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Valued Contributor
lstarbird
Posts: 55
Registered: ‎09-06-2007
Message 1 of 7 (380 Views)

Land Desktop DWGs to Revit?

380 Views, 6 Replies
05-26-2010 03:45 PM
We are a civil firm currently using Land Desktop 2007 & just recieved an email from an architect asking all the consultants to confirm if they're using Revit 2011 for compatability reasons. I'm not that familiar with Revit, but my understanding is that, as civils, we won't be using Revit, but instead, would typically provide the Revit users with a DWG for them to import. Is this correct? Or is there more to it?
*cdv
Message 2 of 7 (380 Views)

Re: Land Desktop DWGs to Revit?

05-26-2010 04:24 PM in reply to: lstarbird
Yes you are correct. I believe Autocad Civil 3d has replaced Land Desktop.

As long as you provide the architect with an autocad file with the contours
at their proper elevations and not flattened. They will be able to import
the file into Revit and will be able to create their topo in Revit .

"lstarbird" wrote in message news:6398060@discussion.autodesk.com...
> We are a civil firm currently using Land Desktop 2007 & just recieved an
> email from an architect asking all the consultants to confirm if they're
> using Revit 2011 for compatability reasons. I'm not that familiar with
> Revit, but my understanding is that, as civils, we won't be using Revit,
> but instead, would typically provide the Revit users with a DWG for them
> to import. Is this correct? Or is there more to it?
Valued Mentor
vector2
Posts: 2,058
Registered: ‎03-28-2009
Message 3 of 7 (380 Views)

Re: Land Desktop DWGs to Revit?

05-26-2010 04:56 PM in reply to: lstarbird
Istarbird-

you always want to link an AutoCAD
site plan into it's own revit project file
and then delete it after you finish using
it as reference- and then link the new revit
site plan to the revit project..
*Murph
Message 4 of 7 (380 Views)

Re: Land Desktop DWGs to Revit?

05-27-2010 04:58 AM in reply to: lstarbird
If all you are doing is the initial site layout then you may be ok. However
if you plan on working with them getting updates back and editing your
design then no you will be left out in the dark. There's more you can take
advantage of using a newer version of Civil 3D.

--

Murph
http://map3d.wordpress.com/


"lstarbird" wrote in message news:6398060@discussion.autodesk.com...
We are a civil firm currently using Land Desktop 2007 & just recieved an
email from an architect asking all the consultants to confirm if they're
using Revit 2011 for compatability reasons. I'm not that familiar with
Revit, but my understanding is that, as civils, we won't be using Revit, but
instead, would typically provide the Revit users with a DWG for them to
import. Is this correct? Or is there more to it?
Valued Contributor
lstarbird
Posts: 55
Registered: ‎09-06-2007
Message 5 of 7 (380 Views)

Re: Land Desktop DWGs to Revit?

05-27-2010 09:32 AM in reply to: lstarbird
As a civil engineering firm I'd like to know what Revit is used for by other disciplines, would civil engineering firm have any uses for the program? I'd like to know what other disciplines are using Revit, and what products are created with this program? Do civil engineering firms need to provide them any special 3D information to support any of there products? What products would our 3D (or 2D) be used to create those other disciplines products?
*Matt Dillon
Message 6 of 7 (380 Views)

Re: Land Desktop DWGs to Revit?

05-27-2010 02:19 PM in reply to: lstarbird
I can't see a compelling reason for a purely Civil Engineering or Surveying
firm to invest in Revit.

However, there are a few things you'll want to be aware of when sharing
files with Revit users. To obtain data from them, you can have them export a
building site from Revit as an ADSK file (available on the Revit Application
menu under "Export"). This can be imported directly into Civil3D.

When sending data to an architect or engineer using Revit, send it to them
without any custom Civil3D objects, as Revit doesn't have any object
enablers for them - contours should be comprised of geometry that is in 3D
at the elevations that they represent to enable them to be used in creating
a toposurface in Revit.

Also, and this is a biggie - be aware that Revit versions prior to 2011 have
a limit of 2 miles from the origin for all geometry. If you're using state
plane coordinates chances are your site plan is outside of that origin. It
can be dealt with on the architect's side, but if you can get them the
geometry so that it's closer to the origin in the first place it will make
things easier.

Revit 2011 has a limit of 20 miles.


"lstarbird" wrote in message news:6398696@discussion.autodesk.com...
> As a civil engineering firm I'd like to know what Revit is used for by
> other disciplines, would civil engineering firm have any uses for the
> program? I'd like to know what other disciplines are using Revit, and
> what products are created with this program? Do civil engineering firms
> need to provide them any special 3D information to support any of there
> products? What products would our 3D (or 2D) be used to create those
> other disciplines products?
*Murph
Message 7 of 7 (380 Views)

Re: Land Desktop DWGs to Revit?

05-27-2010 03:05 PM in reply to: lstarbird
"Matt Dillon" wrote in message
news:6398994@discussion.autodesk.com...
>I can't see a compelling reason for a purely Civil Engineering or Surveying
> firm to invest in Revit.

Well they can use it to design their new office buildings.

lstarbird,
I agree with Matt on this at one time the Revit Structure was being pushed
to build/design bridges with so unless you're into that the only thing you
will need to worry about is upgrading to import ADSK files, LDT doesn't
handle them also with the newer version of Civil 3D you have more access to
GIS data that is helpful in the design of civil projects.

--

Murph
http://map3d.wordpress.com/

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