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Distinguished Contributor
auto99
Posts: 425
Registered: ‎03-24-2004
Message 1 of 11 (3,057 Views)
Accepted Solution

Full path, relative path, no path

3057 Views, 10 Replies
12-05-2007 09:40 AM
Can somebody explain the differences between these xref paths?
Also pls cite some examples when or how to use each of them.
I am particularly curios on No Path and Relative Path. Thanks.
*A+P
Message 2 of 11 (3,057 Views)

Re: Full path, relative path, no path

12-05-2007 09:53 AM in reply to: auto99
I would never use no path because that means when you attach an xref,
there's nothing that would tell AutoCAD where the xref drawing is actually
located.
So AutoCAD by default will look in the current drawing's folder and then the
support search paths.
This is dangerous because the end user really loses control of where exactly
to locate the reference drawing.

There may be times that it's necessary to use relative path. No drive
letters are included in this method. But the folder structure cannot
change. Reference drawings are located based on the location relative to
the current drawing location. So if you ever have to reference the drawing
from outside of the folder structure, the references will not be found.

Absolute path was how AutoCAD originally introduced the use of references.
The entire path including the drive letter is included when you reference in
a drawing. As long as you're in the same network structure, AutoCAD will be
able to find the referenced drawing file. But once you put the set of
drawings in a different drive letter, AutoCAD will fail to find the
referenced drawings.

Paul

wrote in message news:5793327@discussion.autodesk.com...
Can somebody explain the differences between these xref paths?
Also pls cite some examples when or how to use each of them.
I am particularly curios on No Path and Relative Path. Thanks.
*Joel
Message 3 of 11 (3,057 Views)

Re: Full path, relative path, no path

12-05-2007 10:13 AM in reply to: auto99
I use "No Path" only if the xref actually is in the same directory as the
parent drawing. Usually only for smaller projects where I don't need all
kinds of sub-directories.

Although, as A+P noted, it can get dangerous.

A lot of people in my office name the base floor plan of a project something
like "x-base.dwg". But they'll name it that for every project. I tend to
add project specific information (such as a part of the project number that
is always different and is never duplicated) to the file name, for example,
"1234-x-base.dwg". That way it's never confused with another project just
by looking at the file name.
Distinguished Contributor
auto99
Posts: 425
Registered: ‎03-24-2004
Message 4 of 11 (3,057 Views)

Re: Full path, relative path, no path

12-05-2007 10:39 AM in reply to: auto99
Thanks for all the reply.

One reason I am interested in learning more about how xrefs function is I often work at home. Everytime I bring back work to the office from home, all the xrefs need to be re-path back to our E drive. It is very annoying. I still do not know how to properly deal with this problem.
Distinguished Contributor
auto99
Posts: 425
Registered: ‎03-24-2004
Message 5 of 11 (3,057 Views)

Re: Full path, relative path, no path

12-05-2007 10:39 AM in reply to: auto99
Thanks for all the reply.

One reason I am interested in learning more about how xrefs function is I often work at home. Everytime I bring back work to the office from home, all the xrefs need to be re-path back to our E drive. It is very annoying. I still do not know how to properly deal with this problem.
Distinguished Contributor
auto99
Posts: 425
Registered: ‎03-24-2004
Message 6 of 11 (3,057 Views)

Re: Full path, relative path, no path

12-05-2007 10:44 AM in reply to: auto99
Everytime I post it appears twice. -$&*#@

Message was edited by: auto99 Message was edited by: auto99
*A+P
Message 7 of 11 (3,057 Views)

Re: Full path, relative path, no path

12-05-2007 10:59 AM in reply to: auto99
If you only have a C: drive at home and don't have an E: drive, then you can
use the following to trick your computer in thinking that your C: drive is
your E: drive as well.

1.. Click on Start|Run
2.. Use the SUBST command to replicate the C: drive to match with E: drive
i.e SUBST E: C:\
Now, your drive listing should show the C: drive contents also as the E:
drive contents.



To remove the E: drive assignment, do the following:



1.. Click on Start|Run
2.. Use the SUBST command again and enter the following: SUBST E: /d
But just remember to XREF things always from the E: drive at home and not
from the C: drive and use the exact same folder structure.

Paul

wrote in message news:5793404@discussion.autodesk.com...
Thanks for all the reply.

One reason I am interested in learning more about how xrefs function is I
often work at home. Everytime I bring back work to the office from home,
all the xrefs need to be re-path back to our E drive. It is very annoying.
I still do not know how to properly deal with this problem.
*Gordon Stephens
Message 8 of 11 (3,057 Views)

Re: Full path, relative path, no path

12-05-2007 05:52 PM in reply to: auto99
I have always used Full path and repath as necessary when drawings move - same for images. It seems that relative paths
offer more complications.

One of the annoyances is when I carry drawings with xrefs and images from my office to another office on a CD. When
loaded on another PC for review and editing, I usually need to repath. I must admit I've never used etransmit or
anything similar so don't know if this would solve the problem.
--
Gordon


wrote in message news:5793409@discussion.autodesk.com...
Everytime I post it appears twice. -$&*#@

Message was edited by: auto99

Message was edited by: auto99
Distinguished Contributor
Rudedog
Posts: 1,222
Registered: ‎10-14-2004
Message 9 of 11 (3,057 Views)

Re: Full path, relative path, no path

12-06-2007 05:21 AM in reply to: auto99
Use Relative paths if your wish to make your files more portable. There is no drive letter associated with them.
Distinguished Contributor
anim8er
Posts: 175
Registered: ‎07-22-2005
Message 10 of 11 (3,057 Views)

Re: Full path, relative path, no path

12-10-2007 01:39 PM in reply to: auto99
Contrary to what others say, I use "No Path" almost exclusively. My projects are Pipeline Mapping. The project exists in one folder containing a single model or a couple of model files. Then as many as 100 or more individual drawing files exist to reference the common models. There is no reference to other disciplines or departments. I don't understand why this would be "dangerous". I maintain all files with unique names. What is dangerous, is having multiple files with the same name, placed in different folders. I always maintain files with unique names, so that different versions don't get overwritten accidentally. Absolute and relative paths would be problematic when delivered to a client. Our company has a standardized folder directory structure, but every client is operating with their own system. I deliver one folder with all appropriate files in that folder. Without a path, it doesn't matter where that folder resides for either me or the client, and there is no confusion as to what files are necessary for the project, just everything in the folder.

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