Installation & Licensing

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*[Autodesk], jerry milana
Message 1 of 1 (276 Views)

prerequisites for network deployment

276 Views, 0 Replies
09-20-1999 12:04 PM
Well, here comes my promised $.02.

The definitive answers to your questions can only come after analyzing your
organization's projected use of AutoCAD and your system and network resources.
Depending on the size and complexity of your organization, such an analysis
could be quite involved if it is to be valid. Expect to pay a fee for such
services and get an RFQ defined for product and services in return. Choose a
vendor that has experience integrating AutoCAD and AdLM in networked
environments.

Here are some general thoughts:

>What's the ratio of of seats to concurrent users that becomes a factor
I am not sure that I understand your question here. Using AdLM, you can deploy
AutoCAD to as many seats as you wish. AutoCAD can only be started on as many
workstations as you are licensed for.

>What's the minumum hardware requirement for effective network deployment
This depends on many factors. If you are going to run AutoCAD from executables
located on the server, you will want the fastest possible file server and a
fast, clean network. Running AutoCAD from executables deployed to each
workstation (we call this a Client Deployment) takes a large load off of the
network.

>How is that affected by drawings that use raster or solid modeling?
The more intense your drawing requirements are and the longer the hours your
operators will use AutoCAD, the more advisable using Client Deployments is.

>What kind of skill set is the manager of this mess going to need and how
>much time does he need to manage it(fulltime, part-time...)?
The answer to this has a lot more to do with your environment than it does with
the product itself. At a minimum, good network administration skills are
advisable to get this whole thing configured and running. What it will take to
keep it going will ba a factor of your systems and network stability, the amount
of control you desire over license availability and other factors.

>When is Network liscencing a bad idea?
Unstable networks, limited number of users, lack of network administration are
issues that come to my mind.

I hope some of this helps. Also visit
http://www.autodesk.com/support/autocad/techsol2.htm for more information on
AdLM.

Jerry

"Jerry Milana [Autodesk]" wrote:

> John,
>
> I'll add my $.02 to this thread when I get back to the office on Monday. In
> the meantime, you may want to read an article That a colleague and I wrote
> for Cadence Magazine at
> http://www.cadence-mag.com/1998/0198/issuefocus0198.html
>
> Jerry
>
> John Burrill wrote in message <37E27045.4338D0A4@netpass.com>...
> >I'm trying to come up with a set of guidelines that a company can use as
> >the basis for switching from local installations to floating liscences.
> >Some things I'd like to know:
> >What's the ratio of of seats to concurrent users that becomes a factor
> >What's the minumum hardware requirement for effective network deployment
> >
> >How is that affected by drawings that use raster or solid modeling?
> >What kind of skill set is the manager of this mess going to need and how
> >much time does he need to manage it(fulltime, part-time...)?
> >When is Network liscencing a bad idea?
> >I'd appreciate any responses.
> >John
> >

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