Drafting Techniques

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Message 1 of 23 (40,645 Views)
Accepted Solution

Ramp Plan Symbol...?

40645 Views, 22 Replies
10-18-2007 02:03 PM
Group,

Drafting a ramp in plan - can someone tell me what is the correct symbol orientation to indicate direction of slope?

* please see attached image *

Thanks,

-STU
Distinguished Contributor
Posts: 3,729
Registered: ‎12-17-2003
Message 2 of 23 (40,642 Views)

Re: Ramp Plan Symbol...?

10-18-2007 02:09 PM in reply to: spinalfarm
I've never seen a ramp denoted that way. Just an arrow and and "up" or "down."
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Posts: 4,414
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Message 3 of 23 (40,641 Views)

Re: Ramp Plan Symbol...?

10-18-2007 02:33 PM in reply to: spinalfarm
What do the long diagonal lines signify?

By typical convention, lines such as these indicate a change in the plane of the surface. But, to be consistent, the (assumedly) flat landing at the end of the line intersection in the middle of the joint would have some sort of similar lines extending away from the (low?/high?) point.

As far as the arrow and notation go, I usually extend the arrow and leader the entire length of the ramp to assist in defining the start and end point of the sloping surface.
*Marty
Message 4 of 23 (40,641 Views)

Re: Ramp Plan Symbol...?

10-18-2007 03:32 PM in reply to: spinalfarm
Can't say for sure which one is correct, but image "A" seems more natural
and is what I've seen most of on Arch Plans, but what do I know!


wrote in message news:5754319@discussion.autodesk.com...
Group,

Drafting a ramp in plan - can someone tell me what is the correct symbol
orientation to indicate direction of slope?

* please see attached image *

Thanks,

-STU
*Chas
Message 5 of 23 (40,641 Views)

Re: Ramp Plan Symbol...?

10-18-2007 04:42 PM in reply to: spinalfarm
And the correct answer is ,.....drum roll,......"B".

Chas
wrote in message news:5754319@discussion.autodesk.com...
Group,

Drafting a ramp in plan - can someone tell me what is the correct symbol
orientation to indicate direction of slope?

* please see attached image *

Thanks,

-STU
Distinguished Contributor
Posts: 3,729
Registered: ‎12-17-2003
Message 6 of 23 (40,641 Views)

Re: Ramp Plan Symbol...?

10-19-2007 05:46 AM in reply to: spinalfarm
>what I've seen most of on Arch Plans

II don't know your background or that of Chas, but just to note, I''ve been a licensed architect for over 20 years, after about a dozen years prior drafting experience, and I've never seen such an indication at all. I happen to know teiarch also has a long background in architecture.

And both of us are going, "Huh?" Like he said, I see no need for the diagonal lines, which would appear to falsely iindicate changes in plane. I don't know where this supposed convention came from, but it's completely alien to me.
*August
Message 7 of 23 (40,641 Views)

Re: Ramp Plan Symbol...?

10-19-2007 09:00 AM in reply to: spinalfarm
I run into this quite a bit working with legacy drawings of public works,
like airports and stadiums. We are given seed drawings of lease areas for
retail and food service development.
At first I asked questions of the DOA Engineering to determine the exact
meaning and direction. I didn't question the source of their conventions.

Aug
wrote in message news:5754874@discussion.autodesk.com...
>what I've seen most of on Arch Plans

II don't know your background or that of Chas, but just to note, I''ve been
a licensed architect for over 20 years, after about a dozen years prior
drafting experience, and I've never seen such an indication at all. I happen
to know teiarch also has a long background in architecture.

And both of us are going, "Huh?" Like he said, I see no need for the
diagonal lines, which would appear to falsely iindicate changes in plane. I
don't know where this supposed convention came from, but it's completely
alien to me.
Distinguished Contributor
Posts: 3,729
Registered: ‎12-17-2003
Message 8 of 23 (40,641 Views)

Re: Ramp Plan Symbol...?

10-19-2007 11:24 AM in reply to: spinalfarm
Interesting. Maybe it's industry-specific.. I've worked with hundreds of business/commercial site plans and never encountered this. Frankly it looks clluttered and confusing to me.
*TRJ
Message 9 of 23 (40,641 Views)

Re: Ramp Plan Symbol...?

10-22-2007 09:16 PM in reply to: spinalfarm
Almost every "cabinet" elevation drawing I've ever seen uses this type of
symbolism. The vertex is at the hinge side of the doors. Have you ever seen
such?


wrote in message news:5754874@discussion.autodesk.com...
>what I've seen most of on Arch Plans

II don't know your background or that of Chas, but just to note, I''ve been
a licensed architect for over 20 years, after about a dozen years prior
drafting experience, and I've never seen such an indication at all. I happen
to know teiarch also has a long background in architecture.

And both of us are going, "Huh?" Like he said, I see no need for the
diagonal lines, which would appear to falsely iindicate changes in plane. I
don't know where this supposed convention came from, but it's completely
alien to me.
*Glenn White
Message 10 of 23 (40,641 Views)

Re: Ramp Plan Symbol...?

10-23-2007 06:01 AM in reply to: spinalfarm
sure - doors too. but, ramps don't open (well, if they did - it would make
for a heck of a ride). ;-)

"TRJ" wrote in message news:5757715@discussion.autodesk.com...
Almost every "cabinet" elevation drawing I've ever seen uses this type of
symbolism. The vertex is at the hinge side of the doors. Have you ever seen
such?


wrote in message news:5754874@discussion.autodesk.com...
>what I've seen most of on Arch Plans

II don't know your background or that of Chas, but just to note, I''ve been
a licensed architect for over 20 years, after about a dozen years prior
drafting experience, and I've never seen such an indication at all. I happen
to know teiarch also has a long background in architecture.

And both of us are going, "Huh?" Like he said, I see no need for the
diagonal lines, which would appear to falsely iindicate changes in plane. I
don't know where this supposed convention came from, but it's completely
alien to me.

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