AutoCAD 2004/2005/2006

Reply
*Kirkham, Jon
Message 11 of 14 (238 Views)

Re: Why would AutoCAD use *.stb instead of *.ctb???

08-25-2003 04:41 AM in reply to: Aaron_Peech
If the drawing is set up for .stb, should it
say "monochrome.ctb (missing)"? shouldn't it be "... .stb
(missing)" at which point you simply drop the appropriate .stb into you
plot styles and the drawings will search it out?  Am I
wrong?
*Alexander, Dave
Message 12 of 14 (238 Views)

Re: Why would AutoCAD use *.stb instead of *.ctb???

08-25-2003 06:16 AM in reply to: Aaron_Peech
If you receive drawings from someone else, it is
only polite (productive may be) to alos include the ctb or stb file that the
drawing uses. Simply ask them for the appropiate stb and then copy it to the
same location as your ctb file.

Basically, a stb allows you to assign a plot style
to a layer without changing its color. The big advantage of stb is you can
assign a plot style to a layer and it will override the  any entity colors
on that layer. This works with xref layers but I haven't really tested it with
non xref layers.

 

Dave Alexander

 

 



style="PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">Why
would AutoCAD use *.stb instead of *.ctb???

OK, this is becoming an extremely huge time waster for me and some of my
fellow employees...

At our office, all of us use the pen assignment monochrome.ctb.

As far as I know, this is what AutoCAD defaults to, correct (I mean ctb
rather than stb)? I have full blown AutoCAD, and all of the people I work with
use LT 2004, and we all use the pen assignment monochrome.ctb.

Now, we have another office out of province, and some of them use
monochrome.ctb, but SOME use monochrome.stb...

Then when they email us drawings that we need to print out etc., it says
"monochrome.ctb (missing)", because they have their drawing set up for
monochrome.stb...

Then what 'I' have to do (everyone else doesn't seem to know autocad that
well, and asks me to do it for them), is I created a template that I insert
the drawing into, and can use all of my plot settings etc.

But this isn't as easy as it sounds.... when I have to print 60+
drawings... it can take an extremely long time to do. We've asked them to use
monochrome.ctb a few times, but they seem to think that AutoCAD defaults to
monochrome.stb or something... I can't really figure out why that could
possibly be though!

I guess what I want to know is, does AutoCAD default to STB in any
circumstance? Why would they be using *.stb at all? Is there any benefit to it
whatsoever?

*Saadallah, Dean
Message 13 of 14 (238 Views)

Re:

08-25-2003 06:19 AM in reply to: Aaron_Peech
This may help, from Knowledge Base:


Applying named plot styles (STB files)


----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----

Issue

What are named plot styles and how do you apply them to a drawing?

Solution

Plot styles are applied to a drawing to modify the hardcopy output.


Named plot styles (STB files) are unique, in that they can be applied to
either individual drawing objects, or by individual layer using the BYLAYER
setting. Named plot styles are different from color-dependent plot styles
(CTB files), in that they can be applied irrespective of color.


For example, you apply a named plot style that uses the dashed linetype to
two drawing objects: one red and one blue. In the plotted output (and the
full plot preview), the objects to which you applied the plot style both use
the dashed linetype.


To apply a named plot style, do one of the following:

If the drawing file already exists

1.. In the Plot dialog box, choose the Plot Device tab.
2.. Under Plot style table (pen assignments), select a plot style from the
Name list.
If there are no named plot styles (files with the extension .stb) in the
list, you need to convert your drawing to use named plot styles. Refer to
related solution TS35473 for further instructions.
3.. You are prompted to confirm whether you want to apply the plot style
to all layouts. Choose Yes to apply the style to all layouts, or No to apply
the style to the current layout only.
You have successfully applied a plot style.

If you have not yet created the drawing file

1.. From the Tools menu, choose Options to open the Options dialog box.
2.. On the Plotting tab, under Default plot style behavior for new
drawings, do the following:
a. Select the Use named plot styles option.
b. Select a plot style from the Default plot style table list.
c. Set the remaining values (or accept the defaults).
d. Choose OK to close the Options dialog box.
The settings you changed will be reflected in the new drawings you create;
they do not affect existing drawings. You can also apply named plot styles
to individual drawing objects or BYLAYER.

To apply a named plot style to a drawing object

1.. Select the objects to which you want to apply the plot style.
2.. From the Object Properties toolbar, select the plot style to apply
from the Plot Style Control list box.
The named plot style you selected is applied to the selected objects.

To apply a named plot style to a layer

1.. From the Format menu, choose Layer to display the Layer Properties
Manager.
2.. Choose Show details to display the layer details.
3.. Select the layer or layers to which you want to apply the plot style.
4.. Select the plot style you want to apply from the Plot style list.
5.. Choose OK to close the Layer Properties Manager.
The named plot style you selected is now applied to all objects on the
selected layers.


It is important to remember that the plot styles you apply display in the
full plot preview window and the hardcopy plot only. Properties applied
using plot styles do not display on-screen in the drawing window.

Related Topics:

a.. Adding user-defined lineweights to drawings for output
b.. Applying color dependent plot styles (CTB files)
c.. Assigning a plot style to the Model tab or a layout tab
d.. Assigning a style to objects in a named plot style table (STB file)
e.. Converting drawings using color dependent plot styles to use named
plot styles
f.. Plotting with the Hide option turned on in plots with named plot
styles
g.. Recovering named plot styles after converting a drawing to color
dependent mode
h.. Using Plot style tables




TS49117






--
Dean Saadallah
Add-on products for LT
http://www.pendean.com/lt
--
*Kolberg, Matt
Message 14 of 14 (238 Views)

Re:

08-26-2003 03:23 AM in reply to: Aaron_Peech
It takes some reading and experimenting with STB's
to really appreciate the value in them.  My company, like all other
companies, got used to colour dependant plotting before AutoCAD 2000.  I
thought "there must be a reason for these STB's"  So I looked into it and I
love them now.  I wouldn't go back because the STB's are much more
versatile than CTB's.  You can plot a million different ways with just one
STB file instead of a hundred CTB's.

 

In resposne to Dean's comment "...
face="Times New Roman" size=3>probably the only
way to do it in the next few
versions..." I've thought of this as well.  It seems, to me, a little
redundant and a bit confusing to have 2 different methods.  If I were a
betting man, which I'm not, I would bet that 1 or 2 versions away we'll see the
end of colour dependant plot styles.

 

Matt Kolberg


style="PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">

If you receive drawings from someone else, it is
only polite (productive may be) to alos include the ctb or stb file that the
drawing uses. Simply ask them for the appropiate stb and then copy it to the
same location as your ctb file.

Basically, a stb allows you to assign a plot
style to a layer without changing its color. The big advantage of stb is you
can assign a plot style to a layer and it will override the  any entity
colors on that layer. This works with xref layers but I haven't really tested
it with non xref layers.

 

Dave Alexander

 

 



style="PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">Why
would AutoCAD use *.stb instead of *.ctb???

OK, this is becoming an extremely huge time waster for me and some of my
fellow employees...

At our office, all of us use the pen assignment monochrome.ctb.

As far as I know, this is what AutoCAD defaults to, correct (I mean ctb
rather than stb)? I have full blown AutoCAD, and all of the people I work
with use LT 2004, and we all use the pen assignment monochrome.ctb.

Now, we have another office out of province, and some of them use
monochrome.ctb, but SOME use monochrome.stb...

Then when they email us drawings that we need to print out etc., it says
"monochrome.ctb (missing)", because they have their drawing set up for
monochrome.stb...

Then what 'I' have to do (everyone else doesn't seem to know autocad that
well, and asks me to do it for them), is I created a template that I insert
the drawing into, and can use all of my plot settings etc.

But this isn't as easy as it sounds.... when I have to print 60+
drawings... it can take an extremely long time to do. We've asked them to
use monochrome.ctb a few times, but they seem to think that AutoCAD defaults
to monochrome.stb or something... I can't really figure out why that could
possibly be though!

I guess what I want to know is, does AutoCAD default to STB in any
circumstance? Why would they be using *.stb at all? Is there any benefit to
it whatsoever?

Announcements
Are you familiar with the Autodesk Expert Elites? The Expert Elite program is made up of customers that help other customers by sharing knowledge and exemplifying an engaging style of collaboration. To learn more, please visit our Expert Elite website.
Need installation help?

Start with some of our most frequented solutions or visit the Installation and Licensing Forum to get help installing your software.