CAD Managers

Reply
*Furman, Paul
Message 1 of 9 (127 Views)

CADmanager... NOT

127 Views, 8 Replies
11-29-2000 04:33 PM
We are a small office & for years I was the only
person on CAD. There is gradually becoming the
need for some level of management of the computer
system but I'm not eager to impose my way as the
law on folks, especially without monetary
recognition of the need from above and without
having any official authority. I understand the
idea of working with the users to gain consensus
but the boss isn't a user so that doesn't help my
position.

We recently got a new manager to schedule projects
& workhours which is OK with me, I don't want to
manage people really but the need is becoming
apparent & I'm the appropriate person to be doing
the CAD manager type work. We're getting by OK,
I'm happy to answer questions for everyone but
there is a lot of fumbling around whereas if we
got together & had some classes & discussions, it
might save a good bit of wasted time. If it's not
my project & they don't ask questions, I keep my
nose out of it & let them fumble.

Any suggestions how to get a raise & some
authority over the situation?

For instance, I'm not particularly motivated to go
out & use my credit card & file it on the expense
report to purchase small equiptment like software
utilities, mice, etc. when my opinion isn't taken
seriously when it comes time to make major
purchase descisions like a network
upgrade/consultant or new computers. So far, I'm
mostly just sitting back & waiting till they
realize they need help. I fear this won't work.
*Tutt, Trevor
Message 2 of 9 (127 Views)

Re: CADmanager... NOT

11-29-2000 11:02 PM in reply to: *Furman, Paul
I wish I could help you, but I once found myself in just the position
you are trying to avoid. All of the responsibility and none of the
actual authority. I was contantly having to go to management to get
the rules enforced, and each time I had to convince them that this is
the way we want to do things. If any user felt like doing it a
different way, they just did because they knew that If I complained
about it they could just go to their project managers and cry about
how what I wanted them to do would just take too long and cost the
project money.

I was able to prove to them time and again that the standards that I
was trying to enforce were the right thing to do. I was able to point
out different aspects of the standards on different projects that had
fallen into trouble, and they still didn't learn.

I am not the greatest salesman so that may have been a part of my
particular failure here. I think I can safely say that if management
ain't buying it, and if the users are calling the shots, you will only
have a harder time with every attempt.

Whatever you do, don't get involved in that position without having
the compensation and authority clearly defined.

To quote Lynn Bryant: "BUT I'M NOT BITTER!! NOSIREE, I'M NOT BITTER
AT ALL!! NOPE, NO BITTERNESS HERE!!"
*Furman, Paul
Message 3 of 9 (127 Views)

Re:

11-29-2000 11:49 PM in reply to: *Furman, Paul
Hmm, so maybe I'm not too bad off laying low as I am. Sounds like changing
jobs may be my best bet if I need a raise. I'm not much of a salesman
either. Hmm.

Thanks.
*Lila
Message 4 of 9 (127 Views)

Re: CADmanager... NOT

11-30-2000 01:08 AM in reply to: *Furman, Paul
Maybe if you stepped up to the plate to organize the consensus you
mentioned, the users (and maybe even your boss) would see there is a problem
and you could all work together to start solving the problems.

I hope this isn't too basic for you. My husband said guys like to know the
objective before going on the treasure hunt, so the moral of this story
is... get everyone together discussing the problems in front of the boss.
Show the boss you are worth more money by solving the problems (or at least
starting to) then ask for more money.

The following will work out best if the boss is at the meetings hearing the
problems in the office and the solutions that you're going to implement.

Before you organize anything, write a list of things you think are
problematic that need to be solved.

Organize a lunchtime "brown bag" session. The boss can't complain because
it's not on his dime. Users are usually okay with it (as long as it doesn't
happen every day). Bring the list. When you get there share the list and
ask if anyone has anything else to add to the list.

Once you get a list, put them in order of priority. Ask people what they
think is most important. Put it on the top of the list. What's second most
important... etc.

Once you get a list in order, end the meeting (if enough time has passed)
and start working on a solution to the thing on top of the list. On the
sly, ask people how they would solve it. Try to get a good solution to the
problem.

Call another meeting. Ask people if they've thought of any solutions for
the problem. Present your solution to the problem. Ask people how they like
the solution... how to make it equitable for everyone. Once everyone
agrees, then you should have no problem executing the solution.

Do what you can to implement the solution. It will probably be difficult.
Especially if it's layering. Layering is a hard thing to monitor.

Does this sound like Pie in the Sky? Probably. But if you can pull it off,
you should be able to ask for more money... and get it. If you pull it off
and ask for more money and they won't give it to you THEN I would quit and
get another job. Once you have the experience, you can use that as leverage
to get a WAY better paying job.

One thing... you must do this all within a relatively short period of time
for you to be able to ask for more money. I wouldn't go more than 3-6
months. I know that seems like quite a spread of time, but you're list of
problems might be very severe.

Either way you should be able to get more money. CAD Managers are necessary
but very under-appreciated. Good Luck!!!

--

***
remove XYZ when responding directly
***

"Paul Furman" wrote in message
news:3A2610EB.1FA2E1EE@edgehill.net...
> We are a small office & for years I was the only
> person on CAD. There is gradually becoming the
> need for some level of management of the computer
> system but I'm not eager to impose my way as the
> law on folks, especially without monetary
> recognition of the need from above and without
> having any official authority. I understand the
> idea of working with the users to gain consensus
> but the boss isn't a user so that doesn't help my
> position.
>
> We recently got a new manager to schedule projects
> & workhours which is OK with me, I don't want to
> manage people really but the need is becoming
> apparent & I'm the appropriate person to be doing
> the CAD manager type work. We're getting by OK,
> I'm happy to answer questions for everyone but
> there is a lot of fumbling around whereas if we
> got together & had some classes & discussions, it
> might save a good bit of wasted time. If it's not
> my project & they don't ask questions, I keep my
> nose out of it & let them fumble.
>
> Any suggestions how to get a raise & some
> authority over the situation?
>
> For instance, I'm not particularly motivated to go
> out & use my credit card & file it on the expense
> report to purchase small equiptment like software
> utilities, mice, etc. when my opinion isn't taken
> seriously when it comes time to make major
> purchase descisions like a network
> upgrade/consultant or new computers. So far, I'm
> mostly just sitting back & waiting till they
> realize they need help. I fear this won't work.
>
*Lila
Message 5 of 9 (127 Views)

Re:

11-30-2000 01:12 AM in reply to: *Furman, Paul
I just realized the tone of the message might have been a bit harsh. Sorry
about that. I was just in a hurry.

--

***
remove XYZ when responding directly
***
"Lila" wrote in message
news:9A22E2941B1AE108E70C237E24B88876@in.WebX.SaUCah8kaAW...
> Maybe if you stepped up to the plate to organize the consensus you
> mentioned, the users (and maybe even your boss) would see there is a
problem
> and you could all work together to start solving the problems.
>
> I hope this isn't too basic for you. My husband said guys like to know
the
> objective before going on the treasure hunt, so the moral of this story
> is... get everyone together discussing the problems in front of the boss.
> Show the boss you are worth more money by solving the problems (or at
least
> starting to) then ask for more money.
>
> The following will work out best if the boss is at the meetings hearing
the
> problems in the office and the solutions that you're going to implement.
>
> Before you organize anything, write a list of things you think are
> problematic that need to be solved.
>
> Organize a lunchtime "brown bag" session. The boss can't complain because
> it's not on his dime. Users are usually okay with it (as long as it
doesn't
> happen every day). Bring the list. When you get there share the list and
> ask if anyone has anything else to add to the list.
>
> Once you get a list, put them in order of priority. Ask people what they
> think is most important. Put it on the top of the list. What's second
most
> important... etc.
>
> Once you get a list in order, end the meeting (if enough time has passed)
> and start working on a solution to the thing on top of the list. On the
> sly, ask people how they would solve it. Try to get a good solution to
the
> problem.
>
> Call another meeting. Ask people if they've thought of any solutions for
> the problem. Present your solution to the problem. Ask people how they
like
> the solution... how to make it equitable for everyone. Once everyone
> agrees, then you should have no problem executing the solution.
>
> Do what you can to implement the solution. It will probably be difficult.
> Especially if it's layering. Layering is a hard thing to monitor.
>
> Does this sound like Pie in the Sky? Probably. But if you can pull it
off,
> you should be able to ask for more money... and get it. If you pull it
off
> and ask for more money and they won't give it to you THEN I would quit and
> get another job. Once you have the experience, you can use that as
leverage
> to get a WAY better paying job.
>
> One thing... you must do this all within a relatively short period of time
> for you to be able to ask for more money. I wouldn't go more than 3-6
> months. I know that seems like quite a spread of time, but you're list of
> problems might be very severe.
>
> Either way you should be able to get more money. CAD Managers are
necessary
> but very under-appreciated. Good Luck!!!
>
> --
>
> ***
> remove XYZ when responding directly
> ***
>
> "Paul Furman" wrote in message
> news:3A2610EB.1FA2E1EE@edgehill.net...
> > We are a small office & for years I was the only
> > person on CAD. There is gradually becoming the
> > need for some level of management of the computer
> > system but I'm not eager to impose my way as the
> > law on folks, especially without monetary
> > recognition of the need from above and without
> > having any official authority. I understand the
> > idea of working with the users to gain consensus
> > but the boss isn't a user so that doesn't help my
> > position.
> >
> > We recently got a new manager to schedule projects
> > & workhours which is OK with me, I don't want to
> > manage people really but the need is becoming
> > apparent & I'm the appropriate person to be doing
> > the CAD manager type work. We're getting by OK,
> > I'm happy to answer questions for everyone but
> > there is a lot of fumbling around whereas if we
> > got together & had some classes & discussions, it
> > might save a good bit of wasted time. If it's not
> > my project & they don't ask questions, I keep my
> > nose out of it & let them fumble.
> >
> > Any suggestions how to get a raise & some
> > authority over the situation?
> >
> > For instance, I'm not particularly motivated to go
> > out & use my credit card & file it on the expense
> > report to purchase small equiptment like software
> > utilities, mice, etc. when my opinion isn't taken
> > seriously when it comes time to make major
> > purchase descisions like a network
> > upgrade/consultant or new computers. So far, I'm
> > mostly just sitting back & waiting till they
> > realize they need help. I fear this won't work.
> >
>
*Furman, Paul
Message 6 of 9 (127 Views)

Re:

11-30-2000 02:02 AM in reply to: *Furman, Paul
No, not at all harsh, thanks for the thoughts, I like the idea of discussing
with the whole team AND the boss so he can see I know what I'm talking about.

Thanks.
*Seibert, David A.
Message 7 of 9 (127 Views)

Re: CADmanager... NOT

11-30-2000 08:23 AM in reply to: *Furman, Paul
Paul,

> snip <
> So far, I'm
> mostly just sitting back & waiting till they
> realize they need help. I fear this won't work.
> snip <

This won't work ... Ever!

It'll just make them mad and then you'll get nowhere.

Changing jobs won't work unless you go in as CAD Manager and you have the
authority up front. You can't go in, and keep doing what your doing as a
sideline, you'll only end up with more headaches and nothing to show for it.

Get it where your at now, or find someplace where you get it up front, but
don't leave where your at on a promise of someday.

Have fun,

Dave
*Furman, Paul
Message 8 of 9 (127 Views)

Re:

11-30-2000 11:34 AM in reply to: *Furman, Paul
Yes, that would be the other option.

"David A. Seibert" wrote:

> find someplace where you get it up front
*Januszkiewicz, Alex
Message 9 of 9 (127 Views)

Re: CADmanager... NOT

11-30-2000 03:27 PM in reply to: *Furman, Paul
If you are qualified to manage CADD system, small or large, "sitting back
and waiting" will not get you anywhere. Keep taking initiative, that's part
of management. If your effort produces results and your company doesn't
recognize it, drop them.
Leave your resume with few agents, tell them that you are looking for the
position of CADD Manager. Then do your work as usual and wait for phone
calls.
Most of the good positions I landed in past 19 years were through technical
agencies (including four years luxurious contract for Hibernia GBS behemoth
(link from http://www.intelcad.com/pages/intel-rc/): setup, programming and
management of AutoCAD concrete detailing system of over 100 stations... and
working 8 weeks in Paris, all expenses paid). My experience (and my agent
selling it) got me in, out of more than 1000 candidates.
It's in agent's best interest to sell good specialists for high price and
keep them happy, so that they will use them again, when the time comes to
change the job. Even though I'm happy with my current long term contract, I
receive call from my agent every 6 months, just checking, if I'm ready for a
change.

Your next week assignment : make up perfect resume stressing your CADD
management and programming skills then fax it around, make some calls. And
let us know when you succeed :smileywink:

--
Alex Januszkiewicz
IntelCAD Systems / DWG Data Recovery Services
http://www.intelcad.com
* BLITZ! - Standalone Tools For Processing DWG/DXF *
* DWF => DWG converter*
--

Paul Furman wrote in message
news:3A2610EB.1FA2E1EE@edgehill.net...
> We are a small office & for years I was the only
> person on CAD. There is gradually becoming the
> need for some level of management of the computer
> system but I'm not eager to impose my way as the
> law on folks, especially without monetary
> recognition of the need from above and without
> having any official authority. I understand the
> idea of working with the users to gain consensus
> but the boss isn't a user so that doesn't help my
> position.
>
> We recently got a new manager to schedule projects
> & workhours which is OK with me, I don't want to
> manage people really but the need is becoming
> apparent & I'm the appropriate person to be doing
> the CAD manager type work. We're getting by OK,
> I'm happy to answer questions for everyone but
> there is a lot of fumbling around whereas if we
> got together & had some classes & discussions, it
> might save a good bit of wasted time. If it's not
> my project & they don't ask questions, I keep my
> nose out of it & let them fumble.
>
> Any suggestions how to get a raise & some
> authority over the situation?
>
> For instance, I'm not particularly motivated to go
> out & use my credit card & file it on the expense
> report to purchase small equiptment like software
> utilities, mice, etc. when my opinion isn't taken
> seriously when it comes time to make major
> purchase descisions like a network
> upgrade/consultant or new computers. So far, I'm
> mostly just sitting back & waiting till they
> realize they need help. I fear this won't work.
>

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