CAD Managers

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*Murrah, Scott
Message 21 of 40 (519 Views)

Re:

01-25-2001 05:21 AM in reply to: kartz
I have been drafting and designing with AutoCAD (R12 - R2000i) and LDD (S8 -
LDDR2i) for the last 5 years. I will be graduating with my engineering
degree in May of 2002. I can't see myself redlining drawings for a drafter
to interpret. I would rather create the drawing myself so that I am
familiar with every aspect of the site. I can learn more about a site by
drawing it up myself, than looking at a plotted site plan for a couple of
minutes to redline. The more time I spend in a drawing, the more details I
pick up. There have been numerous occasions when clients call up asking for
revisions (ie. move an access drive to a new location), and I am able to
tell them right then about problems that could occur (ie. fire hydrant or
power pole at that location). These are things that I would not have known
if someone else had created the drawing. After creating the site drawings,
I then turn them over to the drafters for them to add dimensions,
coordinates, notes, etc.

Other engineers may have photographic memories, and can memorize a whole
site in a couple of minutes, but unfortunately, I'm not one of those. So,
for my $.02, I think that engineers/arch. should create their own drawings.
As far as the final drafting (things mentioned above), I believe that can be
handed off to the drafters.

Scott
*Murrah, Scott
Message 22 of 40 (519 Views)

Re:

01-25-2001 06:37 AM in reply to: kartz
The last line of my input above sounded a little harsh the second time I
read it. I just want to clarify:

I don't mean to degrade "drafter". Drafting is an art form, and it is a
form that I am still learning. I have never drafted on a board, and have
not seen drawings that were done on the board, so I can only speculate about
the visual aspects of the drawings. I can send a set of drawings out that
look good to me, that get the point across, and that could be built with
minimal RFI's. I would love to see drawings that were done on the "board",
just so that I can have an idea of what board drafting really is. The firm
I work at is only 8 years old, so the archived drawings here are all on
disk. We have a full time drafter here that graduated from the local junior
college this year that does most of the finish work. He took one class that
taught drafting from the "board", but I am sure it is nothing like what it
used to be.

Again, didn't mean to sound condescending towards drafters.....

Scott
*James Wedding, E.I.T.
Message 23 of 40 (519 Views)

Re:

01-25-2001 06:40 AM in reply to: kartz
You looking for a job, Scott? Where are you graduating from with that great
BSE? Give me an e-mail shotu if you feel like talking...

--
James Wedding, E.I.T.
IT Manager
Jones & Boyd, Inc.
Dallas, Texas
jwedding@NOSPAMjones-boyd.com
Remove NOSPAM from e-mail for reply.
*Luedke, Joel
Message 24 of 40 (519 Views)

Re:

01-25-2001 07:20 AM in reply to: kartz
Ah the possessiveness of an engineer.....

As a Cad Manager I can tell you that you will not have much time for
creating the drawings and site plans unless it is for a rather small project
and the company is small enough that you can focus all of your time on one
project at a time.

just my $0.02 worth.
No harm done by the first comment.

Joel

"Scott Murrah" wrote in message
news:4AE03564DF6129903C022ABAE774089A@in.WebX.SaUCah8kaAW...
> I have been drafting and designing with AutoCAD (R12 - R2000i) and LDD
(S8 -
> LDDR2i) for the last 5 years. I will be graduating with my engineering
> degree in May of 2002. I can't see myself redlining drawings for a
drafter
> to interpret. I would rather create the drawing myself so that I am
> familiar with every aspect of the site. I can learn more about a site by
> drawing it up myself, than looking at a plotted site plan for a couple of
> minutes to redline. The more time I spend in a drawing, the more details
I
> pick up. There have been numerous occasions when clients call up asking
for
> revisions (ie. move an access drive to a new location), and I am able to
> tell them right then about problems that could occur (ie. fire hydrant or
> power pole at that location). These are things that I would not have
known
> if someone else had created the drawing. After creating the site
drawings,
> I then turn them over to the drafters for them to add dimensions,
> coordinates, notes, etc.
>
> Other engineers may have photographic memories, and can memorize a whole
> site in a couple of minutes, but unfortunately, I'm not one of those. So,
> for my $.02, I think that engineers/arch. should create their own
drawings.
> As far as the final drafting (things mentioned above), I believe that can
be
> handed off to the drafters.
>
> Scott
>
*Audie
Message 25 of 40 (519 Views)

Re:

01-25-2001 07:47 AM in reply to: kartz
Joel,

It all depends on how you do it. I just finished preliminary plans for a
128 lot subdivision (80 acres) while working on several other projects
(construction costs from $100k to $65m). I am in the process of training a
new engineer (4 mos. out of school), and a new draftsman (9 mos. out of
school). I did probably 80% of the engineering and
drafting.
If the designer is using the tool (CADD) at a reasonable level he/she can
produce so much of the design/drafting there isn't much left but cleanup and
labeling. I agree completely with Scott. Cleanup involves making a set of
plans graphically complete. This is a discipline in itself. I have worked
on the board and with CAD. Either way, a great design is meaningless if the
information can't be read on the plans.
Engineers need to make it work. Drafters have to make it understandable
(readable/presentable). They are two entirely different things. Some
people are multi-talented. some are not.

Again, just my $0.02,
Audie Osgood, P.E.
CADD Manager

Joel Luedke wrote in message
news:506EE1F3AF2F335633B230BEEAB81725@in.WebX.SaUCah8kaAW...
> Ah the possessiveness of an engineer.....
>
> As a Cad Manager I can tell you that you will not have much time for
> creating the drawings and site plans unless it is for a rather small
project
> and the company is small enough that you can focus all of your time on one
> project at a time.
>
> just my $0.02 worth.
> No harm done by the first comment.
>
> Joel
>
> "Scott Murrah" wrote in message
> news:4AE03564DF6129903C022ABAE774089A@in.WebX.SaUCah8kaAW...
> > I have been drafting and designing with AutoCAD (R12 - R2000i) and LDD
> (S8 -
> > LDDR2i) for the last 5 years. I will be graduating with my engineering
> > degree in May of 2002. I can't see myself redlining drawings for a
> drafter
> > to interpret. I would rather create the drawing myself so that I am
> > familiar with every aspect of the site. I can learn more about a site
by
> > drawing it up myself, than looking at a plotted site plan for a couple
of
> > minutes to redline. The more time I spend in a drawing, the more
details
> I
> > pick up. There have been numerous occasions when clients call up asking
> for
> > revisions (ie. move an access drive to a new location), and I am able to
> > tell them right then about problems that could occur (ie. fire hydrant
or
> > power pole at that location). These are things that I would not have
> known
> > if someone else had created the drawing. After creating the site
> drawings,
> > I then turn them over to the drafters for them to add dimensions,
> > coordinates, notes, etc.
> >
> > Other engineers may have photographic memories, and can memorize a whole
> > site in a couple of minutes, but unfortunately, I'm not one of those.
So,
> > for my $.02, I think that engineers/arch. should create their own
> drawings.
> > As far as the final drafting (things mentioned above), I believe that
can
> be
> > handed off to the drafters.
> >
> > Scott
> >
>
*Murrah
Message 26 of 40 (519 Views)

Re:

01-25-2001 08:24 AM in reply to: kartz
Your exactly right!! Our firm is small....the engineer, an EIT, office
manager, drafter, and myself. The EIT and myself split the projects, and we
share the drafter. We complete the design, and send the drawings to the
drafter for final labeling etc. If the EIT has the drafter swamped, then I
do the drafting, and visa versa. After I go through my drawings and make
changes and/or corrections, I send them to my boss for his redlining. Most
of his corrections are for appearance, rather than design. This is where I
would like to see the "board" drawings, so that I can compare my drawings to
them. This is the only firm that I have worked for, so I don't have a
feeling for what's good, and what's not, only my boss's word. I can produce
drawings that can be built, but my aesthetics probably need a little work!!
:smileywink:

I think I would have to disagree on the ego....I don't think it's ego, more
like protection. If I'm signing my name to a set of drawings, I want to be
absolutely sure that they are correct, therefore I create the drawings. I
guess it would come down to the drafter. Or more to the point, how well do
you trust the drafter. The drafter we have is young. He's getting there,
but he has a long way to go.

When I started here, I had ZERO computer experience. The only computer I
had was a Commodore 64 that my parents got me in Junior High....(ok, don't
laugh)....I took a CAD class at the local Junior College, applied here, and
luckily he was in a bind and took me in. I had no engineering experience,
(hadn't even started on my degree yet), and in 5 years, I am designing
projects, am now the CAD manager, computer manager etc. Everything I know I
have picked up by watching. I haven't been able to learn the drafting,
because there is no one to watch. I have nothing to gauge myself against.
(Except the boss...)

Scott
*Murrah
Message 27 of 40 (519 Views)

Re:

01-25-2001 08:26 AM in reply to: kartz
I will be graduating from Texas A&M University in May of 2002, so I still
have a while before I can get serious about relocating. However, you can
bet a resume has your name on it!!! :smileywink:

Scott Murrah
Beach Engineers, Inc.

> You looking for a job, Scott? Where are you graduating from with that
great
> BSE? Give me an e-mail shotu if you feel like talking...
>
> --
> James Wedding, E.I.T.
> IT Manager
> Jones & Boyd, Inc.
> Dallas, Texas
> jwedding@NOSPAMjones-boyd.com
> Remove NOSPAM from e-mail for reply.
>
*Murrah
Message 28 of 40 (519 Views)

Re:

01-25-2001 09:49 AM in reply to: kartz
> I think I would have to disagree on the ego....>

OOPs, didn't mean ego...meant the possessiveness..

Scott
*Crnila, Damir
Message 29 of 40 (519 Views)

Re:

04-03-2001 08:53 AM in reply to: kartz
Hi,

I am B.Sc. of mechanical engineering, and graduated on cranes
and conveyors. After my study I specialized in HVAC design.
I've been using
computer for four years now. Started with Quick basic, and now use CAD
and
GIS software:

 


size=2>Unigraphics
Pro/Engineer
Inventor
SolidWorks
Mechanical
Desktop
Steel Detailing System
STAAD Design Studio
MathCAD (I consider
it CAD, although it's not for modeling)
AutoCAD
RhinoCeros
Nemetschek
AllPlan
Architectural Desktop
3D Studio
VIZ
ArchiCAD
Arc/Info
ArcView (with Spatial Analyst and 3D
Analyst)
MapInfo
AutoCAD Map
CAD Overlay
Trimble Survey Office
I
won't mention other non-CAD software I use. I'm lecturing engineers and
architects to
use CAD and GIS software (mostly easy AutoCAD and
ArcView)

 

Now I work in a company for urban planing and architects call
me drafter.
Architects over here even dont know how to turn on a computer
(literaly) and don't want to know.
There are a few technicians who make their
plans. They use only ArcView (2D) and I made for them all the customizations to
improve their job. Also I take care about network problems. When someone come to
our company and asks an architect to print a plan, he's not able to do it, even
not to present his ideas if technician who drew it is not here. Someone asked an
architect: "Who actualy did it?"
Let's get back to making projects. When I
make a project, I make it better, faster and cheaper when I do it myself,
because I put my idea right on 3D model, and at the same time make all the
variations and analisys. I think it's too much to expect from a technician to do
this. If he can understand and use all the software I do, then I will let him
design too.

 

Damir Crnila
*Butler, Joe
Message 30 of 40 (519 Views)

Re:

04-03-2001 10:06 AM in reply to: kartz
It seems to me, & I have no degree just a lots
of hard work & studying, that some of the engineers I've worked for think
that the only tools they need a calculator & a red pencil. It is surprising
using some of today's software just how much designing a "drafter" can
do

JoeB


style="PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">

Hi,

I am B.Sc. of mechanical engineering, and graduated on
cranes and conveyors. After my study I specialized in HVAC design.
I've
been using computer for four years now. Started with Quick basic, and now use
CAD
and GIS software:

 


size=2>Unigraphics
Pro/Engineer
Inventor
SolidWorks
Mechanical
Desktop
Steel Detailing System
STAAD Design Studio
MathCAD (I
consider it CAD, although it's not for
modeling)
AutoCAD
RhinoCeros
Nemetschek AllPlan
Architectural
Desktop
3D Studio VIZ
ArchiCAD
Arc/Info
ArcView (with Spatial
Analyst and 3D Analyst)
MapInfo
AutoCAD Map
CAD Overlay
Trimble
Survey Office
I won't mention other non-CAD software I use. I'm lecturing
engineers and architects to
use CAD and GIS software (mostly easy AutoCAD
and ArcView)

 

Now I work in a company for urban planing and architects
call me drafter.
Architects over here even dont know how to turn on a
computer (literaly) and don't want to know.
There are a few technicians who
make their plans. They use only ArcView (2D) and I made for them all the
customizations to improve their job. Also I take care about network problems.
When someone come to our company and asks an architect to print a plan, he's
not able to do it, even not to present his ideas if technician who drew it is
not here. Someone asked an architect: "Who actualy did it?"
Let's get back
to making projects. When I make a project, I make it better, faster and
cheaper when I do it myself, because I put my idea right on 3D model, and at
the same time make all the variations and analisys. I think it's too much to
expect from a technician to do this. If he can understand and use all the
software I do, then I will let him design too.

 

Damir Crnila

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