Installation & Licensing

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*Chadwell, Mike
Message 1 of 3 (92 Views)

Long Filenames Vs. old 8.3 Format?

92 Views, 2 Replies
02-14-2000 10:35 AM
Jerry, perhaps you can answer this?

For several years now, we've been using the "allowed" Long File Naming
formats. Within the constraints of AutoCAD, there are the obvious
limitations (block naming with no spaces & less than 32 characters; Xref

default naming an issue when the 8.3 is exceeded, etc.). I have a new
employee that has brought something to my attention, and I'm looking for

answers.

She claims that she was told years ago (by an Autodesk tech individual)
that AutoCAD has many issues with errant file corruption when using the
long file naming formats whether at the file name level or directory
structure level. She also claims that she has NEVER used the long file
naming format and has thus never experienced the type of corruptions
that I experience weekly in my office. My corruptions / issues with
drawings are extremely errant. Sometimes drawings just die, only to be
recovered by Inserting them into a NEW drawing (Recover will not work,
but Inserting into a new session does), sometimes I can't Bind an Xref
no matter what I do (zero descriptive messages when pressing F2 to get
the help screen, no concactenating long layer names, etc.)

Is there any truth to this? She is proposing a revision to our current
Project directory structure, and I'd like to know if this is a valid
concern.

Thanks,
Mike Chadwell
*Milana, Jerry
Message 2 of 3 (92 Views)

Re: Long Filenames Vs. old 8.3 Format?

02-15-2000 11:28 AM in reply to: *Chadwell, Mike
Mike,
Long file names, if kept within reason, should not be a problem on a pure
Microsoft network. I have seen problems related to long file names when
third party network operating systems are used on the server. In this case
you are at the mercy of the OS publisher for their compatibility level. One
thing I have found wise to avoid in general are spaces in file, directory or
share names.

Jerry Milana,
Autodesk Product Support

Mike Chadwell wrote:

> Jerry, perhaps you can answer this?
>
> For several years now, we've been using the "allowed" Long File Naming
> formats. Within the constraints of AutoCAD, there are the obvious
> limitations (block naming with no spaces & less than 32 characters; Xref
>
> default naming an issue when the 8.3 is exceeded, etc.). I have a new
> employee that has brought something to my attention, and I'm looking for
>
> answers.
>
> She claims that she was told years ago (by an Autodesk tech individual)
> that AutoCAD has many issues with errant file corruption when using the
> long file naming formats whether at the file name level or directory
> structure level. She also claims that she has NEVER used the long file
> naming format and has thus never experienced the type of corruptions
> that I experience weekly in my office. My corruptions / issues with
> drawings are extremely errant. Sometimes drawings just die, only to be
> recovered by Inserting them into a NEW drawing (Recover will not work,
> but Inserting into a new session does), sometimes I can't Bind an Xref
> no matter what I do (zero descriptive messages when pressing F2 to get
> the help screen, no concactenating long layer names, etc.)
>
> Is there any truth to this? She is proposing a revision to our current
> Project directory structure, and I'd like to know if this is a valid
> concern.
>
> Thanks,
> Mike Chadwell
*Chadwell, Mike
Message 3 of 3 (92 Views)

Re:

02-17-2000 07:45 AM in reply to: *Chadwell, Mike
Thanks Jerry, I knew I could count on your wisdom!

Unfortunately I am guilty of adding spaces into all kinds of things, directory
names, file names, etc. I guess my thinking needs to be revised. We are
running NT 4.0WS tied back to a Netware 5 Server, for your information. Thanks
again.

Mike

Jerry Milana wrote:

> Mike,
> Long file names, if kept within reason, should not be a problem on a pure
> Microsoft network. I have seen problems related to long file names when
> third party network operating systems are used on the server. In this case
> you are at the mercy of the OS publisher for their compatibility level. One
> thing I have found wise to avoid in general are spaces in file, directory or
> share names.
>
> Jerry Milana,
> Autodesk Product Support
>
> Mike Chadwell wrote:
>
> > Jerry, perhaps you can answer this?
> >
> > For several years now, we've been using the "allowed" Long File Naming
> > formats. Within the constraints of AutoCAD, there are the obvious
> > limitations (block naming with no spaces & less than 32 characters; Xref
> >
> > default naming an issue when the 8.3 is exceeded, etc.). I have a new
> > employee that has brought something to my attention, and I'm looking for
> >
> > answers.
> >
> > She claims that she was told years ago (by an Autodesk tech individual)
> > that AutoCAD has many issues with errant file corruption when using the
> > long file naming formats whether at the file name level or directory
> > structure level. She also claims that she has NEVER used the long file
> > naming format and has thus never experienced the type of corruptions
> > that I experience weekly in my office. My corruptions / issues with
> > drawings are extremely errant. Sometimes drawings just die, only to be
> > recovered by Inserting them into a NEW drawing (Recover will not work,
> > but Inserting into a new session does), sometimes I can't Bind an Xref
> > no matter what I do (zero descriptive messages when pressing F2 to get
> > the help screen, no concactenating long layer names, etc.)
> >
> > Is there any truth to this? She is proposing a revision to our current
> > Project directory structure, and I'd like to know if this is a valid
> > concern.
> >
> > Thanks,
> > Mike Chadwell

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