Installation & Licensing

Reply
*Plensdorf, Chris
Message 1 of 14 (231 Views)

Network Deploy Customization

231 Views, 13 Replies
11-06-2000 02:37 PM
I have seen this question in past posts with no response. Has anyone
experience with modifying files in the ACAD1.CAB file to affect a 'custom'
deployment of AutoCAD 2000i. Or can I modify the *.LST files to have
Windows Installer 'pull' additional files to the client? What do these
(*.LST) files accomplish?

I am having serious issues with the viability of network deployment if.....

1. I must install as an administrator. I do not want to grant
administrative priveledges to all CAD users. This means an administrator
must log on locally on every machine. This is eased somewhat in W2000 if I
can 'Run As' the Install Executable. I must still grant 'loose' permissions
to execute the program.

2. I must still customize every single workstation after installing 2000i
because I can not 'push'/'pull' custom menus, etc during the deployment. I
can not even modify a profile file and have the deployment modify the path
automatically to point to it. With 200+ users, having all files on the
network causes network traffic issues, therefore having files local is a
plus. Inclusion in a logon script could assist.

Am I missing something? Has anyone 'solved' this dilema?

Chris Plensdorf
Member
Nienberg
Posts: 5
Registered: ‎09-17-2001
Message 2 of 14 (231 Views)

Re: Network Deploy Customization

11-06-2000 09:36 PM in reply to: *Plensdorf, Chris
Contrary to my post of Oct 25, I have finally succeeded in deploying a custom installation using the Picture Taker program. A demo version comes on the Architectural Desktop CD as part of the migration tools, so I assume it is also on the Acad 2000i CD. Whether it is or not, I recommend downloading the latest demo version from Lanovation and using that, since it can create self installing files.

One thing to be careful about : Be sure to take a picture on a machine that has NEVER had 2000i installed on it, then install and customize, then take another picture. On my first attempt, I made the mistake of trying it on a machine that had previously had 2000 on it, and due to AutoDesk's incomplete uninstall process, not all of my changes were recognized.

In my case I was working from the original Architectural Desktop 2.0, then installing all of the updates, then doing a lot of customization, including changes to the file paths for networked profiles, etc. All in all, I completed about 25 steps after the basic install, and Picture Taker caught them and made an installation file that could be run from any machine for a complete install.

Mark Nienberg
Tipping Mar + associates
Berkeley CA
*Schroeder, Bud
Message 3 of 14 (231 Views)

Re:

11-06-2000 09:40 PM in reply to: *Plensdorf, Chris
Hmmm... What incomplete uninstall are you talking about? Also yes,
it's on the AutoCAD 2000i CD as well.

Please let us know what problems you had with the uninstall.

Thanks

Bud

Nienberg wrote:

> Contrary to my post of Oct 25, I have finally succeeded in deploying a
> custom installation using the Picture Taker program. A demo version
> comes on the Architectural Desktop CD as part of the migration tools,
> so I assume it is also on the Acad 2000i CD. Whether it is or not, I
> recommend downloading the latest demo version from Lanovation and
> using that, since it can create self installing files.
>
> One thing to be careful about : Be sure to take a picture on a machine
> that has NEVER had 2000i installed on it, then install and customize,
> then take another picture. On my first attempt, I made the mistake of
> trying it on a machine that had previously had 2000 on it, and due to
> AutoDesk's incomplete uninstall process, not all of my changes were
> recognized.
>
> In my case I was working from the original Architectural Desktop 2.0,
> then installing all of the updates, then doing a lot of customization,
> including changes to the file paths for networked profiles, etc. All
> in all, I completed about 25 steps after the basic install, and
> Picture Taker caught them and made an installation file that could be
> run from any machine for a complete install.
>
> Mark Nienberg
> Tipping Mar + associates
> Berkeley CA
*Schroeder, Bud
Message 4 of 14 (231 Views)

Re: Network Deploy Customization

11-06-2000 10:24 PM in reply to: *Plensdorf, Chris
Hi Chris,

Custom.lst will let you create a list of custom files you can copy with your
Deployment. Take a look in the Install guide for more information on this and
how it works.

As far as Administrator rights go, any application that needs to write to the
registry and replace core System files needs to have Administrative rights.
Once you have installed and ran AutoCAD once, you can change the rights back to
say power user. You could use VBScripts to do this. You could have them run at
login. One question I have though is why do you need to lock down the systems?

As far as doing a push or pull, you may want to look at programs like SMS do
this. There are also a lot of things you can do with VBS script files as well.

Hope this helps.

Bud

Custom.lst help file information:
=====================================
The AutoCAD setup application enables you to customize AutoCAD files or
supplement the installation with files of your own. You must add a file called
custom.lst to the Image directory in the client deployment location created by
the Network Setup Wizard. If this file exists, the AutoCAD setup application
will overwrite or add the files listed in custom.lst to the installation
directories on the client workstation.
The custom.lst file is a text file which must be placed in the Image directory.
Each line contains a source file name and an optional destination file name,
separated by a "greater than" sign (>). The file name can also contain a fully
qualified path. Blank lines are acceptable, and spaces are ignored at the
beginning and end of each line. If you do not include a fully qualified path,
source file names are relative to the Image directory. You must copy the
directories and files you reference in custom.lst into this directory.
Destination file names are relative to the directory where AutoCAD will be
installed. If no destination is provided, the source file base name with
extension is assumed.

When specifying source filenames, wildcard characters can be used. However, you
cannot rename files using wildcard characters.
The following is a sample custom.lst file.
data\test.lsp > test.lsp
t3.lsp >
t4.lsp > t5.lsp
MyCustomFiles\*.* > Support\*.*
MyDrawings\*.* >
MyLSP\Special.lsp >
In this example, the custom.lst file causes the following operations to be
performed:
1. The test.lsp file is copied from the Data directory in the Client deployment
location to the AutoCAD directory.

2. The t3.lsp file is copied from the Client deployment location to the AutoCAD
directory.
3. The t4.lsp file is copied from the Client deployment location to the AutoCAD
directory and renamed to t5.lsp.
4. The contents of the MyCustomFiles directory in the Client deployment location
are copied to the AutoCAD\Support directory.
5. The contents of the MyDrawing directory in the Client deployment location are
copied to the AutoCAD directory.
6. The MyLSP directory is created in the AutoCAD directory and the Special.lsp
file is copied into it.

The AutoCAD directory is the directory that contains the acad.exe file.
=====================================

Chris Plensdorf wrote:

> I have seen this question in past posts with no response. Has anyone
> experience with modifying files in the ACAD1.CAB file to affect a 'custom'
> deployment of AutoCAD 2000i. Or can I modify the *.LST files to have
> Windows Installer 'pull' additional files to the client? What do these
> (*.LST) files accomplish?
>
> I am having serious issues with the viability of network deployment if.....
>
> 1. I must install as an administrator. I do not want to grant
> administrative priveledges to all CAD users. This means an administrator
> must log on locally on every machine. This is eased somewhat in W2000 if I
> can 'Run As' the Install Executable. I must still grant 'loose' permissions
> to execute the program.
>
> 2. I must still customize every single workstation after installing 2000i
> because I can not 'push'/'pull' custom menus, etc during the deployment. I
> can not even modify a profile file and have the deployment modify the path
> automatically to point to it. With 200+ users, having all files on the
> network causes network traffic issues, therefore having files local is a
> plus. Inclusion in a logon script could assist.
>
> Am I missing something? Has anyone 'solved' this dilema?
>
> Chris Plensdorf
*Plensdorf, Chris
Message 5 of 14 (231 Views)

Re:

11-07-2000 05:23 AM in reply to: *Plensdorf, Chris
Thanks for the info.... and to answer your question, we prefer to lock down
our workstations to keep a 'basic' set of applications on the desktop. When
supporting several hundred stations, there are always a few (hundred?) that
prefer to install their own programs that cause problems with our standard
palette of application, (i.e. Napster, Real Player, shareware) Most of the
common apps we have being removed at logon, but locking the station simply
makes supporting any one workstation that much more consistent.

Chris

"Bud Schroeder" wrote in message
news:3A07A02C.AC8B6F80@sonic.net...
> Hi Chris,
>
> Custom.lst will let you create a list of custom files you can copy with
your
> Deployment. Take a look in the Install guide for more information on this
and
> how it works.
>
> As far as Administrator rights go, any application that needs to write to
the
> registry and replace core System files needs to have Administrative
rights.
> Once you have installed and ran AutoCAD once, you can change the rights
back to
> say power user. You could use VBScripts to do this. You could have them
run at
> login. One question I have though is why do you need to lock down the
systems?
>
> As far as doing a push or pull, you may want to look at programs like SMS
do
> this. There are also a lot of things you can do with VBS script files as
well.
>
> Hope this helps.
>
> Bud
>
> Custom.lst help file information:
> =====================================
> The AutoCAD setup application enables you to customize AutoCAD files or
> supplement the installation with files of your own. You must add a file
called
> custom.lst to the Image directory in the client deployment location
created by
> the Network Setup Wizard. If this file exists, the AutoCAD setup
application
> will overwrite or add the files listed in custom.lst to the installation
> directories on the client workstation.
> The custom.lst file is a text file which must be placed in the Image
directory.
> Each line contains a source file name and an optional destination file
name,
> separated by a "greater than" sign (>). The file name can also contain a
fully
> qualified path. Blank lines are acceptable, and spaces are ignored at the
> beginning and end of each line. If you do not include a fully qualified
path,
> source file names are relative to the Image directory. You must copy the
> directories and files you reference in custom.lst into this directory.
> Destination file names are relative to the directory where AutoCAD will be
> installed. If no destination is provided, the source file base name with
> extension is assumed.
>
> When specifying source filenames, wildcard characters can be used.
However, you
> cannot rename files using wildcard characters.
> The following is a sample custom.lst file.
> data\test.lsp > test.lsp
> t3.lsp >
> t4.lsp > t5.lsp
> MyCustomFiles\*.* > Support\*.*
> MyDrawings\*.* >
> MyLSP\Special.lsp >
> In this example, the custom.lst file causes the following operations to be
> performed:
> 1. The test.lsp file is copied from the Data directory in the Client
deployment
> location to the AutoCAD directory.
>
> 2. The t3.lsp file is copied from the Client deployment location to the
AutoCAD
> directory.
> 3. The t4.lsp file is copied from the Client deployment location to the
AutoCAD
> directory and renamed to t5.lsp.
> 4. The contents of the MyCustomFiles directory in the Client deployment
location
> are copied to the AutoCAD\Support directory.
> 5. The contents of the MyDrawing directory in the Client deployment
location are
> copied to the AutoCAD directory.
> 6. The MyLSP directory is created in the AutoCAD directory and the
Special.lsp
> file is copied into it.
>
> The AutoCAD directory is the directory that contains the acad.exe file.
> =====================================
>
> Chris Plensdorf wrote:
>
> > I have seen this question in past posts with no response. Has anyone
> > experience with modifying files in the ACAD1.CAB file to affect a
'custom'
> > deployment of AutoCAD 2000i. Or can I modify the *.LST files to have
> > Windows Installer 'pull' additional files to the client? What do these
> > (*.LST) files accomplish?
> >
> > I am having serious issues with the viability of network deployment
if.....
> >
> > 1. I must install as an administrator. I do not want to grant
> > administrative priveledges to all CAD users. This means an
administrator
> > must log on locally on every machine. This is eased somewhat in W2000 if
I
> > can 'Run As' the Install Executable. I must still grant 'loose'
permissions
> > to execute the program.
> >
> > 2. I must still customize every single workstation after installing
2000i
> > because I can not 'push'/'pull' custom menus, etc during the deployment.
I
> > can not even modify a profile file and have the deployment modify the
path
> > automatically to point to it. With 200+ users, having all files on the
> > network causes network traffic issues, therefore having files local is a
> > plus. Inclusion in a logon script could assist.
> >
> > Am I missing something? Has anyone 'solved' this dilema?
> >
> > Chris Plensdorf
>
*Plensdorf, Chris
Message 6 of 14 (231 Views)

Re:

11-07-2000 06:20 AM in reply to: *Plensdorf, Chris
Bud,

Where did you find the hlp on custom.lst? That is exactly the kind of info
I am looking for. Am I blind or has it been buried pretty deep?

Chris

"Bud Schroeder" wrote in message
news:3A07A02C.AC8B6F80@sonic.net...
> Hi Chris,
>
> Custom.lst will let you create a list of custom files you can copy with
your
> Deployment. Take a look in the Install guide for more information on this
and
> how it works.
>
> As far as Administrator rights go, any application that needs to write to
the
> registry and replace core System files needs to have Administrative
rights.
> Once you have installed and ran AutoCAD once, you can change the rights
back to
> say power user. You could use VBScripts to do this. You could have them
run at
> login. One question I have though is why do you need to lock down the
systems?
>
> As far as doing a push or pull, you may want to look at programs like SMS
do
> this. There are also a lot of things you can do with VBS script files as
well.
>
> Hope this helps.
>
> Bud
>
> Custom.lst help file information:
> =====================================
> The AutoCAD setup application enables you to customize AutoCAD files or
> supplement the installation with files of your own. You must add a file
called
> custom.lst to the Image directory in the client deployment location
created by
> the Network Setup Wizard. If this file exists, the AutoCAD setup
application
> will overwrite or add the files listed in custom.lst to the installation
> directories on the client workstation.
> The custom.lst file is a text file which must be placed in the Image
directory.
> Each line contains a source file name and an optional destination file
name,
> separated by a "greater than" sign (>). The file name can also contain a
fully
> qualified path. Blank lines are acceptable, and spaces are ignored at the
> beginning and end of each line. If you do not include a fully qualified
path,
> source file names are relative to the Image directory. You must copy the
> directories and files you reference in custom.lst into this directory.
> Destination file names are relative to the directory where AutoCAD will be
> installed. If no destination is provided, the source file base name with
> extension is assumed.
>
> When specifying source filenames, wildcard characters can be used.
However, you
> cannot rename files using wildcard characters.
> The following is a sample custom.lst file.
> data\test.lsp > test.lsp
> t3.lsp >
> t4.lsp > t5.lsp
> MyCustomFiles\*.* > Support\*.*
> MyDrawings\*.* >
> MyLSP\Special.lsp >
> In this example, the custom.lst file causes the following operations to be
> performed:
> 1. The test.lsp file is copied from the Data directory in the Client
deployment
> location to the AutoCAD directory.
>
> 2. The t3.lsp file is copied from the Client deployment location to the
AutoCAD
> directory.
> 3. The t4.lsp file is copied from the Client deployment location to the
AutoCAD
> directory and renamed to t5.lsp.
> 4. The contents of the MyCustomFiles directory in the Client deployment
location
> are copied to the AutoCAD\Support directory.
> 5. The contents of the MyDrawing directory in the Client deployment
location are
> copied to the AutoCAD directory.
> 6. The MyLSP directory is created in the AutoCAD directory and the
Special.lsp
> file is copied into it.
>
> The AutoCAD directory is the directory that contains the acad.exe file.
> =====================================
>
> Chris Plensdorf wrote:
>
> > I have seen this question in past posts with no response. Has anyone
> > experience with modifying files in the ACAD1.CAB file to affect a
'custom'
> > deployment of AutoCAD 2000i. Or can I modify the *.LST files to have
> > Windows Installer 'pull' additional files to the client? What do these
> > (*.LST) files accomplish?
> >
> > I am having serious issues with the viability of network deployment
if.....
> >
> > 1. I must install as an administrator. I do not want to grant
> > administrative priveledges to all CAD users. This means an
administrator
> > must log on locally on every machine. This is eased somewhat in W2000 if
I
> > can 'Run As' the Install Executable. I must still grant 'loose'
permissions
> > to execute the program.
> >
> > 2. I must still customize every single workstation after installing
2000i
> > because I can not 'push'/'pull' custom menus, etc during the deployment.
I
> > can not even modify a profile file and have the deployment modify the
path
> > automatically to point to it. With 200+ users, having all files on the
> > network causes network traffic issues, therefore having files local is a
> > plus. Inclusion in a logon script could assist.
> >
> > Am I missing something? Has anyone 'solved' this dilema?
> >
> > Chris Plensdorf
>
*Nehls, Kevin
Message 7 of 14 (231 Views)

Re:

11-07-2000 07:54 AM in reply to: *Plensdorf, Chris
Using Policies and Mandatory profiles, as well as a custom deployment of IE
that prevents the users from downloading files (they can still view pages,
but not download any files, pictures, programs, music, etc.) you can
accomplish this without having to lock down each workstation. If you use
policies and mandatory profiles you don't even have touch a workstation to
lock them down, the user gets locked down when they log into the network.
The only thing that this doesn't prevent them from doing is by bringing the
software on a floppy or CD, but with policies you can also lock down access
to those drives.

Then you don't have to mess around with permissions and worry that you screw
something up or that "oops we locked it down to far, now stuff doesn't work
and we have to walk around to 100's (or 1,000's) or workstations all over
again".

--
Kevin Nehls
remove -ns- for direct reply

"Chris Plensdorf" wrote in message
news:09AE9E437233D27EB2A15199DBDBABFC@in.WebX.SaUCah8kaAW...
> Thanks for the info.... and to answer your question, we prefer to lock
down
> our workstations to keep a 'basic' set of applications on the desktop.
When
> supporting several hundred stations, there are always a few (hundred?)
that
> prefer to install their own programs that cause problems with our standard
> palette of application, (i.e. Napster, Real Player, shareware) Most of
the
> common apps we have being removed at logon, but locking the station simply
> makes supporting any one workstation that much more consistent.
>
> Chris
*Schroeder, Bud
Message 8 of 14 (231 Views)

Re:

11-07-2000 06:34 PM in reply to: *Plensdorf, Chris
Hi Chris,

Yup. it's in there but hidden really well;-(.

Also when you do your deployment strategy, use the Advanced button on the
Network setup Wizard. That way you can create multiple deployments from the
same shared data tree. Oh yes as well as setup log files and the ACAD SERVER
Variable.

Bummer on the abuse on the network. I worked for a Utility for 12 years and I
just told them outright. If you abuse it, I will remove your rights or fire
you! I would leave the choice up to them;-)... That seemed to work out very
well for us.

Let me know if yo need any more help here.

Bud

Chris Plensdorf wrote:

> Thanks for the info.... and to answer your question, we prefer to lock down
> our workstations to keep a 'basic' set of applications on the desktop. When
> supporting several hundred stations, there are always a few (hundred?) that
> prefer to install their own programs that cause problems with our standard
> palette of application, (i.e. Napster, Real Player, shareware) Most of the
> common apps we have being removed at logon, but locking the station simply
> makes supporting any one workstation that much more consistent.
>
> Chris
>
> "Bud Schroeder" wrote in message
> news:3A07A02C.AC8B6F80@sonic.net...
> > Hi Chris,
> >
> > Custom.lst will let you create a list of custom files you can copy with
> your
> > Deployment. Take a look in the Install guide for more information on this
> and
> > how it works.
> >
> > As far as Administrator rights go, any application that needs to write to
> the
> > registry and replace core System files needs to have Administrative
> rights.
> > Once you have installed and ran AutoCAD once, you can change the rights
> back to
> > say power user. You could use VBScripts to do this. You could have them
> run at
> > login. One question I have though is why do you need to lock down the
> systems?
> >
> > As far as doing a push or pull, you may want to look at programs like SMS
> do
> > this. There are also a lot of things you can do with VBS script files as
> well.
> >
> > Hope this helps.
> >
> > Bud
> >
> > Custom.lst help file information:
> > =====================================
> > The AutoCAD setup application enables you to customize AutoCAD files or
> > supplement the installation with files of your own. You must add a file
> called
> > custom.lst to the Image directory in the client deployment location
> created by
> > the Network Setup Wizard. If this file exists, the AutoCAD setup
> application
> > will overwrite or add the files listed in custom.lst to the installation
> > directories on the client workstation.
> > The custom.lst file is a text file which must be placed in the Image
> directory.
> > Each line contains a source file name and an optional destination file
> name,
> > separated by a "greater than" sign (>). The file name can also contain a
> fully
> > qualified path. Blank lines are acceptable, and spaces are ignored at the
> > beginning and end of each line. If you do not include a fully qualified
> path,
> > source file names are relative to the Image directory. You must copy the
> > directories and files you reference in custom.lst into this directory.
> > Destination file names are relative to the directory where AutoCAD will be
> > installed. If no destination is provided, the source file base name with
> > extension is assumed.
> >
> > When specifying source filenames, wildcard characters can be used.
> However, you
> > cannot rename files using wildcard characters.
> > The following is a sample custom.lst file.
> > data\test.lsp > test.lsp
> > t3.lsp >
> > t4.lsp > t5.lsp
> > MyCustomFiles\*.* > Support\*.*
> > MyDrawings\*.* >
> > MyLSP\Special.lsp >
> > In this example, the custom.lst file causes the following operations to be
> > performed:
> > 1. The test.lsp file is copied from the Data directory in the Client
> deployment
> > location to the AutoCAD directory.
> >
> > 2. The t3.lsp file is copied from the Client deployment location to the
> AutoCAD
> > directory.
> > 3. The t4.lsp file is copied from the Client deployment location to the
> AutoCAD
> > directory and renamed to t5.lsp.
> > 4. The contents of the MyCustomFiles directory in the Client deployment
> location
> > are copied to the AutoCAD\Support directory.
> > 5. The contents of the MyDrawing directory in the Client deployment
> location are
> > copied to the AutoCAD directory.
> > 6. The MyLSP directory is created in the AutoCAD directory and the
> Special.lsp
> > file is copied into it.
> >
> > The AutoCAD directory is the directory that contains the acad.exe file.
> > =====================================
> >
> > Chris Plensdorf wrote:
> >
> > > I have seen this question in past posts with no response. Has anyone
> > > experience with modifying files in the ACAD1.CAB file to affect a
> 'custom'
> > > deployment of AutoCAD 2000i. Or can I modify the *.LST files to have
> > > Windows Installer 'pull' additional files to the client? What do these
> > > (*.LST) files accomplish?
> > >
> > > I am having serious issues with the viability of network deployment
> if.....
> > >
> > > 1. I must install as an administrator. I do not want to grant
> > > administrative priveledges to all CAD users. This means an
> administrator
> > > must log on locally on every machine. This is eased somewhat in W2000 if
> I
> > > can 'Run As' the Install Executable. I must still grant 'loose'
> permissions
> > > to execute the program.
> > >
> > > 2. I must still customize every single workstation after installing
> 2000i
> > > because I can not 'push'/'pull' custom menus, etc during the deployment.
> I
> > > can not even modify a profile file and have the deployment modify the
> path
> > > automatically to point to it. With 200+ users, having all files on the
> > > network causes network traffic issues, therefore having files local is a
> > > plus. Inclusion in a logon script could assist.
> > >
> > > Am I missing something? Has anyone 'solved' this dilema?
> > >
> > > Chris Plensdorf
> >
*Plensdorf, Chris
Message 9 of 14 (231 Views)

Re:

11-08-2000 07:47 AM in reply to: *Plensdorf, Chris
As I understand it, in W2K/AutoCAD 2000i I must have all CAD users assigned
as a Power User at the very minimum. This kind of requires certain
abilities to remain. We can not 'blanketly' deny all users from downloading
'any' file. Can I distinguish through IE what types of files? We also
currently use roaming profiles (subject to change though) for all users.
And the locking down of the floppy/CD is only begging for more support calls
to complete simple file tasks.

Chris Plensdorf

"Kevin Nehls" wrote in message
news:smileyvery-happy:F2F633BC3BA0489452E5EEF1309FDB3@in.WebX.SaUCah8kaAW...
> Using Policies and Mandatory profiles, as well as a custom deployment of
IE
> that prevents the users from downloading files (they can still view pages,
> but not download any files, pictures, programs, music, etc.) you can
> accomplish this without having to lock down each workstation. If you use
> policies and mandatory profiles you don't even have touch a workstation to
> lock them down, the user gets locked down when they log into the network.
> The only thing that this doesn't prevent them from doing is by bringing
the
> software on a floppy or CD, but with policies you can also lock down
access
> to those drives.
>
> Then you don't have to mess around with permissions and worry that you
screw
> something up or that "oops we locked it down to far, now stuff doesn't
work
> and we have to walk around to 100's (or 1,000's) or workstations all over
> again".
>
> --
> Kevin Nehls
> remove -ns- for direct reply
>
> "Chris Plensdorf" wrote in message
> news:09AE9E437233D27EB2A15199DBDBABFC@in.WebX.SaUCah8kaAW...
> > Thanks for the info.... and to answer your question, we prefer to lock
> down
> > our workstations to keep a 'basic' set of applications on the desktop.
> When
> > supporting several hundred stations, there are always a few (hundred?)
> that
> > prefer to install their own programs that cause problems with our
standard
> > palette of application, (i.e. Napster, Real Player, shareware) Most of
> the
> > common apps we have being removed at logon, but locking the station
simply
> > makes supporting any one workstation that much more consistent.
> >
> > Chris
>
*Nehls, Kevin
Message 10 of 14 (231 Views)

Re:

11-08-2000 08:16 AM in reply to: *Plensdorf, Chris
I understand all of that, I'm just saying that there are other options out
there so that you don't have to lock down the workstation, instead you can
use other means. I don't think that you can distinguish between filetypes
for IE, but you may be able to do this with a firewall. I know that one of
the firewall boxes that our company is looking at can do this with e-mail
attachments. You can set it up so that it will stripe out all attachments
or just certain ones. Then have it put the attachments into a different
location for them to be scanned or even physically looked at by someone in
the IT staff to see if the material in the attachment is appropriate.

BTW, with the use of policies you can set them up so that a use can only
execute certain programs. Then it will not matter what they install or what
they download. If it is not in the list of applications that they can run,
then they cannot run it. Also, with policies you can lock down other, more
important things. Such as the ability to edit the registry. Take a look at
the policy editor for W2K Professional to see all of the different options
that you can make. Also, IMHO, if you are trying to lock down what the
users can and cannot run by these other means, then the use of mandatory
profiles is an easy way to discourage 99% of the users out there.

I find Bud's suggestion to probably be the best and easiest to administer.
If you abuse your privileges, then they will either be taken away or you
will be fired.

--
Kevin Nehls
remove -ns- for direct reply

"Chris Plensdorf" wrote in message
news:smileyvery-happy:6FB204A7597747D9D467F0B14D46031@in.WebX.SaUCah8kaAW...
> As I understand it, in W2K/AutoCAD 2000i I must have all CAD users
assigned
> as a Power User at the very minimum. This kind of requires certain
> abilities to remain. We can not 'blanketly' deny all users from
downloading
> 'any' file. Can I distinguish through IE what types of files? We also
> currently use roaming profiles (subject to change though) for all users.
> And the locking down of the floppy/CD is only begging for more support
calls
> to complete simple file tasks.
>
> Chris Plensdorf

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