AutoCAD Electrical General Discussion

AutoCAD Electrical General Discussion

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Distinguished Contributor
fdna49
Posts: 151
Registered: ‎12-11-2003
Message 1 of 10 (127 Views)

Component locations

127 Views, 9 Replies
03-31-2004 11:58 AM
Is there a way to specify the location of a component without having to manually specify it whenever it is inserted?
I have some components that are always on the subpanel, it is annoying to have to specify that location every time I insert the component.

Thanks
Chad
*Expert Elite*
testsubject
Posts: 1,096
Registered: ‎03-09-2004
Message 2 of 10 (127 Views)

Re: Component locations

04-01-2004 06:33 AM in reply to: fdna49
I am not sure about what you are asking for. If you just want to document that something was used in a panel but not show it, then Manual Insert/Insert Generic Marker from the Panel Toolbar and then place it somewhere outside the plotted area of your drawing. I use this to add things to the BOM that are not on the panel.
Bob Hanrahan
Ace User since 1998
Distinguished Contributor
fdna49
Posts: 151
Registered: ‎12-11-2003
Message 3 of 10 (127 Views)

Re: Component locations

04-01-2004 07:21 AM in reply to: fdna49
I want to use the locations so that when I run the report for components to insert on the panel I will only see the components that are on the panel, not the lights and pushbuttons that are on the door. On a tangent, how do you add something to the panel that isn't shown on the schematic, such as a ground bar?

Chad
*Jared Bunch \(Autodesk, Inc\)
Message 4 of 10 (127 Views)

Re: Component locations

04-01-2004 08:31 AM in reply to: fdna49
Chad If you are referring to filling in the LOC field data in the Insert/Edit Component dialog, yes, there is a way to have the location automatically entered. This is tied to the catalog selection and accomplished through the catalog database. In the catalog database there is a field called TEXTVALS. This field gives you the ability to specify attributes to populated and what information to populate them with upon selecting that particular catalog entry. For instance, you may have the following entry in the TEXTVALS field for a catalog selection: LOC=USER STATION;DESC1=E-STOP When the catalog entry is selected that has this information entered into the TEXTVALS field, AutoCAD Electrical will look for an attribute with the TAG, LOC, and an attribute with the TAG, DESC1. If found, it will populate those attributes with the information defined by the user, in our case, USER STATION and E-STOP. I hope this information helps!! -- Regards, Jared Bunch Technical Support Specialist Autodesk, Inc "fdna49" wrote in message news:1394344.1080832961233.JavaMail.jive@jiveforum1.autodesk.com... > I want to use the locations so that when I run the report for components to insert on the panel I will only see the components that are on the panel, not the lights and pushbuttons that are on the door. On a tangent, how do you add something to the panel that isn't shown on the schematic, such as a ground bar? > > Chad
*Expert Elite*
testsubject
Posts: 1,096
Registered: ‎03-09-2004
Message 5 of 10 (127 Views)

Re: Component locations

04-01-2004 10:04 AM in reply to: fdna49
Chad,

I'm sorry. I just reread you original post after my first cup of coffee and now it makes sense. You have to open the block that you are inserting into the schematic. On this drawing you will see the part plus all the attributes. Find the one labeled LOC and edit the default value to whatever you want it to be. Now every time you insert it, it will have whatever you have entered as the new default.

To add something that isn't on the schematic requires that you make a block with the attributes and insert it using browse.
Bob Hanrahan
Ace User since 1998
Distinguished Contributor
MartinLee
Posts: 435
Registered: ‎01-14-2004
Message 6 of 10 (127 Views)

Re: Component locations

04-05-2004 05:43 AM in reply to: fdna49
Chad,

There is one way to account for devices not shown in a schematic. This would include plastic wireway, din rail, enclosure hardware, etc. Once your enclosure or backpanel symbol has been placed on the drawing, use multiple BOM to account for these devices, and you can include a ground bar. I have an "intelligent" schematic ground symbol for the ground bar, so it gets a tag name and the catalog information.

Martin
*Expert Elite*
testsubject
Posts: 1,096
Registered: ‎03-09-2004
Message 7 of 10 (127 Views)

Re: Component locations

04-05-2004 06:44 AM in reply to: fdna49
Where is the multiple BOM located? I could not find it on the pull down. I'm using Rel 16.1.
Or are you referring to doing a BOM across multiple drawings?
If I have something that isn't on any of the drawings I just use a Generic Marker and place it outside the print window...
Bob Hanrahan
Ace User since 1998
Distinguished Contributor
MartinLee
Posts: 435
Registered: ‎01-14-2004
Message 8 of 10 (127 Views)

Re: Component locations

04-07-2004 09:15 AM in reply to: fdna49
It's in the Insert/Edit dialog box in the lower left corner, either for schematic or footprint.
*Expert Elite*
testsubject
Posts: 1,096
Registered: ‎03-09-2004
Message 9 of 10 (127 Views)

Re: Component locations

04-07-2004 09:27 AM in reply to: fdna49
Learn something new everyday. I have been using this software for over 7 years now and I never used it. If there is a part that is ordered with another part that is located on the schematic, I used Assembly codes from within the catalog to define them. For example, the motor controllers I use need a HP resistor installed to work. So I have the motor controller entered in multiple times in the catalog with different Assembly codes that match up with the HP resistor being used. Then I make each HP Resistor a sub assembly of that.

This way I do not have to remember to fill this out each time. I just select the appropriate Motor controller assembly and the HP resistor follows.

Thanks for the info,
Robert Hanrahan
Bob Hanrahan
Ace User since 1998
Distinguished Contributor
MartinLee
Posts: 435
Registered: ‎01-14-2004
Message 10 of 10 (127 Views)

Re: Component locations

04-11-2004 06:04 AM in reply to: fdna49
Robert,

We use a lot of assembly codes, too. These include fuses and fuse blocks, starters and thermal overload units, etd. But there are many places where the multiple BOM is useful because of the variety of combinations with devices and their relationship with other devices. We use it extensively for enclosure and backpanel devices (door stop kits, clamps, etc.) that don't normally show up in the schematic. The Multiple BOM capabililty is something that was added three or four years ago.

I apologize for the delay in responses, as I attended the "Gunslinger" event last week and then was out of the office for a couple of days.

Martin
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