Drafting Techniques

Reply
*Turvill, Paul
Message 11 of 23 (66 Views)

Re:

03-09-2000 04:44 PM in reply to: *ssr engineers, inc.
LOL. Too bad current keyboards have numeric pads; our right hand pinkies
need exercise, too (NumLock, for those too young to remember "PC" and
"XT" 88-key keyboards).
__
"Nik" wrote in message
news:38C81885.F10018B0@silcom.com...
> any way after all is said and done i don't see ssr engineers giving two
cents
> for all the discussions going on here , but really in our office also
we use a
> mixture same as everybody else and personally i haven't had any
problems
> hitting the caps lock key so as not to yell at other people online and
i
> commend myself and everybody else for putting in the time and energy
consuming
> caps lock key , i am actually thinking of quitting the gym since we get
such
> an excellent workout with the caps lock key and the rest of the
keyboard
> buddies
*Stachoni, Matt
Message 12 of 23 (66 Views)

Re: all caps text

03-11-2000 02:30 PM in reply to: *ssr engineers, inc.
You would be better off teaching people to use Capslock rather than trying
something drastic like changing a font. I personally use a CAPS command I
wrote that takes care of it in one stroke. If you use A2K there is a
(dos_capslock) function in the latest beta of DOSLib, that you can use to
make sure it's on at all times.

Think about this - you give a drawing to another company (consult or
client) and they bring it up in Acad, but using their version of Romans -
guess what? The caps are all over the place and you look like you don't
know how to type.

Matt
stachoni@bellatlantic.net

On Tue, 07 Mar 2000 14:18:02 -0600, "ssr engineers, inc."
wrote:

>I'm using romanS text & would like to be able to modify the *.shp to
>type all CAPS without having to use the CAPS LOCK key. If anyone could
>help Me.
*Medina, Alfredo
Message 13 of 23 (66 Views)

Re:

03-11-2000 09:53 PM in reply to: *ssr engineers, inc.
Matt,
I agree with you. Besides that, why would somebody spend precious time
redefining a font just to make it write in capital letters all the time?
There are also commands that change lower case to upper case and viceversa.
So, what's the deal about customizing a font in that way?
Not a good idea at all.

Alfredo Medina

Matt Stachoni wrote:

> You would be better off teaching people to use Capslock rather than trying
> something drastic like changing a font. I personally use a CAPS command I
> wrote that takes care of it in one stroke.(...)
*jmorris
Message 14 of 23 (66 Views)

Re:

03-13-2000 12:29 PM in reply to: *ssr engineers, inc.
>My clients started using "Book Title" caps for callouts and detail titles.

What are these?

-------------------------------
John Morris
*Martin, Jason
Message 15 of 23 (66 Views)

Re:

03-13-2000 06:30 PM in reply to: *ssr engineers, inc.
I'm Not Completely Sure But I Think That It's Something Like This.

Hth
Jason Martin
Frankfurt-Short-Bruza

jmorris@chromerod.com wrote in message ...
>>My clients started using "Book Title" caps for callouts and detail titles.
>
>
>What are these?
>
>-------------------------------
>John Morris
*Fonts, TC
Message 16 of 23 (66 Views)

Re:

03-14-2000 06:38 AM in reply to: *ssr engineers, inc.
It also uses lowercase for supporting words (of, to, the, etc).

--
David W. Edwards
Dave Edwards Consulting - Makers of TC Fonts
Tel: 334-221-7919 Fax: 334-221-7953
info@tcfonts.com - www.tcfonts.com

Jason Martin wrote in message
news:8ak8sm$phr39@adesknews2.autodesk.com...
> I'm Not Completely Sure But I Think That It's Something Like This.
>
> Hth
> Jason Martin
> Frankfurt-Short-Bruza
>
> jmorris@chromerod.com wrote in message ...
> >>My clients started using "Book Title" caps for callouts and detail
titles.
> >
> >
> >What are these?
> >
> >-------------------------------
> >John Morris
>
>
*Thomson, Hugh
Message 17 of 23 (66 Views)

Re: all caps text

03-19-2000 01:31 PM in reply to: *ssr engineers, inc.
Someone on this thread asked - "why are drawings normally created using
uppercase text?"

From my own experience, I spent four years training to be a draughtsman in
1976. Manual draughting of course being the norm at that time. The technique
taught was for all text to be uppercase. Traditionally this has always been
the case.

However there is a practical reason for this and one I must say still
pertains to the actual use of drawings today. The idea is something to do
with using drawings in manufacturing and installation. Drawings in common
use tend to get rather dirty, with fingerprints, oil stains, dirt etc.
Apparently if the text notes are all uppercase at 3.5mm the text can usually
remain legible, whereas if the text is mixed case then it is easily obscured
by the actual use of a drawing in the working environment. Of course the
3.5mm text height was introduced to provide clearly defined text when the
drawing was archived on microfilm which may also relate to the uppercase
usage.

The mechanics for creation of drawings has certainly changed, but the end is
use is invariably the same.

Regards

Hugh Thomson
*Carey, Granville
Message 18 of 23 (66 Views)

Re:

03-19-2000 09:38 PM in reply to: *ssr engineers, inc.
Over 35 years, my architectural office (26 + draftspersons) used all caps
for
all manual lettering: room identification, schedules, titles, specific
notes,
general notes, etc. It was determined that in manual drafting it was
quicker
to letter in all caps.

With the advent of CAD this became even more apparent - eliminated the
use of the shift key and speeded up the keyboard action, reduced misspelling
(before spell checkers), plus gave consistent readability of prints. Just
my 2 scents worth. 8>)

Hugh Thomson wrote in message <8b3g12$ira1@adesknews2.autodesk.com>...
>Someone on this thread asked - "why are drawings normally created using
>uppercase text?"
>
>From my own experience, I spent four years training to be a draughtsman in
>1976. Manual draughting of course being the norm at that time. The
technique
>taught was for all text to be uppercase. Traditionally this has always been
>the case.
>
>However there is a practical reason for this and one I must say still
>pertains to the actual use of drawings today. The idea is something to do
>with using drawings in manufacturing and installation. Drawings in common
>use tend to get rather dirty, with fingerprints, oil stains, dirt etc.
>Apparently if the text notes are all uppercase at 3.5mm the text can
usually
>remain legible, whereas if the text is mixed case then it is easily
obscured
>by the actual use of a drawing in the working environment. Of course the
>3.5mm text height was introduced to provide clearly defined text when the
>drawing was archived on microfilm which may also relate to the uppercase
>usage.
>
>The mechanics for creation of drawings has certainly changed, but the end
is
>use is invariably the same.
>
>Regards
>
>Hugh Thomson
>
>
>
*White, Ian A.
Message 19 of 23 (66 Views)

Re:

03-19-2000 11:02 PM in reply to: *ssr engineers, inc.
On Mon, 20 Mar 2000 00:38:13 -0500, "Granville Carey"
wrote:

>Over 35 years, my architectural office (26 + draftspersons) used all caps
>for
>all manual lettering: room identification, schedules, titles, specific
>notes,
>general notes, etc. It was determined that in manual drafting it was
>quicker
>to letter in all caps.
>
>With the advent of CAD this became even more apparent - eliminated the
>use of the shift key and speeded up the keyboard action, reduced misspelling
>(before spell checkers), plus gave consistent readability of prints. Just
>my 2 scents worth. 8>)

One of the main reasons for all uppercase text on engineering drawings
is clarity. Lowercase characters can cause a lot of confusion.
Although with the number of drawing offices which insist on using the
TXT.SHX font, I don't suppose there would be any diminishing of
confusion ;-)

--

Ian A. White, CPEng
WAI Engineering
Sydney 2000
Australia

Ph: +61 418 203 229
Fax: +61 2 9622 0450
*Moffet, Dan
Message 20 of 23 (66 Views)

Re:

03-21-2000 06:53 AM in reply to: *ssr engineers, inc.
I'm from the old school too - all caps for legibility in hand lettered
drawings, with
reproduction being fuzzier than the original. Important stuff was done with
stencils and Leroy.
Cad and direct plot output (not blueline printed) has made things much
better, but the work site is stil a dirty place (construction or shop
floor).

What bugs me is that some offices spend all that money on cad, plotters etc.
and then insist on using handlet fonts "because it looks nicer".
Aaaarrrrgggghhhhh.

Hugh Thomson wrote in message
news:8b3g12$ira1@adesknews2.autodesk.com...
> Someone on this thread asked - "why are drawings normally created using
> uppercase text?"
>
> From my own experience, I spent four years training to be a draughtsman in
> 1976. Manual draughting of course being the norm at that time. The
technique
> taught was for all text to be uppercase. Traditionally this has always
been
> the case.
>
> However there is a practical reason for this and one I must say still
> pertains to the actual use of drawings today. The idea is something to do
> with using drawings in manufacturing and installation. Drawings in common
> use tend to get rather dirty, with fingerprints, oil stains, dirt etc.
> Apparently if the text notes are all uppercase at 3.5mm the text can
usually
> remain legible, whereas if the text is mixed case then it is easily
obscured
> by the actual use of a drawing in the working environment. Of course the
> 3.5mm text height was introduced to provide clearly defined text when the
> drawing was archived on microfilm which may also relate to the uppercase
> usage.
>
> The mechanics for creation of drawings has certainly changed, but the end
is
> use is invariably the same.
>
> Regards
>
> Hugh Thomson
>
>
>

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