AutoCAD Civil 3D General Discussion

AutoCAD Civil 3D General Discussion

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Valued Contributor
CRThorn
Posts: 73
Registered: ‎09-04-2008
Message 1 of 18 (796 Views)

Speed humps

796 Views, 17 Replies
04-06-2010 06:12 AM
Hi,

Does anyone have a smart way of designing in Speed humps to a residential road with kerbs?

I have a few ideas all of which a a pain:

1. create a new sub-assembly which has the road level raised to the max level of the hump. Then use the custom frequency to mark the bottom of the ramp and it should work out the rest.

2. Create a 2nd profile on the longsection in the place of the speed hump then add an addtional corridor in each location over the top of the normal. I would then use the paste surface command to create the final contour plan.

As you can tell these are not very elegant. Any other ideas?

Chris
*Laurie
Message 2 of 18 (796 Views)

Re: Speed humps

04-06-2010 06:18 AM in reply to: CRThorn
Hi Chris,

What longitudinal shape do these "highly visible admissions of planning
failure" have?

Are they "ramp-flat-ramp", or "Watts profile" or some other?

One simple approach is to complete the design without them, then create
a grading object of the hump and paste it to the road design surface model.


Regards,


Laurie Comerford

CRThorn wrote:
> Hi,
>
> Does anyone have a smart way of designing in Speed humps to a residential road with kerbs?
>
> I have a few ideas all of which a a pain:
>
> 1. create a new sub-assembly which has the road level raised to the max level of the hump. Then use the custom frequency to mark the bottom of the ramp and it should work out the rest.
>
> 2. Create a 2nd profile on the longsection in the place of the speed hump then add an addtional corridor in each location over the top of the normal. I would then use the paste surface command to create the final contour plan.
>
> As you can tell these are not very elegant. Any other ideas?
>
> Chris
>
Valued Contributor
CRThorn
Posts: 73
Registered: ‎09-04-2008
Message 3 of 18 (796 Views)

Re: Speed humps

04-06-2010 06:24 AM in reply to: CRThorn
Its a Ramp flat ramp.

The grading idea is a good one I may try that. I dislike grading though and avoid them where ever possible!

Thanks
*Joe Bouza
Message 4 of 18 (796 Views)

Re: Speed humps

04-06-2010 07:16 AM in reply to: CRThorn
...What longitudinal shape do these "highly visible admissions of
planning
failure" have?...

That is hysterical Laurie

Joe
*John Mayo
Message 5 of 18 (796 Views)

Re: Speed humps

04-06-2010 08:30 AM in reply to: CRThorn
I wouldn't model this unless this high level of detail was needed in section
or profile.

The change in the contour is minimal. I would probably use an expression in
a surface label to raise the grade to height of the speed bump & just throw
some labels on the plan at the speed bump location.

If the design changes, you will need to edit the speed bumps. If you use
gradings & need to explode them (I believe this is still the recommend best
practice for stability), they will need to be rebuilt.

If you simply label the speed bumps & the design changes, the speed bumps
need no additional revision time.

--
John Mayo, PE

C3D 2010, RD 2010
Core i7 920 6GB DDR3
Radeon 4870HD 1 GB
Vista64
Valued Mentor
awood
Posts: 313
Registered: ‎06-24-2005
Message 6 of 18 (796 Views)

Re: Speed humps

04-06-2010 09:12 AM in reply to: CRThorn
Agreed Joe - LOL

Cheers,

AWood
Distinguished Contributor
apweng
Posts: 260
Registered: ‎12-10-2003
Message 7 of 18 (796 Views)

Re: Speed humps

04-06-2010 11:00 AM in reply to: CRThorn
Why model a speed bump when this is likely an engineering detail?

Over-modeling, in my opinion, is the source of many of the problems/challenges associated with "model based design technology" (not BIM by the they way, which I know is going to open a can of worms).

If you're needing to create a 3D model for visualization/analysis fair enough, but you really need to think about how your design information is going to be used. Many contractors construct from hard copy plan/profile drawings. Many also use design points that are uploaded to survey total station / GPS equipment for field surveyors. Machine controlled grading is sometimes used in larger projects.

I continuously run into designs where enormous amounts of effort have been put into trying to create the perfect model, when in actuality, most of that detailed information is never used. It may look pretty, but not very useful from a practical scenario.

Having said that every situation is different and it really helps to know what you're delivering as part of the design process, and how that information is going to be used.

Andrew
*John Mayo
Message 8 of 18 (796 Views)

Re: Speed humps

04-06-2010 11:32 AM in reply to: CRThorn
Excellent points Andrew.

An advantage of a dynamic model should also be the ability to revise it
fast.

--
John Mayo, PE

C3D 2010, RD 2010
Core i7 920 6GB DDR3
Radeon 4870HD 1 GB
Vista64
*John Mayo
Message 9 of 18 (796 Views)

Re: Speed humps

04-06-2010 11:33 AM in reply to: CRThorn
...and let me add I have learned this the hard way.

--
John Mayo, PE

C3D 2010, RD 2010
Core i7 920 6GB DDR3
Radeon 4870HD 1 GB
Vista64
*Laurie
Message 10 of 18 (796 Views)

Re: Speed humps

04-06-2010 03:51 PM in reply to: CRThorn
Hi,

For once I was not trying to hilarious. If you have a design where you
need speed humps to make it functional, then the design IS a result of
planning failure and the speed humps are the visible admittance of that
fact.

It amazes me here where I see roads that for various reasons have gone
out of shape and Authorities spend a fortune re-building them to make
them smooth and finally tack on speed humps to make them rough again.

Speed humps also ensure:

an increase in wear and tear on the vehicles using the road,
increases of noise levels as drivers accelerate back to operating speed
the occasional flying motor cycle
increased construction costs
increased driver resentment

If they must be used and there is enormous political pressure to use
them in many circumstances, then, although harder to build, the Watts
profile is by far the best shape to use.

Regards,


Laurie Comerford

AWood wrote:
> Agreed Joe - LOL
>
> Cheers,
>
> AWood
>
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