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New Member
donp
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎06-18-2001
Message 1 of 4 (222 Views)

domain rights stopping local AutoCAD from running

222 Views, 3 Replies
06-15-2001 07:36 AM
We've just created a master Win2000 image that attaches to our NT domain. I installed AutoCAD 14 and 2000 locally and tested it - OK. I then ghosted the drive to other workstations and logged in as a domain user and now both versions say that I need to reinstall AutoCAD. Turns out that the domain rights are disallowing the system from writing to the registry even though I've given the user administrator (local) rights. If I make the user a Domain Administrator everything works fine but this probably isn't a good idea. Anybody seen this, and more importantly, know what rights I should add so that I can leave the users as Domain User (rather than Doamin Admin) and still have Autocad function properly?

TIA
*Schroeder, Bud
Message 2 of 4 (222 Views)

Re: domain rights stopping local AutoCAD from running

06-16-2001 09:56 AM in reply to: donp
Hello,

 

The key here is that your Domain policies are
overwriting your local system policies and that is why you can not use
AutoCAD.  The default rights are most likely User or Guest.  One
solution would be to build a group for the CAD users and then build a system
policy.  Add the CAD group to the policy so that they have the rights
needed to run AutoCAD.

 

Be sure to back up before you do anything with
Policies on your PDC though.  Also if you have a separate test network that
your testing on that is the better way to learn how to use System
Policies.  You can also go one farther and create a Group Policy that opens
up the Registry to your Group.  Just open up HKLM\Software\Autodesk and all
the keys under this.  You also want to open up Classes Root.  There
are two many keys in this section to break it out so I would open up the entire
key.  You can give the group 
Read, Write, Execute and Delete access to the Policy. 

 

Hope this helps.

 

Bud

 

 

 



style="PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">We've
just created a master Win2000 image that attaches to our NT domain. I
installed AutoCAD 14 and 2000 locally and tested it - OK. I then ghosted the
drive to other workstations and logged in as a domain user and now both
versions say that I need to reinstall AutoCAD. Turns out that the domain
rights are disallowing the system from writing to the registry even though
I've given the user administrator (local) rights. If I make the user a Domain
Administrator everything works fine but this probably isn't a good idea.
Anybody seen this, and more importantly, know what rights I should add so that
I can leave the users as Domain User (rather than Doamin Admin) and still have
Autocad function properly?

TIA

New Member
donp
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎06-18-2001
Message 3 of 4 (222 Views)

Re:

06-19-2001 09:28 AM in reply to: donp
Bud - thanks for your detailed reply. If I want my users to have full access to their own computers, is it crazy to leave them as members of the Domain Admin group for this purpose? I'm not being lazy, but rather I'm intimidated by trying to create policies, etc.
*Nehls, Kevin
Message 4 of 4 (222 Views)

Re:

06-19-2001 11:37 PM in reply to: donp
Yes. You would be very, very crazy to make your users part of the Domain
Admin group. If you did this then they could do anything on the network
that they wanted to. Create/delete/alter User/Computer accounts, mess up
DNS, DHCP, WINS, in general, the could reack havok.

I would suggest creating a Global "AutoCAD Power Users" (or whatever you
want to call it) group. Then place your AutoCAD users into this group.
Then, at each workstation I would pull that Global "AutoCAD Power Users"
group into the Local "Power Users" group. This would give each user the
needed rights to run AutoCAD on Win2K without giving them admin rights on
their PC (bad) or Domain Admin rights (really, really bad). This way you
would also be able to manage who has Power User rights at the Domain level
(instead of the PC level), by just adding or removing users from the Global
"AutoCAD Power Users" group.

No need to create policies unless you want to further restrict what the
users can do on their PC.

HTH
--
Kevin Nehls


"donp" wrote in message
news:f05b26e.1@WebX.maYIadrTaRb...
> Bud - thanks for your detailed reply. If I want my users to have full
access to their own computers, is it crazy to leave them as members of the
Domain Admin group for this purpose? I'm not being lazy, but rather I'm
intimidated by trying to create policies, etc.
>

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