AutoCAD 2007/2008/2009

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*Octavio
Message 1 of 16 (12,883 Views)

AutoCAD vs ArchiCAD

12883 Views, 15 Replies
09-09-2008 08:25 AM
I an interested in knowing a few opinions about the main differences between
AutoCAD and ArchiCAD, possibly from those of you who have worked with both.
I know AutoCAD, so my question are to find out what ArchiCAD is about.

1. Once you have worked with AutoCAD, is ArchiCAD easy or hard to learn?



2. Which one is a better program?



2. Are there a lot of differences between the two programs?



3. ArchiCAD is widely used in the professions? It has any future and the
skills learned with ArchiCAD are marketable?



4. What regions of the Country use ArchiCAD more?






Thanks in advance.
*Dean Saadallah
Message 2 of 16 (12,883 Views)

Re: AutoCAD vs ArchiCAD

09-09-2008 08:45 AM in reply to: *Octavio
That's like comparing a BMW with a scooter: ArchiCAD is in the same "BIM"
class as REVIT, closest thing in the AutoCAD line of products in ACA-AutoCAD
Architecture2009 (no bim features) for which basic autocad knowledge is nice
but useless for full production:

http://forums.augi.com/showthread.php?t=86691
http://www.cgarchitect.com/vb/10448-archicad-vs-architectural-desktop.html?=
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vYHgviN-AcU&feature=related
http://www.scribd.com/doc/2231948/Revit-vs-Archicad-vs-Microstation

1. Pointless. Not the same at all.
2. Depends on your needs and time/money/clients to learn something totally
new.
3. Apple/MAC based users run it natively.
4. See #3.


REVIT by Autodesk:
http://usa.autodesk.com/adsk/servlet/index?id=3781831&siteID=123112
http://discussion.autodesk.com/index2.jspa?categoryID=27

--
Dean
LT/AutoCAD/ACA/Revit user
--
*Octavio
Message 3 of 16 (12,883 Views)

Re: AutoCAD vs ArchiCAD

09-09-2008 11:30 AM in reply to: *Octavio
Revit uses AutoCAD Architecture 2009?



"Dean Saadallah" wrote in message
news:6026888@discussion.autodesk.com...
> That's like comparing a BMW with a scooter: ArchiCAD is in the same "BIM"
> class as REVIT, closest thing in the AutoCAD line of products in
> ACA-AutoCAD Architecture2009 (no bim features) for which basic autocad
> knowledge is nice but useless for full production:
>
> http://forums.augi.com/showthread.php?t=86691
> http://www.cgarchitect.com/vb/10448-archicad-vs-architectural-desktop.html?=
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vYHgviN-AcU&feature=related
> http://www.scribd.com/doc/2231948/Revit-vs-Archicad-vs-Microstation
>
> 1. Pointless. Not the same at all.
> 2. Depends on your needs and time/money/clients to learn something totally
> new.
> 3. Apple/MAC based users run it natively.
> 4. See #3.
>
>
> REVIT by Autodesk:
> http://usa.autodesk.com/adsk/servlet/index?id=3781831&siteID=123112
> http://discussion.autodesk.com/index2.jspa?categoryID=27
>
> --
> Dean
> LT/AutoCAD/ACA/Revit user
> --
*Evan Larson
Message 4 of 16 (12,883 Views)

Re: AutoCAD vs ArchiCAD

09-09-2008 01:47 PM in reply to: *Octavio
No, it is a competely separate package. It can be purchased in a suite with
AutoCAD, and now with ACA in the new release if you need to keep AutoCAD
around but it is not needed to run the software. The reasons you may want
the suite with AutoCAD or ACA is to work with legacy files, or some detail
in AutoCAD because it is better/easier (in my opinion) that in Revit.
Either way you don't need it.

In a simplified way think of AutoCAD as lines, ACA as objects (walls, doors,
windows, etc.) and Revit as a model. Revit is AutoDesk's BIM solution for
architecture.

Depending on what you work on it would likely make the most sense to go to
Revit. It is completely different than working in an AutoCAD environment so
there is no gain starting there. Give it the 30 day trial and see what you
think.

Evan

"Octavio" wrote in message
news:6027009@discussion.autodesk.com...
Revit uses AutoCAD Architecture 2009?
*Dean Saadallah
Message 5 of 16 (12,883 Views)

Re: AutoCAD vs ArchiCAD

09-09-2008 02:06 PM in reply to: *Octavio
REVIT is one CAD product line by Autodesk.

AutoCAD is another CAD product line by Autodesk.

The first is built from the ground up for Architecture, the second product
line has a upgraded unique version customized for Architecture.
Other than the word ARCHITECTURE in both their names, they are separate
different CAD programs.

Plain AutoCAD is not worth the time/ effort of using as a replacement for
either.

Hope that explains it.

--
Dean
--
*Octavio
Message 6 of 16 (12,883 Views)

Re: AutoCAD vs ArchiCAD

09-09-2008 02:16 PM in reply to: *Octavio
Then, if I purchase Revit, I draw in "Revit" and not in AutoCAD
Architecture, is that correct?


Evan, you are implying below that Revit is not easy to work with. Do
people in architectural firms are of that opinion?



Do either AutoCAD Architecture or Revit have a future? If so, which one
will be more used by the architectural firms?



Is Revit used today by a lot of Architectural firms?






"Evan Larson" wrote in message
news:6027324@discussion.autodesk.com...
> No, it is a competely separate package. It can be purchased in a suite
> with AutoCAD, and now with ACA in the new release if you need to keep
> AutoCAD around but it is not needed to run the software. The reasons you
> may want the suite with AutoCAD or ACA is to work with legacy files, or
> some detail in AutoCAD because it is better/easier (in my opinion) that in
> Revit. Either way you don't need it.
>
> In a simplified way think of AutoCAD as lines, ACA as objects (walls,
> doors, windows, etc.) and Revit as a model. Revit is AutoDesk's BIM
> solution for architecture.
>
> Depending on what you work on it would likely make the most sense to go to
> Revit. It is completely different than working in an AutoCAD environment
> so there is no gain starting there. Give it the 30 day trial and see what
> you think.
>
> Evan
>
> "Octavio" wrote in message
> news:6027009@discussion.autodesk.com...
> Revit uses AutoCAD Architecture 2009?
*Evan Larson
Message 7 of 16 (12,883 Views)

Re: AutoCAD vs ArchiCAD

09-09-2008 02:45 PM in reply to: *Octavio
All loaded questions, go to the ACA and Revit forums and do a quick search
for much heated debates, I will give my 2 cents though, see below.



"Octavio" wrote in message
news:6027406@discussion.autodesk.com...

Then, if I purchase Revit, I draw in "Revit" and not in AutoCAD
Architecture, is that correct?

Yes, completely separate package. The interface and operation of Revit is
not tied at all to the way AutoCAD works. Some consider this good, others
bad. The short of it is if you already know AutoCAD then ACA is possibly a
good option, if you are starting from scratch give Revit a go. ACA adds
quasi BIM to AutoCAD where Revit is purpose built as a BIM solution. In
other words ACA is more or less an add on to AutoCAD that automates much of
what architects do. Revit on the other hand is built ground up as a model
based software purpose built for architecture. Draw the model and the
documents are produced for you so to speak. You need a section you cut the
section through the model and you have a section. The information is in the
model, not the section cut. You can kind of do this stuff in ACA but it is
hard and not worth the effort in most cases. If you want to do 3D work in
this way go with Revit, if you want to draw in more a 2D fashion then ACA is
the way to go. Nothing wrong with either, just how you want to work.


Evan, you are implying below that Revit is not easy to work with. Do
people in architectural firms are of that opinion?



No, what I am saying is detailing in Revit can be tougher but most would say
that you save so much time on the rest of the documents that it is a minor
issue. If you want to do your details in AutoCAD that is why they bundle
the software. Revit is a complex piece of software no matter what people
say though. You are designing and documenting your building in 3D all the
time. It purposly does not allow you to "fudge" much of anything and it
forces you to put the building together instead of drawing a bunch of lines
you may or may not know what they really mean. I would agrue that you need
pretty high functioning people to run Revit because you really need to know
how the building goes together. If you like to hire entry level drafters
and do a lot of redlines then Revit is not for you, stick with ACA so you
can "draw" the building instead of "model" the building.


Do either AutoCAD Architecture or Revit have a future? If so, which one
will be more used by the architectural firms?

Hotly debated topic. I am banking on Revit being the future which is why I
am migrating my firm from ACA to Revit. I have been using ACA since release
1 and moved our firm from AutoCAD to ACA (called ADT at the time) on release
2. It is pretty clear however that Revit is where AutoDesk is putting it's
money and efforts. A model based BIM solution is ultimately where the
industry is headed and if I were starting from scratch I would definitely
give Revit a good try.

Is Revit used today by a lot of Architectural firms?

Again, who really knows but they are increasing sales quickly. They give
Revit to students and make them pay for ACA so you can see that they are
actively working to increase the workforce that knows Revit. At our local
Tech college they are now as of this year teaching half ACA and half Revit.
Previously they worked only in ACA. One of our local Architecture schools
uses only Revit so again at least in our area Revit is the future. I will
say in our area there are a lot of Revit seats sitting on shelves but the
same can be said for ACA. More and more though I am seeing projects, often
large ones, produced in Revit so it is moving that way. It is a big
commitment so it is understandable it is a slow transition.



Evan
*Octavio
Message 8 of 16 (12,883 Views)

Re: AutoCAD vs ArchiCAD

09-10-2008 05:52 AM in reply to: *Octavio
Evan, your answers below are very good, thanks for educating me about these.
I am going to go now to the ACA and the Revit Newsgroups to ask there a few
questions, mainly about the best books for learning these (if you know
about these, hope that you will participate and answer these too there,
thanks). By the way, which area or country are you from? (you say below
"...at least in our area Revit is the future")

"Evan Larson" wrote in message
news:6027425@discussion.autodesk.com...
> All loaded questions, go to the ACA and Revit forums and do a quick search
> for much heated debates, I will give my 2 cents though, see below.
>
>
>
> "Octavio" wrote in message
> news:6027406@discussion.autodesk.com...
>
> Then, if I purchase Revit, I draw in "Revit" and not in AutoCAD
> Architecture, is that correct?
>
> Yes, completely separate package. The interface and operation of Revit is
> not tied at all to the way AutoCAD works. Some consider this good, others
> bad. The short of it is if you already know AutoCAD then ACA is possibly
> a good option, if you are starting from scratch give Revit a go. ACA adds
> quasi BIM to AutoCAD where Revit is purpose built as a BIM solution. In
> other words ACA is more or less an add on to AutoCAD that automates much
> of what architects do. Revit on the other hand is built ground up as a
> model based software purpose built for architecture. Draw the model and
> the documents are produced for you so to speak. You need a section you
> cut the section through the model and you have a section. The information
> is in the model, not the section cut. You can kind of do this stuff in
> ACA but it is hard and not worth the effort in most cases. If you want to
> do 3D work in this way go with Revit, if you want to draw in more a 2D
> fashion then ACA is the way to go. Nothing wrong with either, just how
> you want to work.
>
>
> Evan, you are implying below that Revit is not easy to work with. Do
> people in architectural firms are of that opinion?
>
>
>
> No, what I am saying is detailing in Revit can be tougher but most would
> say that you save so much time on the rest of the documents that it is a
> minor issue. If you want to do your details in AutoCAD that is why they
> bundle the software. Revit is a complex piece of software no matter what
> people say though. You are designing and documenting your building in 3D
> all the time. It purposly does not allow you to "fudge" much of anything
> and it forces you to put the building together instead of drawing a bunch
> of lines you may or may not know what they really mean. I would agrue
> that you need pretty high functioning people to run Revit because you
> really need to know how the building goes together. If you like to hire
> entry level drafters and do a lot of redlines then Revit is not for you,
> stick with ACA so you can "draw" the building instead of "model" the
> building.
>
>
> Do either AutoCAD Architecture or Revit have a future? If so, which one
> will be more used by the architectural firms?
>
> Hotly debated topic. I am banking on Revit being the future which is why
> I am migrating my firm from ACA to Revit. I have been using ACA since
> release 1 and moved our firm from AutoCAD to ACA (called ADT at the time)
> on release 2. It is pretty clear however that Revit is where AutoDesk is
> putting it's money and efforts. A model based BIM solution is ultimately
> where the industry is headed and if I were starting from scratch I would
> definitely give Revit a good try.
>
> Is Revit used today by a lot of Architectural firms?
>
> Again, who really knows but they are increasing sales quickly. They give
> Revit to students and make them pay for ACA so you can see that they are
> actively working to increase the workforce that knows Revit. At our local
> Tech college they are now as of this year teaching half ACA and half
> Revit. Previously they worked only in ACA. One of our local Architecture
> schools uses only Revit so again at least in our area Revit is the future.
> I will say in our area there are a lot of Revit seats sitting on shelves
> but the same can be said for ACA. More and more though I am seeing
> projects, often large ones, produced in Revit so it is moving that way.
> It is a big commitment so it is understandable it is a slow transition.
>
>
>
> Evan
*Evan Larson
Message 9 of 16 (12,883 Views)

Re: AutoCAD vs ArchiCAD

09-10-2008 07:13 AM in reply to: *Octavio
I am in Minnesota. From what I hear in the forums though dealers are
pushing Revit hard in all areas, and countries, and try not to sell you ACA.

Books I have for Revit are:

Mastering Revit Architecture 2009 by Paul F. Aubin
Revit Architecture 2009 A comprehensive guide by H. Edward Goldberg.

Paul and possibly Ed have books on ACA as well. I don't have a current one
for ACA but the one I used is the official Autodesk courseware. You can get
the courseware book for Revit as well from your dealer.

Evan

"Octavio" wrote in message
news:6027829@discussion.autodesk.com...
Evan, your answers below are very good, thanks for educating me about these.
I am going to go now to the ACA and the Revit Newsgroups to ask there a few
questions, mainly about the best books for learning these (if you know
about these, hope that you will participate and answer these too there,
thanks). By the way, which area or country are you from? (you say below
"...at least in our area Revit is the future")
*Octavio
Message 10 of 16 (12,883 Views)

Re: AutoCAD vs ArchiCAD

09-10-2008 07:55 AM in reply to: *Octavio
Thanks, Evan.

"Evan Larson" wrote in message
news:6027965@discussion.autodesk.com...
> I am in Minnesota. From what I hear in the forums though dealers are
> pushing Revit hard in all areas, and countries, and try not to sell you
> ACA.
>
> Books I have for Revit are:
>
> Mastering Revit Architecture 2009 by Paul F. Aubin
> Revit Architecture 2009 A comprehensive guide by H. Edward Goldberg.
>
> Paul and possibly Ed have books on ACA as well. I don't have a current
> one for ACA but the one I used is the official Autodesk courseware. You
> can get the courseware book for Revit as well from your dealer.
>
> Evan
>
> "Octavio" wrote in message
> news:6027829@discussion.autodesk.com...
> Evan, your answers below are very good, thanks for educating me about
> these.
> I am going to go now to the ACA and the Revit Newsgroups to ask there a
> few
> questions, mainly about the best books for learning these (if you know
> about these, hope that you will participate and answer these too there,
> thanks). By the way, which area or country are you from? (you say below
> "...at least in our area Revit is the future")
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