Inventor General

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*Bogan, Bill
Message 11 of 13 (36 Views)

Re:

11-06-2002 12:46 PM in reply to: *Cross, Gary
Too  bad the electronic versions don't have
bookmarks and come on eBook CD's so you could carry them into the throne
room.  :smileyhappy:


--
Bill Bogan


style="PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">
Richard
You
are right on the mark. Books are soooo much eaiser to flip through while
hunting down a solution or explaination. They are transportable (nix the
laptop solution on a beach - sand, bright sun, water.....). Bookmarks remain
in place until you remove them.
Printing from the help is a sorry second to
a good book.

jp
*Hintehoeller, Richard
Message 12 of 13 (36 Views)

Re:

11-06-2002 10:12 PM in reply to: *Cross, Gary
There are several reasons why I prefer books.

1/ Your retention is better. Many years ago, before computers had the
horsepower or storage space to check spelling, someone realized that
proofreading on the screen was only 20% as effective as reading the hard
copy. After playing around with different colour combinations, they
improved it slightly - perhaps that's why DOS versions of Word Perfect
were grey letters on blue. It turns out that the artistic hemisphere of
the brain (left I think) interprets backlit information as presented by
a monitor, whereas the technical side of the brain (right hemisphere)
interprets reflected light as found on the printed page. The computer
monitor may be superior for reading a romance novel, but the printed
page is better for a technical manual.

2/ If you're doing design work, you are likely strong in your spatial
abilities. If you've read a manual, chances are you can open the book
within a few pages of the information you need. That's lost in the
on-line help.

3/ As you mentioned, the manual can go to the beach with you.

4/ The argument in favour of on-line help is that it saves trees.
Sounds honourable until you factor in people printing the on-line help,
single-sided on a laser printer.

5/ The only bonus to on-line help is that it can search for you - if you
know the right keywords. The winner on this one a couple of releases
ago, I haven't tried it recently, is looking up functions. You had to
know the keyword "Edit box functions" to find it. If the Germans had
encryption this good in WW II, the world would be a different place today.


Richard
*Caldwell, Larry
Message 13 of 13 (36 Views)

Re:

11-06-2002 10:57 PM in reply to: *Cross, Gary
Yeah ... we read Enigma code throughout most of the war, but we were reading
Purple before Dec. 7th 1941 as well.
~Larry

"Richard Hintehoeller" wrote in message
news:3DCA74C3.7070605@hfx.eastlink.ca...
> There are several reasons why I prefer books.
>
> 1/ Your retention is better. Many years ago, before computers had the
> horsepower or storage space to check spelling, someone realized that
> proofreading on the screen was only 20% as effective as reading the hard
> copy. After playing around with different colour combinations, they
> improved it slightly - perhaps that's why DOS versions of Word Perfect
> were grey letters on blue. It turns out that the artistic hemisphere of
> the brain (left I think) interprets backlit information as presented by
> a monitor, whereas the technical side of the brain (right hemisphere)
> interprets reflected light as found on the printed page. The computer
> monitor may be superior for reading a romance novel, but the printed
> page is better for a technical manual.
>
> 2/ If you're doing design work, you are likely strong in your spatial
> abilities. If you've read a manual, chances are you can open the book
> within a few pages of the information you need. That's lost in the
> on-line help.
>
> 3/ As you mentioned, the manual can go to the beach with you.
>
> 4/ The argument in favour of on-line help is that it saves trees.
> Sounds honourable until you factor in people printing the on-line help,
> single-sided on a laser printer.
>
> 5/ The only bonus to on-line help is that it can search for you - if you
> know the right keywords. The winner on this one a couple of releases
> ago, I haven't tried it recently, is looking up functions. You had to
> know the keyword "Edit box functions" to find it. If the Germans had
> encryption this good in WW II, the world would be a different place today.
>
>
> Richard
>

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