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KJFortin
Posts: 5
Registered: ‎02-26-2010
Message 1 of 21 (18,035 Views)

PDF floorplan, import as revit underlay?

18035 Views, 20 Replies
02-27-2010 07:02 PM
Can I import a florrplan in PDF format to begin a drawing?
Valued Mentor
vector2
Posts: 2,058
Registered: ‎03-28-2009
Message 2 of 21 (18,027 Views)

Re: PDF floorplan, import as revit underlay?

02-28-2010 04:48 AM in reply to: KJFortin
KJFortin-

smart thinking..

yes- a PDF floorplan is a very good way to start
a revit project.. but you must first convert the PDF
to a jpeg image.. you also need to know just one
dimension in that image- and create two points
in revit with that dimension in a floorplan view-
and then align the image to that dimension..
*cdv
Message 3 of 21 (18,026 Views)

Re: PDF floorplan, import as revit underlay?

02-28-2010 04:50 AM in reply to: KJFortin
Unfortunately you can not import pdf's into Revit. That has been on my wish
list for awhile. If you have the suite or access to Autocad 2010 you can
import into autocad, trace over what you need and then import the dwg file.

"KJFortin" wrote in message news:6345675@discussion.autodesk.com...
> Can I import a florrplan in PDF format to begin a drawing?
Valued Mentor
vector2
Posts: 2,058
Registered: ‎03-28-2009
Message 4 of 21 (18,026 Views)

Re: PDF floorplan, import as revit underlay?

02-28-2010 05:15 AM in reply to: KJFortin
KJFortin-

the worst thing you can do is import any DWG into revit..

and there is no need for that anyway..

if you don't have adobe acrobat to convert the PDF to an image-
just printscreen it..

or you can just LOOK at the PDF and draw the walls
according to what you see and then dimension them
the way you want..
*The Dark Princess
Message 5 of 21 (18,026 Views)

Re: PDF floorplan, import as revit underlay?

02-28-2010 06:12 AM in reply to: KJFortin
>the worst thing you can do is import any DWG into revit..

why?

scaling off a jpeg has 1/10000 the accuracy of a drawing.

--
TDP

First things first, but not necessarily in that order.

The Doctor
wrote in message news:6345777@discussion.autodesk.com...
KJFortin-

the worst thing you can do is import any DWG into revit..

and there is no need for that anyway..

if you don't have adobe acrobat to convert the PDF to an image-
just printscreen it..

or you can just LOOK at the PDF and draw the walls
according to what you see and then dimension them
the way you want..
*Terry W. Dotson
Message 6 of 21 (18,026 Views)

Re: PDF floorplan, import as revit underlay?

02-28-2010 08:39 AM in reply to: KJFortin
On 2/28/2010 7:50 AM, cdv wrote:

> Unfortunately you can not import pdf's into Revit.

You can if you convert them to DWGs first.

http://www.dotsoft.com/revit/pdf2revit.htm

Terry
*The Dark Princess
Message 7 of 21 (18,026 Views)

Re: PDF floorplan, import as revit underlay?

02-28-2010 09:07 AM in reply to: KJFortin
LOL!

--
TDP

First things first, but not necessarily in that order.

The Doctor
"Terry W. Dotson" wrote in message
news:6345825@discussion.autodesk.com...
On 2/28/2010 7:50 AM, cdv wrote:

> Unfortunately you can not import pdf's into Revit.

You can if you convert them to DWGs first.

http://www.dotsoft.com/revit/pdf2revit.htm

Terry
Valued Mentor
vector2
Posts: 2,058
Registered: ‎03-28-2009
Message 8 of 21 (18,026 Views)

Re: PDF floorplan, import as revit underlay?

02-28-2010 11:57 AM in reply to: KJFortin
TDP-

two good questions-

1. isn't tracing an image to build walls in revit inaccurate?
2. what is wrong with bringing DWGs into revit?

answer:

1. the way you start a revit project is to start by
building the walls.. the idea is to put the walls
in their approximate location and then place grid
lines somewhere near those walls and then align
and lock those grid lines to the walls- and then
dimension those grid lines with the walls locked
to those grids..

and this revolutionary procedure makes it possible
to start a project from a pencil sketch of a floorplan..
importing that sketch into revit as an image and tracing
over it just makes it a little more convenient than having
the printed sketch next to your monitor- but not all
that much.. because again- all you want to do is
place your walls in their approximate location to start..
there is no point in trying to place accurate lines into
revit for starting walls- because the accuracy of those
lines means nothing to revit..

2. DWG in revit?- don't do it.
trust me.. don't EVER import DWG's into your revit project files..
yes revit can import DWG files- but it is seriously bad practice..
it brings with them a myriad of layers/objects that get converted to
linetypes- and your materials- text styles- filled regions- etc. etc.-
gets ALL screwed up.. basically your revit file turns into a major
case of FUBAR..

you CAN- if you want to save a few minutes building a site
plan- LINK a DWG into a separate session of revit and use
it for a temporary underlay to create a toposurface and
"revitize" it and then LINK that revit site file to your building file..

i realize this does not satisfy the "feelings" of CAD people
who yearn to make AutoCAD part of revit- but it's the right way
to do it..
*The Dark Princess
Message 9 of 21 (18,026 Views)

Re: PDF floorplan, import as revit underlay?

02-28-2010 06:28 PM in reply to: KJFortin
it is easuly done and incredibly accurate - far more accurate than revit.
but this is beyond your knowledge and possibly beyond your comprehension. as
a person who envisioned bim before you were born i can say that with ease.
as a person who worked in bim in 1983 I can say that. if you want to see my
work google meyerson symphony center dallas. that was the start of bim for
me.

--
TDP

First things first, but not necessarily in that order.

The Doctor
wrote in message news:6345847@discussion.autodesk.com...
TDP-

two good questions-

1. isn't tracing an image to build walls in revit inaccurate?
2. what is wrong with bringing DWGs into revit?

answer:

1. the way you start a revit project is to start by
building the walls.. the idea is to put the walls
in their approximate location and then place grid
lines somewhere near those walls and then align
and lock those grid lines to the walls- and then
dimension those grid lines with the walls locked
to those grids..

and this revolutionary procedure makes it possible
to start a project from a pencil sketch of a floorplan..
importing that sketch into revit as an image and tracing
over it just makes it a little more convenient than having
the printed sketch next to your monitor- but not all
that much.. because again- all you want to do is
place your walls in their approximate location to start..
there is no point in trying to place accurate lines into
revit for starting walls- because the accuracy of those
lines means nothing to revit..

2. DWG in revit?- don't do it.
trust me.. don't EVER import DWG's into your revit project files..
yes revit can import DWG files- but it is seriously bad practice..
it brings with them a myriad of layers/objects that get converted to
linetypes- and your materials- text styles- filled regions- etc. etc.-
gets ALL screwed up.. basically your revit file turns into a major
case of FUBAR..

you CAN- if you want to save a few minutes building a site
plan- LINK a DWG into a separate session of revit and use
it for a temporary underlay to create a toposurface and
"revitize" it and then LINK that revit site file to your building file..

i realize this does not satisfy the "feelings" of CAD people
who yearn to make AutoCAD part of revit- but it's the right way
to do it..
Valued Mentor
vector2
Posts: 2,058
Registered: ‎03-28-2009
Message 10 of 21 (18,026 Views)

Re: PDF floorplan, import as revit underlay?

02-28-2010 06:37 PM in reply to: KJFortin
TDP-

let me put this into slightly different words for you
because this is one of the master keys to making
the transistion from AutoCAD to revit..



1. the way you start a revit project is to start by
building the walls.. the idea is to put the walls
in their approximate location and then place grid
lines somewhere near those walls and then align
and lock those grid lines to the walls- and then
dimension those grid lines with the walls locked
to those grids..

this means you can start a project from a pencil
sketch or any CAD sketch of a floorplan..

importing that sketch into revit as an image and tracing
over it just makes it a little more convenient than having
the printed sketch next to your monitor- but not all
that much.. because again- all you want to do is
place your walls in their approximate location to start
the project..

there is no point in trying to place accurate lines into
revit for starting walls- because the accuracy of those
lines means nothing to revit..

2. don't EVER import DWG's into your revit project..
yes revit can import DWG files- but it is seriously bad practice..
it brings with them a myriad of layers/objects that get converted to
linetypes- and your materials- text styles- filled regions- etc. etc.-
gets ALL screwed up.. basically your revit file turns into a major
case of FUBAR..

you CAN- if you want to save a few minutes building a site
plan- LINK a DWG into a separate session of revit and use
it for a temporary underlay to create a toposurface and
"revitize" it- and then LINK that revit site file to your building file..

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