Installation & Licensing

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Distinguished Contributor
nickseman
Posts: 223
Registered: ‎11-19-2003
Message 1 of 6 (79 Views)

3rd post - Need info on deciphering ADLM log contents - Please help

79 Views, 5 Replies
03-29-2001 04:30 AM
Where can I find a description of what the various entries in the ADLM log actually mean ? For example, is it common to have the comment "bury_zombies: Too soon for next cleanup" as every other entry line entry ? I would like to be able to understand the various information better. We are having some problems with out licensing setup and I would like to try to zero in on the problem if possible. Thanks Nick
*martin, jason
Message 2 of 6 (79 Views)

Re: 3rd post - Need info on deciphering ADLM log contents - Please help

03-29-2001 04:40 AM in reply to: nickseman
Yes it's normal. There is no master document on the adlm log format. For some
information on the debug.log see TS42736.
What kind of problems are you having?

jason martin
frankfurt-short-bruza

"nickseman" <73322.3166@compuserve.com> wrote in message
news:f03b61c.-1@WebX.maYIadrTaRb...
Where can I find a description of what the various entries in the ADLM log actually mean ?
For example, is it common to have the comment "bury_zombies: Too soon for next cleanup" as
every other entry line entry ? I would like to be able to understand the various
information better. We are having some problems with out licensing setup and I would like
to try to zero in on the problem if possible. Thanks Nick
Distinguished Contributor
nickseman
Posts: 223
Registered: ‎11-19-2003
Message 3 of 6 (79 Views)

Re:

03-29-2001 04:50 AM in reply to: nickseman
Jason - Thanks for answering. We have continuous problems with individuals losing their licenses and being dropped out of AutoCAD, LDDt, etc. We are running eleven license servers, one in each office, all with unique licenses. We then set the acadserver variable in each location to enable that office to see its own license server plus two or three additional license servers for overflow. On occasion our WAN must overload or for whatever reason not allow the clients to communicate with servers outside the location and the drop outs begin. I have tried to review the license logs hoping to have "evidence" to present to the IT department illustrating the problem, however I do not understand all that I am seeing. I would like to look for corrupted packets etc. Any insight is appreciated. I am going to review the document that you recommended in you initial answer. Thanks again, Nick
*milana, jerry
Message 4 of 6 (79 Views)

Re:

03-29-2001 10:09 AM in reply to: nickseman
I don't think you are going to find the "evidence"
you are looking for in the adlm.log file.  You can ignore the zombie lines,
they are normal.  Some specific log file error messages are documented in
our online knowledgebase.  In your case, where traffic is preventing a
round trip of the license token fast enough, no specific error will occur. 
The license manager does not know the difference between that condition from a
system that crashed or shut down in a less than graceful manner.  You can
view the packet activity by increasing the log file verbosity to 9 and if you
know the hostname of the system(s) which had a failure and the time it occurred,
you can view the packets that came in but there will generally be no error
explaining why they stopped, the AdLM just doesn't know.

 

If this happens on a some what predictable pattern,
your IT department could put a packet tracer (sniffer) on line and monitor udp
port 1422 between a workstation likely to loose its license and the license
server.  Doing this, they can detect dropped or delayed packets.  If
packets are becoming corrupt, you will see a "invalid client" entry in the log
file, this is the only thing that is known to cause this log error entry. 
The invalid client entry is documented in out on line knowledge base, document
number TS42173.

 

jerry milana,

Autodesk Product Support


style="BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; PADDING-RIGHT: 0px">
Jason
- Thanks for answering. We have continuous problems with individuals losing
their licenses and being dropped out of AutoCAD, LDDt, etc. We are running
eleven license servers, one in each office, all with unique licenses. We then
set the acadserver variable in each location to enable that office to see its
own license server plus two or three additional license servers for overflow.
On occasion our WAN must overload or for whatever reason not allow the clients
to communicate with servers outside the location and the drop outs begin. I
have tried to review the license logs hoping to have "evidence" to present to
the IT department illustrating the problem, however I do not understand all
that I am seeing. I would like to look for corrupted packets etc. Any insight
is appreciated. I am going to review the document that you recommended in you
initial answer. Thanks again, Nick
*Brock
Message 5 of 6 (79 Views)

Re:

03-30-2001 07:58 AM in reply to: nickseman
What sort of time delay will cause this problem?

 

Brock


style="PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">

I don't think you are going to find the
"evidence" you are looking for in the adlm.log file.  You can ignore the
zombie lines, they are normal.  Some specific log file error messages are
documented in our online knowledgebase.  In your case, where traffic is
preventing a round trip of the license token fast enough, no specific error
will occur.  The license manager does not know the difference between
that condition from a system that crashed or shut down in a less than graceful
manner.  You can view the packet activity by increasing the log file
verbosity to 9 and if you know the hostname of the system(s) which had a
failure and the time it occurred, you can view the packets that came in but
there will generally be no error explaining why they stopped, the AdLM just
doesn't know.

 

If this happens on a some what predictable
pattern, your IT department could put a packet tracer (sniffer) on line and
monitor udp port 1422 between a workstation likely to loose its license and
the license server.  Doing this, they can detect dropped or delayed
packets.  If packets are becoming corrupt, you will see a "invalid
client" entry in the log file, this is the only thing that is known to cause
this log error entry.  The invalid client entry is documented in out on
line knowledge base, document number
class=apiValue>TS42173.

 

jerry milana,

Autodesk Product Support


style="PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">
Jason
- Thanks for answering. We have continuous problems with individuals losing
their licenses and being dropped out of AutoCAD, LDDt, etc. We are running
eleven license servers, one in each office, all with unique licenses. We
then set the acadserver variable in each location to enable that office to
see its own license server plus two or three additional license servers for
overflow. On occasion our WAN must overload or for whatever reason not allow
the clients to communicate with servers outside the location and the drop
outs begin. I have tried to review the license logs hoping to have
"evidence" to present to the IT department illustrating the problem, however
I do not understand all that I am seeing. I would like to look for corrupted
packets etc. Any insight is appreciated. I am going to review the document
that you recommended in you initial answer. Thanks again,
Nick
*milana, jerry
Message 6 of 6 (79 Views)

Re:

04-02-2001 04:51 AM in reply to: nickseman
A round trip has to occur within five seconds. Two
resend attempts are made.  If all three in a row fail to make it within
this time frame it is considered a fault.

 

jerry


style="BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; PADDING-RIGHT: 0px">

What sort of time delay will cause this
problem?

 

Brock


style="BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; PADDING-RIGHT: 0px">

I don't think you are going to find the
"evidence" you are looking for in the adlm.log file.  You can ignore
the zombie lines, they are normal.  Some specific log file error
messages are documented in our online knowledgebase.  In your case,
where traffic is preventing a round trip of the license token fast enough,
no specific error will occur.  The license manager does not know the
difference between that condition from a system that crashed or shut down in
a less than graceful manner.  You can view the packet activity by
increasing the log file verbosity to 9 and if you know the hostname of the
system(s) which had a failure and the time it occurred, you can view the
packets that came in but there will generally be no error explaining why
they stopped, the AdLM just doesn't know.

 

If this happens on a some what predictable
pattern, your IT department could put a packet tracer (sniffer) on line and
monitor udp port 1422 between a workstation likely to loose its license and
the license server.  Doing this, they can detect dropped or delayed
packets.  If packets are becoming corrupt, you will see a "invalid
client" entry in the log file, this is the only thing that is known to cause
this log error entry.  The invalid client entry is documented in out on
line knowledge base, document number
class=apiValue>TS42173.

 

jerry milana,

Autodesk Product Support


style="BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; PADDING-RIGHT: 0px">
Jason
- Thanks for answering. We have continuous problems with individuals
losing their licenses and being dropped out of AutoCAD, LDDt, etc. We are
running eleven license servers, one in each office, all with unique
licenses. We then set the acadserver variable in each location to enable
that office to see its own license server plus two or three additional
license servers for overflow. On occasion our WAN must overload or for
whatever reason not allow the clients to communicate with servers outside
the location and the drop outs begin. I have tried to review the license
logs hoping to have "evidence" to present to the IT department
illustrating the problem, however I do not understand all that I am
seeing. I would like to look for corrupted packets etc. Any insight is
appreciated. I am going to review the document that you recommended in you
initial answer. Thanks again,
Nick

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