AutoCAD Civil 3D Wishes

AutoCAD Civil 3D Wishes

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mikepo
Posts: 257
Registered: ‎04-29-2008
Message 1 of 10 (762 Views)
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generic subassemblies

762 Views, 9 Replies
09-14-2012 05:01 PM

Why can't Autodesk make the generic link subassemblies work all the same? I spent half a day trying to figure out LinkOffsetAndSlope subassembly only to find out the offset value is base on the assembly centerline and not the subassembly insertion point. What the??? The other link offsets work from the insertion point like they should.

Cmon Autodesk!!

Mike Porter
www.ppeng.com
Civil3D 2014 SP2
Win 7 Professional - 64-bit
HP Z230
Xeon 3.20Ghz
24GB of RAM
Nvidia GeForce GTX 760

Hi Mike,

 

I think you are missing the point. Autodesk supplies subassemblies that use Offset and others that use Width. There are probably infinite design conditions out there. Having both types of SubAssy helps you solve more conditions.

 

For the condition you describe, you should use LinkWidthandSlope. That will let you specify an offset from your EOP.

 

As the previous poster explained, if it says "Offset" in the subassembly name, it means offset from the corridor baseline. There are many design conditions that this function serves.

 

You mention LinkSlopeAndVerticalDeflection references the subassy insertion point. That is expected behavior. You don't see the word Offset in the title.

 

Best regards,

 

Tim

*Expert Elite*
sboon
Posts: 2,225
Registered: ‎11-08-2005
Message 2 of 10 (753 Views)

Re: generic subassemblies

09-15-2012 09:52 PM in reply to: mikepo

Autodesk uses offset to describe a distance from centerline, and width for a distance from the attachment point.  As far as I know they have always done this in every sub that they created. Perhaps your designs are all based on fixed widths, but I certainly appreciate having both types of subassembly.

Mentor
mikepo
Posts: 257
Registered: ‎04-29-2008
Message 3 of 10 (743 Views)

Re: generic subassemblies

09-17-2012 08:27 AM in reply to: sboon

I understand now how it works, but IMHO they're not consistent.

The "LinkSlopAndVerticalDeflection is based on the insertion point of the sub, not the center of a baseline.

Also the help "picture" for "LinkOffsetAndSlope" implies the same thing.

It doesn't even show the center of the assembly or baseline that it is tied to. It seems confusing to me that if I want a (x)' offset from my EOP for a simple shoulder, I also need to know how wide the lane is to get that offset. What if my lane is targeted to something so that it varies in width. Then my offset width would vary because it's tied to the center line and not to the EOP.

Maybe it's just me.

Mike Porter
www.ppeng.com
Civil3D 2014 SP2
Win 7 Professional - 64-bit
HP Z230
Xeon 3.20Ghz
24GB of RAM
Nvidia GeForce GTX 760
*Expert Elite*
tcorey
Posts: 2,765
Registered: ‎12-18-2002
Message 4 of 10 (721 Views)

Re: generic subassemblies

09-20-2012 04:46 PM in reply to: mikepo

Hi Mike,

 

I think you are missing the point. Autodesk supplies subassemblies that use Offset and others that use Width. There are probably infinite design conditions out there. Having both types of SubAssy helps you solve more conditions.

 

For the condition you describe, you should use LinkWidthandSlope. That will let you specify an offset from your EOP.

 

As the previous poster explained, if it says "Offset" in the subassembly name, it means offset from the corridor baseline. There are many design conditions that this function serves.

 

You mention LinkSlopeAndVerticalDeflection references the subassy insertion point. That is expected behavior. You don't see the word Offset in the title.

 

Best regards,

 

Tim

Tim Corey, Owner
Delta Engineering Systems
Redding, CA
Autodesk Authorized Value-Added Reseller
Mentor
mikepo
Posts: 257
Registered: ‎04-29-2008
Message 5 of 10 (706 Views)

Re: generic subassemblies

09-25-2012 08:30 AM in reply to: tcorey

Ok, I stand corrected. :smileyembarrassed:

LinkWidthAndSlope did what I wanted.

Thanks for the help,

Mike Porter
www.ppeng.com
Civil3D 2014 SP2
Win 7 Professional - 64-bit
HP Z230
Xeon 3.20Ghz
24GB of RAM
Nvidia GeForce GTX 760
*Expert Elite*
troma
Posts: 2,525
Registered: ‎05-21-2008
Message 6 of 10 (600 Views)

Re: generic subassemblies

01-22-2013 10:02 AM in reply to: mikepo

Bumping this thread because it frustrates me too.  I understand the answer, and yes, it works.  But here is my bug bear:

When I'm putting an assembly together, and I add a LinkOffsetAndSlope, I know that I'm dealing with an offset from the baseline.  Say I accept the default 10m.  It doesn't look like 10m from baseline.  It doesn't measure 10m from baseline; no it measures 10m from the insertion point.  So if I have a 3m lane and a 0.5m curb, the link is drawn at 10m from there, i.e. 13.5m from the baseline.  However the corridor will build it as being 10m from baseline, i.e. 6.5m from the insertion point.  That is the unacceptable inconcistancy.  If it is going to be 10m from baseline, draw it so.


Credit where credit is due! Give kudos or accept as solution whenever you can.

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tcorey
Posts: 2,765
Registered: ‎12-18-2002
Message 7 of 10 (591 Views)

Re: generic subassemblies

01-22-2013 10:41 AM in reply to: troma

What you see when you're creating an assembly is considered Layout Mode. The subassembly uses the Offset to Baseline as a width because it doesn't yet know where it's baseline is (even though it should know the baseline because the Assembly marker is there and wouldn't it cue on that?.) Once you create the corridor the offset will respect the baseline.

 

If the subassy offset is going to be controlled by a widening, you can somewhat work around the layout mode width by changing it to any number that makes your assembly look more realistic to you. When you run it, you're going to attach widenings, so the value you use here doesn't matter.

Tim Corey, Owner
Delta Engineering Systems
Redding, CA
Autodesk Authorized Value-Added Reseller
*Expert Elite*
troma
Posts: 2,525
Registered: ‎05-21-2008
Message 8 of 10 (588 Views)

Re: generic subassemblies

01-22-2013 10:53 AM in reply to: tcorey

tcorey wrote:

...

it should know the baseline because the Assembly marker is there and wouldn't it cue on that?

...


That's the point, Tim.

 

I just noticed another inconsistancy between the Offset and Width variety.  Working on the left of the assembly (a negative offset or width) the slope is opposite.  To go up at 2% with the Offset, you type 2%, but to go up at 2% with the Width, you need to type -2%.  How do I know that's for real and not just a layout mode thing to confuse me again?  Maybe it actually will go down at 2%, but it just looks like up in layout mode?


Credit where credit is due! Give kudos or accept as solution whenever you can.

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tcorey
Posts: 2,765
Registered: ‎12-18-2002
Message 9 of 10 (583 Views)

Re: generic subassemblies

01-22-2013 11:24 AM in reply to: troma

That's because LinkOffsetAndSlope does not include a Side parameter. It uses a negative offset to determine the side. The LinkWidthAndSlope subassy does have a Side parameter so you don't need to use a negative width to go left.

 

Tim

 

Tim Corey, Owner
Delta Engineering Systems
Redding, CA
Autodesk Authorized Value-Added Reseller
*Expert Elite*
troma
Posts: 2,525
Registered: ‎05-21-2008
Message 10 of 10 (576 Views)

Re: generic subassemblies

01-22-2013 02:18 PM in reply to: tcorey

Ok, good point.


Credit where credit is due! Give kudos or accept as solution whenever you can.

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