AutoCAD 2000/2000i/2002 Archive

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Contributor
RMoore
Posts: 23
Registered: ‎10-19-2001
Message 1 of 10 (50 Views)

JPEG

50 Views, 9 Replies
08-28-2000 11:29 AM
Is there anyway possible to save (or export) an AutoCAD 2000 dwg. as a JPEG? Thanks!! - Rebecca
*Dotson, Terry W.
Message 2 of 10 (50 Views)

Re: JPEG

08-28-2000 11:40 AM in reply to: RMoore
RMoore wrote:

> Is there anyway possible to save (or export) an AutoCAD 2000 dwg. as a
> JPEG?

Start > Settings > Control Panel > Autodesk Plotter Manager > Add A
Plotter Wizard
Choose Next > My Computer > Raster File Formats > Choose Output Format
(JPEG?)
Next ... Until Finish.

In AutoCAD's Plot dialog, choose it like a plotter and plot to it.

Important note. The JPEG format is a *LOSSY* compression format and IS
NOT A SUITABLE format for raster representations of vector files such as
drawings. I *STRONGLY* recommend you choose PNG, or at least GIF. Take
a look at this comparison graphic
[http://24.216.164.75/temp/compare.gif]. Look at the 'fuzz' on the
diagonal magenta vectors on the JPEG side (left). Then look at the
crisp output of the PNG on the right.

Again, JPEG is not a suitable format.

Good Luck, Terry

o---------------------------------------------------o
| Have you visited http://www.dotsoft.com lately? |
o---------------------------------------------------o
New Member
rroddy
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎08-28-2000
Message 3 of 10 (50 Views)

Re: JPEG

08-28-2000 11:43 AM in reply to: RMoore
Usually, photo paint program have a screen capture that you can use.
Contributor
tmatheson
Posts: 12
Registered: ‎08-08-2003
Message 4 of 10 (50 Views)

Re:

08-31-2000 12:01 PM in reply to: RMoore
Terry was talking about png and gif formats being superior to jpg. What are your thoughts eps and tif file formats.
*Dotson, Terry W.
Message 5 of 10 (50 Views)

Re:

09-01-2000 05:58 AM in reply to: RMoore
tmatheson wrote:

> Terry was talking about png and gif formats being superior to jpg.
> What are your thoughts eps and tif file formats.

EPS (Encapulated Postscript) can be vector based, differs from the rest
of the formats. It can produce excellent output to Postscript printers
but is difficult to represent on the screen.

TIF is okay, but it's like the Baskin Robbins of rasters. It can come
in so many flavors you never *really know* if your software is going to
read it. Large greyscale aerial photos justify thier existance as
TIF's.

Terry
*Saadallah, Dean
Message 6 of 10 (50 Views)

Re:

09-01-2000 11:12 AM in reply to: RMoore
I get better quality PNG files than JPG files, and GIF files
are limited in color depth although you can mask the backgrounds in them. Of
course, JPG and GIF files are the standard INTERNET formats.

 

EPS and TIFF come in so many versions, and most programs only
read one or two at best.

 



style="PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">
Terry
was talking about png and gif formats being superior to jpg. What are your
thoughts eps and tif file formats.
*Nehls, Kevin
Message 7 of 10 (50 Views)

Re:

09-01-2000 11:18 AM in reply to: RMoore
PNG is also a standard internet raster format, nor does it have the limited
color bit depth of GIF. It is a kind of combination of the two formats.
Really, the only thing that it can't do is animations, like the GIF 89a
format can. The PNG format was/is design to eventually replace the GIF
format since the GIF format is owned by a company (I don't remember who),
where PNG and JPEG are not, they are true internet standard graphics. GIF
is a format that existed before and was adopted by the internet.

--
Kevin Nehls
remove -ns- for direct reply
On the other hand, you have fingers.

"Dean Saadallah" wrote in message
news:A0136B786EC1AF1C20253A5DC12563A2@in.WebX.SaUCah8kaAW...
> I get better quality PNG files than JPG files, and GIF files are limited
in color depth although you can mask the backgrounds in them. Of course, JPG
and GIF files are the standard INTERNET formats.
>
> EPS and TIFF come in so many versions, and most programs only read one or
two at best.
>
>
> --
> Dean Saadallah
> www.pendean.com
*Dotson, Terry W.
Message 8 of 10 (50 Views)

Re:

09-01-2000 11:43 AM in reply to: RMoore
Kevin Nehls wrote:

> ... the GIF format since the GIF format is owned by
> a company (I don't remember who)

That would be Unisys, who collects royalties from any application that
creates a GIF.

Terry
*Nehls, Kevin
Message 9 of 10 (50 Views)

Re:

09-01-2000 01:10 PM in reply to: RMoore
Thank you. I knew it was something like that but I couldn't get the name
UniGraphics out of my head and knew that was wrong.

--
Kevin Nehls
remove -ns- for direct reply
On the other hand, you have fingers.

"Terry W. Dotson" wrote in message
news:39AFF8C2.BECD0BD0@dotsoft.com...
> Kevin Nehls wrote:
>
> > ... the GIF format since the GIF format is owned by
> > a company (I don't remember who)
>
> That would be Unisys, who collects royalties from any application that
> creates a GIF.
>
> Terry
*Fleming, Jon
Message 10 of 10 (50 Views)

Re:

09-02-2000 05:57 AM in reply to: RMoore
There seem to be some misconceptions about EPS ...

There are two versions of EPS, "Red Book" EPS (a subset of PostScript)
and "Adobe Illustrator" EPS (the native file format of some versions of
Adobe Illustrator, read by many illustrator-type programs, similar to
but different from PostScript). There used to be problems with getting
"AI EPS" programs to read "Red Book EPS", but those problems have
essentially disappeared in the past few years. AutoCAD PSOUT and
PostScript plotter drivers produce Red Book EPS.

EPS is primarily a vector format. It can contain raster data, but
essentially never does unless the source contains raster data. Any EPS
file you produce from AtuoCAD will be vector format except for any
IMAGE entities.

jrf
Member of the Autodesk Discussion Forum Moderator Program

In article , Dean
Saadallah wrote:
> EPS and TIFF come in so many versions, and most programs only read
> one or two at best.

In article <39AFA7F2.4768564@dotsoft.com>, Terry W. Dotson wrote:
> EPS (Encapulated Postscript) can be vector based,
>

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