2 of 9 (182 Views)

Re: Minimum workstation requirements

11-22-2000 06:27 AM in reply to: *Atkinson, Jon
P3-733 w/ 256mb RAM, video card w/ 32mb and the minimum HD most companies
are now offering is an 8 or 10 gb drive.

Jon Atkinson wrote:

> To All,
>
> All right I've no problem specifying my own home PC. But, when it comes
> to determining what the minimum in the office should be, I'm a little
> lost. My boss has just asked me to determine what a good minimum AutoCAD
> station should be. We will be upgrading to ADT3 in the new year, and
> might as well upgrade some of the old machines.
>
> Right now I believe my machine is the fastest in the office, a screaming
> P3-500 (or is that me screaming) with 128 Mb Ram and a whopping 4 Gb
> hdd. And my video card, I'm surprised/disappointed to say has not gone
> up in a puff of smoke, is a Diamond Stealth 3D 2000. Yes, I feel this is
> a woefully under powered creature for the type of work expected of me,
> and sometimes actually manage to do. But my question is, what is a
> "Reasonable" CPU and video card for the "Average" user should be? I've
> already noted that I need and deserve a better computer, like a dual 933
> set-up with an Oxygen GVX210 with about a gig of ram and a terabyte of
> hardrive space, but what do the other guys get?
>
> Thanks for your suggestions, and remember "Reasonable" and "Average".
>
> Jon Atkinson
*Atkinson, Jon
Message 3 of 9 (182 Views)

Re:

11-22-2000 06:50 AM in reply to: *Atkinson, Jon
Erik,

That works for me. It might seem a little excessive to my boss, since
that means he'll need to buy 40-45 new machines. Though I agree with the
CPU, RAM and hard drive, the video card might be the hardest thing to
push. Since most users don't do much 3D work, they may not need quite
that much power. I'll propose it and see how it flies.

Thanks,
Jon

Erik Schroeder wrote:
>
> P3-733 w/ 256mb RAM, video card w/ 32mb and the minimum HD most companies
> are now offering is an 8 or 10 gb drive.
>
> Jon Atkinson wrote:
>
> > To All,
> >
> > All right I've no problem specifying my own home PC. But, when it comes
> > to determining what the minimum in the office should be, I'm a little
> > lost. My boss has just asked me to determine what a good minimum AutoCAD
> > station should be. We will be upgrading to ADT3 in the new year, and
> > might as well upgrade some of the old machines.
> >
> > Right now I believe my machine is the fastest in the office, a screaming
> > P3-500 (or is that me screaming) with 128 Mb Ram and a whopping 4 Gb
> > hdd. And my video card, I'm surprised/disappointed to say has not gone
> > up in a puff of smoke, is a Diamond Stealth 3D 2000. Yes, I feel this is
> > a woefully under powered creature for the type of work expected of me,
> > and sometimes actually manage to do. But my question is, what is a
> > "Reasonable" CPU and video card for the "Average" user should be? I've
> > already noted that I need and deserve a better computer, like a dual 933
> > set-up with an Oxygen GVX210 with about a gig of ram and a terabyte of
> > hardrive space, but what do the other guys get?
> >
> > Thanks for your suggestions, and remember "Reasonable" and "Average".
> >
> > Jon Atkinson
*Schroeder, Erik
Message 4 of 9 (182 Views)

Re:

11-22-2000 07:26 AM in reply to: *Atkinson, Jon
Jon,
The ADT3 engine is graphics intensive software that creates a 3d model even if
you do not use 3d drawings. To get the most out of your machine I would
strongly suggest that you look at memory (RAM) and the video card as your first
priority for updating your systems. A P3-500 is fine for CPU speed, I thought
you were looking to update all your systems and currently the P3-733 is about
the minimum system you can find from Dell, Gateway, etc. which I would recommend
for CAD use.

Jon Atkinson wrote:

> Erik,
>
> That works for me. It might seem a little excessive to my boss, since
> that means he'll need to buy 40-45 new machines. Though I agree with the
> CPU, RAM and hard drive, the video card might be the hardest thing to
> push. Since most users don't do much 3D work, they may not need quite
> that much power. I'll propose it and see how it flies.
>
> Thanks,
> Jon
>
> Erik Schroeder wrote:
> >
> > P3-733 w/ 256mb RAM, video card w/ 32mb and the minimum HD most companies
> > are now offering is an 8 or 10 gb drive.
> >
> > Jon Atkinson wrote:
> >
> > > To All,
> > >
> > > All right I've no problem specifying my own home PC. But, when it comes
> > > to determining what the minimum in the office should be, I'm a little
> > > lost. My boss has just asked me to determine what a good minimum AutoCAD
> > > station should be. We will be upgrading to ADT3 in the new year, and
> > > might as well upgrade some of the old machines.
> > >
> > > Right now I believe my machine is the fastest in the office, a screaming
> > > P3-500 (or is that me screaming) with 128 Mb Ram and a whopping 4 Gb
> > > hdd. And my video card, I'm surprised/disappointed to say has not gone
> > > up in a puff of smoke, is a Diamond Stealth 3D 2000. Yes, I feel this is
> > > a woefully under powered creature for the type of work expected of me,
> > > and sometimes actually manage to do. But my question is, what is a
> > > "Reasonable" CPU and video card for the "Average" user should be? I've
> > > already noted that I need and deserve a better computer, like a dual 933
> > > set-up with an Oxygen GVX210 with about a gig of ram and a terabyte of
> > > hardrive space, but what do the other guys get?
> > >
> > > Thanks for your suggestions, and remember "Reasonable" and "Average".
> > >
> > > Jon Atkinson
*Stachoni, Matt
Message 5 of 9 (182 Views)

Re: Minimum workstation requirements

11-22-2000 08:08 AM in reply to: *Atkinson, Jon
John,

Luckily, the "minimum" machine available now (discounting really dumbed down
machines like Celerons) are able enough for most CAD duties, including ADT3.

The rough specs would be a P-III or Athlon 700 Mhz minimum processor; this is
generally considered real sweet spot for budgetary concerns. 256MB RAM, 10GB
7,200 RPM UDMA/66 hard disk. GeForce 2 based video card, 10/100Mbs NIC, PCI
sound card. For CAD users I say a 21" monitor is the absolute minimum. A good
one is about $1,000 nowadays, about half of what they cost 4 years ago, and well
worth every penny.

For more specifics, I would first forego any RDRAM-based system, as benchmarks
point to an unreasonably high price/performance ratio and Intel has YET to make
this thing really work well. Too much money for almost no discernable return.

I like GeForce 2-based graphice cards like the Elsa stuff because it works
really well and isn't finicky. I have a few 3D Labs Oxygen GVX12 cards and am
unipressed with their performance for what they cost. And their image quality
had a lot to be desired. If you were always working in high-polygon count 3D
models in 3DS VIZ, I would then recommend a high-end Wildcat card.

Also, Pentium 4-based machines aren't showing ANY real performance gains, and
are NOT dual-CPU capable yet, thus are off the radar screen and out of
contention. Sorry, Intel, you blew it here.

There are a couple of other "must haves" on my list for specifying equipment:

First, go with Windows 2000 for an operating system - Linux doesn't run AutoCAD
and Windows 98 is just plain insanity fuel. Windows NT is obsolete and a PIA.

Dual-CPU motherboard with 5PCI slots and 4 DIMM slots. Currently, this limits
you to either a dual Slot-1 BX chipset or a new, as-yet-untested-in-battle dual
FCPGA VIA chipset. I know of no one using a dual-FCPGA (socket 370) motherboard
in production units; they mostly sell to enthusiasts. Regardless, I wouldn't
dream of working on a modern system without 2 CPUs anymore. Unfortunately, it
also rules out AMD chips right now, but I understand they are working on a SMP
chiopset.

256MB SDRAM. Minimum. Forget 128MB, as Win2K really shines at 256MB+. If you are
doing ANY rendering, consider 512MB a minimum.

IBM 75GXP 15B+ 7,200 UDMA hard disk. I used to be a big SCSI fan, but the
performance inroads IDE has made (esp. with multiple devices) makes it a much
better value. No other IDE hard drive model is even worth mentioning.
Differences are just pennies, so go for the best.

Full tower case, which goes under the desk. Mid towers are okay, if you don't
mind them taking up the desk space (which in some cases is better than taking up
floor space). Regardless, get a 300W power supply and make sure it has removable
panels instead of a U-shaped wraparound design, whcih is a pain to deal with. A
removable motherboard tray and hard disk cage is also nice.

NEC internal ZIP drive. Cheap at $50-60, great for transferring files for home
use.

You probably want a CD-RW drive in the office somewhere to burn CDs for clients
and project archiving. I would get the Plextor 12/10/32A IDE drive. no one makes
better CD-RW/CD-R drives. For CD-ROM drives, they are a dime a dozen, but I
would opt for Toshiba or Sony 32x units, as they are quiet and run for a long
time.

Spend some money on quality keyboards and 3-button/scroll wheel mice. Sometimes
it's the tiny stuff that makes the most difference. I really like the MS
Intellimouse - very cheap and easy to use.

Spend the extra $$ and buy sound cards and speakers for users - they're cheap
enough. Go for a Sound Blaster Live Value, more or less because you really don't
have a choice anymore in a decent PC-based sound card. Too bad their Win2K
drivers suck big-time. Make sure the speakers have a headphone jack - some
cheapies do not. You probably don't need subwoofers :smileyhappy:

3COm 3C905C-TX NICs. They are "managed" NICs, which means that you can actually
use them to boot the PC and otherwise manage the machines. Since I've put in a
Windows 2000 infrastrructure, I can use 3C905C-equipped machines to boot via the
NIC and look for installable imagfes I have on my network. It makes rebuilding a
PC from scratch a 20 minute completely-hands-off affair.

As far as networking goes, make sure all CAD machines are tied together with a
dedicated 100MBps Switch (not a hub). This gives each user 100 Mbps bandwidth to
the fileserver. ADT3 is much slower across a network than R14 is (for some
reason), so every bit helps.

Monitors: Minimum for me would be the Mitsubishi 2040u 21" monitor - for the
proice (about $1100 shipped) it's unbeatable in quality. If you want to really
want to spend some money, go for the Sony 24" GDM-FW900. Make sure ANY monitor
you get has an integrated USB hub.

So, to recap what I would get for a "mainstream" ADT3 user:

Full tower case, 300W power supply
SuperMicro P6DBE motherboard: BX chipset, 4DIMM slots, 5 PCI, 2 ISA
512MB SDRAM
Dual P-III 800Mhz CPUs
IBM 75GXP 15GB hard disk
Toshiba or Sony 32x IDE CD-ROM drive
Elsa Gloria III AGP graphics card (64MB DDR RAM)
-or-
Creative Labs Annihilator 2 graphics card
3Com 3C905C-TX NIC
Sound Blaster Live Value
Speakers (w/integral headphone jack)
21" Mitsubishi 2040u monitor
MS keyboard
MS Intellimouse w/wheel

Matt
stachoni@bellatlantic.net
mstachoni@beyerdesign.com

On Wed, 22 Nov 2000 14:19:40 -0800, Jon Atkinson wrote:

>To All,
>
>All right I've no problem specifying my own home PC. But, when it comes
>to determining what the minimum in the office should be, I'm a little
>lost. My boss has just asked me to determine what a good minimum AutoCAD
>station should be. We will be upgrading to ADT3 in the new year, and
>might as well upgrade some of the old machines.
>
>Right now I believe my machine is the fastest in the office, a screaming
>P3-500 (or is that me screaming) with 128 Mb Ram and a whopping 4 Gb
>hdd. And my video card, I'm surprised/disappointed to say has not gone
>up in a puff of smoke, is a Diamond Stealth 3D 2000. Yes, I feel this is
>a woefully under powered creature for the type of work expected of me,
>and sometimes actually manage to do. But my question is, what is a
>"Reasonable" CPU and video card for the "Average" user should be? I've
>already noted that I need and deserve a better computer, like a dual 933
>set-up with an Oxygen GVX210 with about a gig of ram and a terabyte of
>hardrive space, but what do the other guys get?
>
>Thanks for your suggestions, and remember "Reasonable" and "Average".
>
>Jon Atkinson
*Stachoni, Matt
Message 6 of 9 (182 Views)

Re:

11-22-2000 09:34 AM in reply to: *Atkinson, Jon
Erik,

ADT3 only generates 3D graphics when you decide to view a drawing outside of a
PLAN type display configuration (e.g. MODEL). For a 2D plan view it's all still
2d as displayed, and brute force 3D power is unnecessary. If you never want to
deal with 3D models, you can use ADT3 easily with a 2D card like a Matrox G400,
which basically tanks on 3D. A P-III 500 is not only woefully underpowered for
the heavy-CPU use that ADT runs through to GET to that 2D display; it is also
essentially unavailable, since the slowest machine you can buy nowadays is a
733. No one sells a 500 Mhz machine because it's simply not economically
attractive.

Matt
stachoni@bellatlantic.net
mstachoni@beyerdesign.com

On Wed, 22 Nov 2000 15:26:24 -0800, Erik Schroeder
wrote:

>Jon,
>The ADT3 engine is graphics intensive software that creates a 3d model even if
>you do not use 3d drawings. To get the most out of your machine I would
>strongly suggest that you look at memory (RAM) and the video card as your first
>priority for updating your systems. A P3-500 is fine for CPU speed, I thought
>you were looking to update all your systems and currently the P3-733 is about
>the minimum system you can find from Dell, Gateway, etc. which I would recommend
>for CAD use.
*Schroeder, Erik
Message 7 of 9 (182 Views)

Re:

11-22-2000 12:54 PM in reply to: *Atkinson, Jon
Matt,
I am sorry if I mislead you in any way. I am aware of the 2D/3D relationship of
ADT3. However, I was trying to direct Jon into the future. The computers we
currently order all come standard with a 32MB video card which is capable of handling
3D graphics with no extra cost. Unfortunately Jon is looking to upgrade without
having to purchase new computers. Since this is the case he should concentrate his
efforts on Memory and video cards. A P3-400 with 128MB memory and a 4MB video card
is going to have trouble handling the system requirements of ADT3. Personally I
would order new computers as I feel this is the most cost effective means of
upgrading, especially with the free service contracts and upgrade offers currently
available.
Erik

Matt Stachoni wrote:

> Erik,
>
> ADT3 only generates 3D graphics when you decide to view a drawing outside of a
> PLAN type display configuration (e.g. MODEL). For a 2D plan view it's all still
> 2d as displayed, and brute force 3D power is unnecessary. If you never want to
> deal with 3D models, you can use ADT3 easily with a 2D card like a Matrox G400,
> which basically tanks on 3D. A P-III 500 is not only woefully underpowered for
> the heavy-CPU use that ADT runs through to GET to that 2D display; it is also
> essentially unavailable, since the slowest machine you can buy nowadays is a
> 733. No one sells a 500 Mhz machine because it's simply not economically
> attractive.
>
> Matt
> stachoni@bellatlantic.net
> mstachoni@beyerdesign.com
>
> On Wed, 22 Nov 2000 15:26:24 -0800, Erik Schroeder
> wrote:
>
> >Jon,
> >The ADT3 engine is graphics intensive software that creates a 3d model even if
> >you do not use 3d drawings. To get the most out of your machine I would
> >strongly suggest that you look at memory (RAM) and the video card as your first
> >priority for updating your systems. A P3-500 is fine for CPU speed, I thought
> >you were looking to update all your systems and currently the P3-733 is about
> >the minimum system you can find from Dell, Gateway, etc. which I would recommend
> >for CAD use.
*remg
Message 8 of 9 (182 Views)

Re: Minimum workstation requirements

11-22-2000 09:26 PM in reply to: *Atkinson, Jon
I agree it is easy to specify your own personal computer, but when it comes
to the company purchasing you usually run into a roadblock because of cost.
But if a company wants to stay competitive it should think longterm for its
use. Buying a system with the minimum is not the way to go unless you know
the machine is fully capable of expansion without purchasing a new box. It
might be helpful if you can put down on paper the cost savings over a
specific time period that will justify making a bigger purchase. Payback
time is not that long when you have a large workload. You need to look at
current manhours it takes to complete projects and the current capability of
the equipment. You are much better off to pay for it now than later.

"Jon Atkinson" wrote in message
news:3A1C467C.485A30B2@shealink.com...
> To All,
>
> All right I've no problem specifying my own home PC. But, when it comes
> to determining what the minimum in the office should be, I'm a little
> lost. My boss has just asked me to determine what a good minimum AutoCAD
> station should be. We will be upgrading to ADT3 in the new year, and
> might as well upgrade some of the old machines.
>
> Right now I believe my machine is the fastest in the office, a screaming
> P3-500 (or is that me screaming) with 128 Mb Ram and a whopping 4 Gb
> hdd. And my video card, I'm surprised/disappointed to say has not gone
> up in a puff of smoke, is a Diamond Stealth 3D 2000. Yes, I feel this is
> a woefully under powered creature for the type of work expected of me,
> and sometimes actually manage to do. But my question is, what is a
> "Reasonable" CPU and video card for the "Average" user should be? I've
> already noted that I need and deserve a better computer, like a dual 933
> set-up with an Oxygen GVX210 with about a gig of ram and a terabyte of
> hardrive space, but what do the other guys get?
>
> Thanks for your suggestions, and remember "Reasonable" and "Average".
>
> Jon Atkinson
>
*Atkinson, Jon
Message 9 of 9 (182 Views)

Re:

12-05-2000 02:54 AM in reply to: *Atkinson, Jon
Matt,

Sorry that I'm just getting back to the NG, it appears I missed some
interesting discussion. But you have described my home PC almost
exactly, with the exception of an AMD 900 MHz instead of dual Intel
800s. The problem is that only about 10, of the 40+ users, actually use
AutoCAD in a demanding way. This makes it tough to come up with an
office wide standard without spending a lot of money or causing petty
jealousies over who's got the better computer (not that many here are
computer literate enough to know what the differences are).

The other day I was talking to our Network Admin. about getting a new
hard drive for my machine, and why is it that most of the hard drives in
the office (including mine) were only 4Gb? The reply was simply
astonishing, "because you might actually use all that space." I was
stunned. There's more to it, but no less enlightening. She went on to
say that she was upset because all the hard drives that have been
arriving are 8-10Gbs, and 4Gbs were no longer available. Hmmm...

Anyway, I am making my recommendation according to all the replies.

CPU: 700+ (AMD or Intel)
Hard drive: 15+ Gb (ATA 100, 7200 rpm)
RAM: 256 Mb PC-133
Video: GeForce2 GTS DDR 32 Mb (due to the price/performance ratio)

Everything else is taken care of - all cases have 300W supplies,
Logitech Mouseman mice, cheap keyboards that work, CDs, floppies,
Nics... The only thing I wish we had more of were CD-RWs, I have one at
home and use it constantly. Some sound cards would be nice, but I think,
not likely.

Thank You all for your input,
Jon

Matt Stachoni wrote:
>
> John,
>
> Luckily, the "minimum" machine available now (discounting really dumbed down
> machines like Celerons) are able enough for most CAD duties, including ADT3.
>
> The rough specs would be a P-III or Athlon 700 Mhz minimum processor; this is
> generally considered real sweet spot for budgetary concerns. 256MB RAM, 10GB
> 7,200 RPM UDMA/66 hard disk. GeForce 2 based video card, 10/100Mbs NIC, PCI
> sound card. For CAD users I say a 21" monitor is the absolute minimum. A good
> one is about $1,000 nowadays, about half of what they cost 4 years ago, and well
> worth every penny.
>
> For more specifics, I would first forego any RDRAM-based system, as benchmarks
> point to an unreasonably high price/performance ratio and Intel has YET to make
> this thing really work well. Too much money for almost no discernable return.
>
> I like GeForce 2-based graphice cards like the Elsa stuff because it works
> really well and isn't finicky. I have a few 3D Labs Oxygen GVX12 cards and am
> unipressed with their performance for what they cost. And their image quality
> had a lot to be desired. If you were always working in high-polygon count 3D
> models in 3DS VIZ, I would then recommend a high-end Wildcat card.
>
> Also, Pentium 4-based machines aren't showing ANY real performance gains, and
> are NOT dual-CPU capable yet, thus are off the radar screen and out of
> contention. Sorry, Intel, you blew it here.
>
> There are a couple of other "must haves" on my list for specifying equipment:
>
> First, go with Windows 2000 for an operating system - Linux doesn't run AutoCAD
> and Windows 98 is just plain insanity fuel. Windows NT is obsolete and a PIA.
>
> Dual-CPU motherboard with 5PCI slots and 4 DIMM slots. Currently, this limits
> you to either a dual Slot-1 BX chipset or a new, as-yet-untested-in-battle dual
> FCPGA VIA chipset. I know of no one using a dual-FCPGA (socket 370) motherboard
> in production units; they mostly sell to enthusiasts. Regardless, I wouldn't
> dream of working on a modern system without 2 CPUs anymore. Unfortunately, it
> also rules out AMD chips right now, but I understand they are working on a SMP
> chiopset.
>
> 256MB SDRAM. Minimum. Forget 128MB, as Win2K really shines at 256MB+. If you are
> doing ANY rendering, consider 512MB a minimum.
>
> IBM 75GXP 15B+ 7,200 UDMA hard disk. I used to be a big SCSI fan, but the
> performance inroads IDE has made (esp. with multiple devices) makes it a much
> better value. No other IDE hard drive model is even worth mentioning.
> Differences are just pennies, so go for the best.
>
> Full tower case, which goes under the desk. Mid towers are okay, if you don't
> mind them taking up the desk space (which in some cases is better than taking up
> floor space). Regardless, get a 300W power supply and make sure it has removable
> panels instead of a U-shaped wraparound design, whcih is a pain to deal with. A
> removable motherboard tray and hard disk cage is also nice.
>
> NEC internal ZIP drive. Cheap at $50-60, great for transferring files for home
> use.
>
> You probably want a CD-RW drive in the office somewhere to burn CDs for clients
> and project archiving. I would get the Plextor 12/10/32A IDE drive. no one makes
> better CD-RW/CD-R drives. For CD-ROM drives, they are a dime a dozen, but I
> would opt for Toshiba or Sony 32x units, as they are quiet and run for a long
> time.
>
> Spend some money on quality keyboards and 3-button/scroll wheel mice. Sometimes
> it's the tiny stuff that makes the most difference. I really like the MS
> Intellimouse - very cheap and easy to use.
>
> Spend the extra $$ and buy sound cards and speakers for users - they're cheap
> enough. Go for a Sound Blaster Live Value, more or less because you really don't
> have a choice anymore in a decent PC-based sound card. Too bad their Win2K
> drivers suck big-time. Make sure the speakers have a headphone jack - some
> cheapies do not. You probably don't need subwoofers :smileyhappy:
>
> 3COm 3C905C-TX NICs. They are "managed" NICs, which means that you can actually
> use them to boot the PC and otherwise manage the machines. Since I've put in a
> Windows 2000 infrastrructure, I can use 3C905C-equipped machines to boot via the
> NIC and look for installable imagfes I have on my network. It makes rebuilding a
> PC from scratch a 20 minute completely-hands-off affair.
>
> As far as networking goes, make sure all CAD machines are tied together with a
> dedicated 100MBps Switch (not a hub). This gives each user 100 Mbps bandwidth to
> the fileserver. ADT3 is much slower across a network than R14 is (for some
> reason), so every bit helps.
>
> Monitors: Minimum for me would be the Mitsubishi 2040u 21" monitor - for the
> proice (about $1100 shipped) it's unbeatable in quality. If you want to really
> want to spend some money, go for the Sony 24" GDM-FW900. Make sure ANY monitor
> you get has an integrated USB hub.
>
> So, to recap what I would get for a "mainstream" ADT3 user:
>
> Full tower case, 300W power supply
> SuperMicro P6DBE motherboard: BX chipset, 4DIMM slots, 5 PCI, 2 ISA
> 512MB SDRAM
> Dual P-III 800Mhz CPUs
> IBM 75GXP 15GB hard disk
> Toshiba or Sony 32x IDE CD-ROM drive
> Elsa Gloria III AGP graphics card (64MB DDR RAM)
> -or-
> Creative Labs Annihilator 2 graphics card
> 3Com 3C905C-TX NIC
> Sound Blaster Live Value
> Speakers (w/integral headphone jack)
> 21" Mitsubishi 2040u monitor
> MS keyboard
> MS Intellimouse w/wheel
>
> Matt
> stachoni@bellatlantic.net
> mstachoni@beyerdesign.com
>
> On Wed, 22 Nov 2000 14:19:40 -0800, Jon Atkinson wrote:
>
> >To All,
> >
> >All right I've no problem specifying my own home PC. But, when it comes
> >to determining what the minimum in the office should be, I'm a little
> >lost. My boss has just asked me to determine what a good minimum AutoCAD
> >station should be. We will be upgrading to ADT3 in the new year, and
> >might as well upgrade some of the old machines.
> >
> >Right now I believe my machine is the fastest in the office, a screaming
> >P3-500 (or is that me screaming) with 128 Mb Ram and a whopping 4 Gb
> >hdd. And my video card, I'm surprised/disappointed to say has not gone
> >up in a puff of smoke, is a Diamond Stealth 3D 2000. Yes, I feel this is
> >a woefully under powered creature for the type of work expected of me,
> >and sometimes actually manage to do. But my question is, what is a
> >"Reasonable" CPU and video card for the "Average" user should be? I've
> >already noted that I need and deserve a better computer, like a dual 933
> >set-up with an Oxygen GVX210 with about a gig of ram and a terabyte of
> >hardrive space, but what do the other guys get?
> >
> >Thanks for your suggestions, and remember "Reasonable" and "Average".
> >
> >Jon Atkinson
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